Side-by-side comparison of a traditional keyword search (stemmed/unstemmed/phrase) with a blended keyword and k-NN search over Canberra Times news articles from 1994 using CLIP with the ViT-L-14::openai model(vector length 768) or openai ada-002 (vector length 1536), SOLR 9.1/Lucene 9.3 (vector length patch) with HNSW vector searching and Stanford NLP for entity extraction

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Traditional 'Keyword only' phrase/stemmed/unstemmed search found 307 articles

People
PAUL KEATING 34
JOHN MAJOR 25
JOHN HEWSON 23
ALEXANDER DOWNER 13
BILL CLINTON 10
JOHN DAWKINS 10
JOHN FAULKNER 10
JOHN HOWARD 10
PAUL CHAMBERLIN 9
ROS KELLY 9
Organisations
PARLIAMENT 31
CANBERRA TIMES 28
LABOR 27
CABINET 23
SENATE 22
LIBERAL PARTY 18
LABOR PARTY 17
BHP 14
COMMONWEALTH 14
BUDGET 13
Locations
AUSTRALIA 152
UNITED STATES 94
CANBERRA 93
SYDNEY 91
MELBOURNE 68
BRITAIN 51
LONDON 51
AUSTRA 34
QUEENSLAND 33
EUROPE 32
Misc
AUSTRALIAN 130
AMERICAN 55
AUSTRALIANS 47
BRITISH 44
ENGLISH 28
FRENCH 22
EUROPEAN 19
AMERICANS 18
LIBERALS 17
VICTORIAN 17

[Compare Trove search for the fall of John Major]

  1. 1994-12-03 Article 127258172, score 14.262051 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People KURT SCHORK,   GOJKO SUSAK,   MICHAEL ROSE,   ROBERT DOLE,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations UN PROTECTION FORCE,   UNITED NATIONS,   NATO,   UNPROFOR
    Locations FRANCE,   LONDON,   BRITAIN,   BRUSSELS,   CROATIA,   KRAJINA,   BIHAC,   ZAGREB,   BOSNIA,   SARAJEVO,   UNITED STATES,   VELIKA KLADUSA
    Misc SERBS,   BOSNIAN,   CRO ATIAN,   BOSNIAN MUSLIMS,   CROATIAN,   BOSNIANS,   BRITISH,   BOSNIAN SERBS
    INTERNATIONAL Bihac still under siege By KURT SCHORK SARAJEVO, Friday: Bosnian Serbs steadily whittled away at the defences of the embattled Bosnian town of Bihac as ministerial meetings were scheduled in Brussels today to amend a peace plan to end the 32-month war. After several peace deals, the latest of which the Serbs rejected, they appeared to be unstoppable on the battleground and the major powers prepared to offer them fresh concessions in peace talks. Mean while, the United Nations has said the Serbs have gained more ground in the suburbs of the town of Bihac, a UN-desig nated safe area. The fall of the enclave would give the Serbs more leverage in negotiating with Croatia since a railroad vital for the Cro atian city of Zagreb runs through the area. The Croatian Defence Minister, Gojko Susak, threatened to interfere in the Bihac fighting, saying: If Croatia should estimate that Bihac will fall, Cro atia will intervene before that happens. But the UN reported its first bright news in months, saying rebel Krajina Serbs and Croatia would sign a landmark agreement on economic cooperation. The agreement is seen as a step towards a pos Killing fields LONDON, Friday: British Prime Min ister John Major said today the with drawal of United Nations peacekeeping forces from Bosnia would turn the country into a killing field . Mr Major said the situation in Bosnia was extremely serious. But the posi tion if the embargo was lifted and [the UN Protection Force] UNPROFOR was forced to withdraw would be even worse and particularly it would be even worse for the Bosnians, he said. The belief that that would produce a level playing field is not in my judgment right, it would produce a level killing field. Britain and its NATO ally France have been angered by accusations by US Senator Robert Dole that they had ve toed US calls for NATO air strikes. . Reuler sible reconciliation between the two sides. The Bosnian Serbs have also detained more UN soldiers. But UN officials said last night they believed the commander of , UN forces in Bosnia, General Sir Michael Rose, had won pledges for the release of the peacekeepers. Router Bosnian Muslims were rounded up following recent fighting in the town of Velika Kladusa, some 40km north of Bihac.
  2. 1994-08-23 Article 118264432, score 14.222931 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People CHRIS STEWART,   JIM SWEENEY,   MICHAEL YIANNAKIS SYDNEY,   JOHN THAME
    Organisations BANK,   BANK MELBOURNE,   TREVOR STEEL,   METWAY BANK,   WESTPAC BANKING CORP,   BANK OF MEL,   RESERVE BANK,   COMMONWEALTH BANK OF AUSTRALIA LTD,   ST GEORGE BANK LTD.,   ST GEORGE,   ADVANCE BANK AUSTRALIA,   NATIONAL AUSTRALIA BANK LTD,   ANZ BANKING GROUP LTD
    Locations METWAY
    Misc AUSTRALIAN
    BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Regional banks shed value after rates increase By MICHAEL YIANNAKIS SYDNEY: Shares in Aus tralia's major regional banks continued to fall sharply yesterday after last week's changes to the risk weight ing of housing loans and the rise in official interest rates. Shares in some regional banks fell 2 per cent, taking losses since last Wednesday's rise in official cash rates to as much as 5 per cent. ( Analysts, said the regionals would suffer most from the Re serve Bank's decision to lift of ficial rates to 5.5 per cent from 4.75 per cent, bccausc the big ger and more diversified banks would be more able to absorb some of the cost. The rcgionals liaVe the bulk of their loan exposure to home lending, St George Bank Ltd. for instance, having around 75 per cent of its loan book in re sidential lending. One analyst said yesterday that the regionals had relied heavily on home loans, and any change to that would erode their profits. Home lending has been a major source of growth for some of the regionals, he said. This fall is mostly linked to changes in the risk weighting. But I'd be surprised to see Clockwise from top Australian bank chief executives: Jim Sweeney, St George; John Thame, Advance; Chris Stewart, Bank Melbourne; Trevor Steel, Metway. them fall much further. Under the changes, the Reserve Bank will restrict the 50 per cent risk weight for housing loans to those with a loan to valuation ratio of 80 per cent or less. A 100 per cent risk weight will apply to those loans having an' loan to valuation above 80 per cent. Another analyst said the re gionals would feel the pinch when the Reserve Bank's new regulations were enforced from September 5. St George shares fell 12c, or 2.1 per cent, to S5.33 yesterday; Advance Bank Australia lost 16c to S8.80; Bank of Mel bourne fell 5c to S4.55; and Metway Bank lost 3c to S3.65. Shares in the big four banks were steadier. Among the majors, Westpac Banking Corp fell 2c S4.36, NAB ended at 10.80, Commonwealth Bank of Australia Ltd rose 4c to S7.67, and ANZ Banking Group Ltd fell lc to 4.04. Meanwhile, banks Continued to play a cat and mouse game, with none willing to be the first to announce an inevitable rise in variable mortgage ratesi Analysts said they expected most banks td wait until the National Australia Bank Ltd announced its move, most like ly after its next meeting on the issue on Friday. The monthly repayment on a SI00,000 mortgage over 25 years would rise to S857 from S823 if the banks decided on a 0.5 percentage point increase in variable rates.
  3. 1994-11-26 Article 130540186, score 13.866995 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   WILLIAM CASH,   MARGARET THATCHER,   JOHN MAJOR,   MARCUS FOX,   RICHARD MEARES
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION,   EU,   CABINET,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOUR PARTY
    Locations LONDON,   EU,   BRITAIN,   EUROPE
    Misc MAASTRICHT,   EUROSCEPTIC,   EURO-REBELS,   GUARDIAN,   BRITISH
    INTERNATIONAL Major warns Tories: EU yes or a poll - By RICHARD MEARES LONDON, Friday: The British Prime Minister, John Major, has turned the thumbscrews on Euro-rebels in his ruling Conservative Party, saying that if they de fy him over a European Union budget vote next week he will call elections. Political commentators said his threat was likely to ensure any revolt fails but they were carefully counting heads. Uncer tainty lingered as some rebels vowed to fight on despite the danger to a government only two years into a five-year term. Mr Major said he and his Cabinet colleagues had agreed to stand or fall together over the vote on Monday to authorise a hefty rise in Britain's contribu tion to next year's EU budget. If the Government were de feated, the Government would resign and the Prime Minister would ask the Queen to dissolve Parliament, he said in a state ment. Cabinet members publicly de clared their support to quell re ports that their ranks contained Eurosceptic rebels politic ians ready to challenge Mr Ma jor for the leadership. Party leaders said rebels were wrong to think they could crack a unit ed front to avoid elections, and John Major insisted no-one would bid for Mr Major's job if the budget Bill sank. In a key victory for Mr Major, rebels failed to oust his choice, Marcus Fox, from the leadership of a key panel of Conservative backbench MPs. The closed-door vote was widely seen as a chal lenge by proxy to Mr Major's authority, but the real test will come on Monday. The public row is highly dam aging to a party and Govern ment already blackened by splits and scandals involving Members' shady private morals and financial ethics. Just one thing after another, said the ed itorial in today's Guardian newspaper. Many hard-core anti-EU poli ticians are also critical of Mr Major's handling of the Govern ment since he took over from Margaret Thatcher in 1990 in a party coup. Mr Major, 31 percentage points behind the Labour Party in the latest opinion poll, has long been hounded by unrest over Europe, his party's most di visive issue. After victory in the last general election in 1992, he narrowly survived a similar cri sis over a vote to ratify the Maastricht treaty on political ties in the EU. Before Mr Major's interven tion yesterday, rebel William Cash said some 15 Conservatives would vote for an amendment to the bill withholding extra cash until the EU had cracked down on fraud. Mr Gash said he doubted the Prime Minister would really call an election if he lost. But most observers said they believed the solidity of Cabinet support for Mr Major had convinced the rebels the Prime Minister really meant.what he said. Ftoutftr
  4. 1994-05-15 Article 118211725, score 13.662313 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   KENNETH CLARKE,   MICHAEL PORTILLO,   MICHAEL HESELTINE,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN SMITH
    Organisations PARLIAMENT,   TORIES,   LABOUR
    Locations WALES,   LONDON,   SCOTLAND,   ENGLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   EUROPE,   WATERLOO,   UNITED STATES,   GERMANY,   WELLINGTON,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc AMERICANS,   BRITONS,   AUSTRALIANS,   EUROPEAN,   CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH
    Jig is up for UK Conservatives BILL MANDLE THE BRITISH local-govern ment election results have been devastating for the Conservatives. Whether such elections ought to be taken as a national barome ter is nowadays a lost argument. The Conservatives themselves, ,and John Major in particular, de cided ,to fight a national cam paign in the hope the national . opipi.on polls might be proved wrong.-They weren't. Their repu tation, badly soiled by the last generalrelection result, has been restored? The '27 per cent level at which they estimated Conservative support was the one reached by Conservative council'candidates. In London, all seats were at stake; so too in Scotland. In the rest of England and Wales only a third of the seats were up for de cision, but the result must be tak n as nationally indicative, partic ularly as it is so close to the MORI poll findings of late April. Why the Conservatives chose to make the local-government elec tions a national referendum may seem a, mystery. To be sure, local government has been rendered so weak, in all that matters, by both liabour and Conservative govern tments in the '70s '80s and '90s that what they can do is deter mined by national government .policy, and voters realise that. .Even so, it would have seemed to lie in the Tories' best interest to Revolve its campaigning to such ;parish-pump issues as remain and keep Westminster out of it. That they did not do so is at tributable to Mr Major himself, much as he may now, in light of e result, attempt to disclaim it. 'It was his last, desperate throw to -retain 'his prime-ministership. On June 9 the elections for the Euro pean Parliament take place. But Air .Major, given the evident and continuing division in his party over the nature and extent of Britain's participation in Europe, could hardly use those elections as a Waterloo in which he was Wellington. Those who voted would be acting from a variety of motives/ Not all who voted Con servative could be claimed for Mr Major. He knows that the world knows that. The local government elections it had to be. Mr Major is a fighter. He will not go gladly into that good night of political oblivion. He has doggedness, vanity, and, as his re markable rise shows, no mean po litical skills. He was able, once, to be all things to all men, and to one woman. He proved capable of gaining her support and that of a great number of those who overthrew her. It has been his misfortune since to lose the sup port of both. HE IS now in a precarious position. But so he was late in the 1992 general election. Then acting uncannily, like Paul Keating, he decided to go it alone and fight the campaign off his own soapbox. So doing, he won. Again, as with Keating, he was helped by the fact that the elec torate trusted neither his oppo nents nor their leader. Neverthe less, the victory was quite rightly hailed as a personal triumph. Now Mr Major is again belea guered. Whether he, or indeed his party, should be, is another mat ter. The Conservative Govern ment has, on most of the indicat ors, done well. Industrial production is rising faster than Australia's;- Unemployment is now under 10 per cent, and fall ing. Inflation is low, at close to Australia's much vaunted rate in this, last quarter. Prime interest rates are much lower than Aus tralia's and Germany's; somewhat lower than the United States's. The stock market is up on the year. Only the current-account deficit is a worry. The Conserva tive front bench, Mr Major in cluded, is far abler and more pre sentable than Labour's, the more so now with the death of Labour leader John Smith. Whey then the deep unpopular ity of Mr Major and his Govern ment? Perception politics. The continuing sex scandals may not in any way have affected the economy; but Britons are not as tolerant as the Americans, or the Australians, come to that. They are more prurient, more envious, more insecure. That Britain's exit from the European exchange rate mechanism was a total reversal of declared policy is no cause for wonder these days. But it has been made one. Mr Major has been ruthlessly caricatured. An air of rickety shiftlessness prevails. The odour of decay blends with the scent of blood, and the aroma of rank, ensemen'd sheets. Mr Major was forced to make a stand. The party had to go along with him because it knows that its current desperate situation is not entirely due to Mr Major. Neither Kenneth Clarke, Michael Heseltine, nor Michael Portillo would stand a chance of winning a general election now. The fu ture, starting now, might have been different. The fall in elector al support has been so dramatic and so undeserved that there was hope that there could be an equally dramatic resurgence. Mr Major and his party were im pelled by similar desperation. In 1992 Mr Major himself and a scare campaign about Labour were sufficient to turn the tide. This time the personal appear ances and the bogey of loony-left Labour councils have not worked. Lightning has not struck twice. The killing blow has fallen else where; self-inflicted. '
  5. 1994-06-22 Article 118173252, score 13.380088 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NORMAN FOWLER,   PAUL JUDGE,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations TORY,   TORIES
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN
    Misc INDEPENDENT,   CONSERVATIVES
    Major problems for unpopular PM 'There is not much point in spending money on a product that is unsaleable' LONDON: Big business and other financial supporters arc deserting Britain's ruling Con servative Party because of the unpopularity of the Prime Min ister, John Major, raising doubts about the leadership's confident claims that the party's financial crisis has been resolved. Former senior Conservative officials believe there could be a black hole of millions of pounds in the accounts which the party has to fill before it has to raise even more money to fight the next general election. The party is suffering from a crisis of financial uncertainty with traditional sources of fi nance ebbing away. Latest com pany accounts show that pay ments from 11 of the largest corporate donors have fallen from more than 500,000 (SA1.2 million) to about 100,000 (SA220,000) in the past year. Even allowing for an inevita ble drop after the 1992 election and the effect of the recession, it raises serious questions about the recent claims by the party's retiring chairman, Sir Norman Fowler, that the Tories' financial fortunes have improved. Sir Norman, announcing last week his plans to retire, said: In the last two years we have had a major reform of the party organisation and the party fi nances have been turned around. The fall in donations puts into sharp relief that claim and the confident assertion made to The Independent by Paul Judge, the Conservatives' director-general, who has responsibility for the party's finances, that he aims to eliminate the Tories' current 16.5 million overdraft by 1996. The party would probably need to raise at least the same amount again to fight the gener al election. For that to happen, large companies should be giving gen erously not scaling back their support. There are some who blame the parlous state of the finances for undermining electoral per formance. There are fears that the Tories will not have enough to pay for the next election. Three former senior party workers accused Sir Norman of giving the impression that the party's financial problems were over, when in truth, his succes sor has a mountain to climb. They argued that management reforms carried out by Sir Nor man at Tory central office will prove ineffective. The deficit is Sir Norman's fault, one said, accusing him of taking no action to stem it dur ing his first year when it grew by 6 million. The former financial managers said the financial troubles stemmed mainly from the con tinuing unpopularity of John Major and his Government. There's not much point in spending money on a product that is unsaleable. If there is a washing powder that nobody wants, there is no point in spending money on it, a former party treasurer said. The Independent
  6. 1994-02-22 Article 134303891, score 12.922728 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN FLETCHER
    Organisations ENSCO,   BRAMBLES INDUSTRIES LTD,   BRAMBLES
    Locations STATES,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   EUROPE,   UNITED STATES,   ARKANSAS
    Misc EU
    Brambles 313m loss due to big abnormal SYDNEY: A huge abnormal loss and poor performances in the Unit ed, States and Europe pushed trans port and equipment services group Brambles Industries Ltd deeply in to the red in the December half. The company announced yester day an interim net loss of 313.95 million, which included an abnor mal loss of 377.03 million, mostly a write-off in goodwill from its US waste management operation, En vironmental Systems Co (ENSCO). The result compares with last year's 88.08 million net profit. However, the company said it would maintain its 30c fully frank ed dividend although its net profit John Fletcher: still confident before abnormals fell 17 per cent to 73 million. The earnings result was struck on a 2.5 per cent fall in sales to 1.28 billion. Chief executive John Fletcher said the economic downturn in Eu rope and structural changes in the US hazardous waste market ac counted for most of the earnings decline. However, Mr Fletcher said he was confident the unit would return to profits and said Brambles was looking at increasing the number of waste transfer operations run by ENSCO from four to five to help with the transfer of waste to the major facility in Arkansas. We arc not looking at cutting down any more ENSCO opera tions, he said. Mr Fletcher said the full year op erating profit would be in line with previous expectations of around 150 million because of the strong performance in Australia and the expected improvements in Europe and the US . The group's overall perform ance is underpinned by profitable industrial services businesses ... The changes we are making, includ ing the write ' downs ... will strengthen our ability to achieve our longer-term objectives by the end of the decade. Brambles shares ended 26c lower yesterday at 14.30.
  7. 1994-02-10 Article 134300840, score 12.772865 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALEX TROTMAN,   JOHN OG DEN
    Organisations FORD MOTOR COM,   GEN ERAL MOTORS-HOLDEN,   US FORD AUSTRALIA,   OPEL,   FORD,   MERCEDES-BENZ,   FORD MOTOR COMPANY OF AUSTRALIA,   FORD AUSTRALIA,   FALCON
    Locations AMERICA,   BROADMEA,   AUSTRALIA,   HOMEBUSH,   DETROIT,   UNITED STATES
    Misc C-CLASS,   GERMAN,   CAPRI,   MERCEDES
    Hopes now ride on future of Falcon COMMENT By PETER BREWER By axing the Capri convertible and closing, its Homebush assembly plant, the Ford Motor Company of Australia is effectively lopping off its dying branches to keep its trunk healthy. But in this decisive but necessary action, the company has put all its focus on one car the Falcon yet given no firm indication whether that car will still be made in Australia by the year 2000. Under the prolonged lead times required to design and engineer the platform and myriad of components in any new car, a manufacturer requires time and resources. By ending Capri production at Broadmea dows, Ford gives itself more of the latter, but is running out of the former. To provide a contemporary comparison, Mercedes-Benz designed, engineered, and then signed off' for production its new C-class small car, due for public release in Australia this month, in just 31 months a feat which the German manufacturer declared as unprecedented in its 100-year history. Even by borrowing an established design from its United States parent company, re-engineering it for right-hand drive and then tooling up the new Falcon for produc tion, Ford has little hope of matching the Mercedes feat. And the longer Ford delays making a deci sion, the more it falls behind the timetable established by its major competitor, Gen eral Motors-Holden's Automotive, which is on target to launch its all-new Opel designed Commodore in late 1996. The chairman of the Ford Motor Com pany in the US, Alex Trotman, said in Detroit last month that all Ford's subsid iary companies would be required to fund their own future model programs. On this basis, the likelihood of an all-new Falcon in 1997 seems even more remote. Ford Australia lost 186 million in 1991, 57.8 million in 1992 and yesterday an nounced an after-tax loss of 45 million for 1993, including the write-offs from the closure of Homebush and winding up the Capri. The president of Ford Australia, John Og den, said developing an all-new Falcon, even using the existing engine, transmis sion, brakes and major components, would cost about 500 million. Amortising an investment of that size from a car which is produced, by world terms, in very low volume about 80,000 cars a year would be a challenging exer cise. More likely is that Ford will hedge its bets with the new Falcon. Some clever engineering and re-design could extend the life of the current Fal con until the late 1990s at a small propor tion of the cost of building an all-new model. At the same time and already confirmed by senior Ford executives in the US Ford Australia will import a right-hand drive version of America's top selling car, the front-wheel drive Ford Tau rus. The company could sell the two large cars one an ageing rear-wheel drive model and the other a far more modern front drive vehicle alongside each other in the market and let the public make its choice. If Falcon sales fall away to an uneconomic al level, just as the company experienced with the Capri, only then would Ford let the axe fall. The blame could then only be propor tioned at the changing whims of the mar ket, not at Ford's failure to re-invest in local manufacturing and by then it would all be too late to build a new Falcon anyway.
  8. 1994-06-14 Article 118171296, score 12.77231 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN QUIGGIN
    Organisations JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY,   ECONOMIC POLICY RESEARCH,   DEPARTMENT OL ECONOMICS,   AUSTRALIAN BUREAU,   QANTAS,   JOHN QUIGGIN,   NISSAN,   COMMONWEALTH BANK,   ANZ
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   AUSTRALIAN
    Community services the key to more jobs JOHN QUIGGIN says only a major policy reversal will ensure solid, long-term employment growth. WITH the unemployment rate falling below 10 per cent, and the White Paper in place, it appears that the Govern ment believes that no further re sponse to unemployment is warrant ed. - Many in the Government assume they can safely disregard unemploy ment, at least until the next recession. ' For those who like to regard them selves as hard-headed realists it has become an axiom that unemployment only matters when it is rising. The idea is that Australians are qnly concerned about unemployment when they fear the loss of their own jobs, and that this fear will disappear once unemployment starts falling. , This cynical calculation is political ly unsound, as well as morally unjus tifiable. In recession and in recovery, there are many fewer secure jobs in the Australian economy than there were in the past. ' Headlines such as More jobs will go at Qantas, says chief', Nissan to Vote on redundancy , ANZ to shed 2500 staff in cost-cutting drive , An other 6000 rail jobs will go and Commonwealth Bank to cut 7500 workers are a feature of this era. As the violent reaction to unfair dismissal legislation has shown, more and more employers now regard re trenchments as an, essential tool fbr responding to fluctuations in demand or changing the direction of their en terprise. Voters (and politicians) who con tinue to regard unemployment as somebody else's problem may find 'that it is in fact their own. The decline in unemployment has ,been very weak. At the same stage in jhe recovery from the 1981-83 reces sion, unemployment was already be Jow 8 per cent, and falling much fas ter than at present. - Despite this comparatively, rapid rate of decline, and a near-record seven years of expansion, the mini mum level of 5.9 per cent, reached in mid-1989, was higher than all but the . worst years of the '70s. . Moreover, the fall in unemploy ment this year has been due in large measure to a decline in participation rates. This implies that hidden unem ployment has risen as the Australian Bureau of .Statistics measure of un employment has falleiu Declining participation also implies that, despite the rhetoric of recovery and the record profit leyelS being en joyed by business, job-seekers are finding the market just as tough as it was in the depths of the recession. With the present slow rate of em ployment growth, it seems unlikely that unemployment will fall much be low 7 per cent in the course of the present expansion. In the event of a serious or even a moderate recession the stage will be set for yet another upward ratchet in the structural level of unemployment. The White Paper presented a pro jection showing that, if 4.75 per cent growth could be maintained until the year 2000, unemployment could be reduced to 5 per cent, that is to a lit tle below the level attained at the end of the expansion of the '80s, but this projection merely shows how improb able is a major reduction in unem ployment under current policies. IF ANYONE seriously believed that even 4 per cent growth for the rest of the century was a likely outcome of present policies, the pres ent debate over the deficit and debt reduction strategy would be pointless. Wjth such a long period of high growth, the Government would find it an easy matter to reduce its debt to record low levels, deliver the promised tax cuts, and meet such ad ditional obligations as the cost of compensation for native title. The debate over the deficit and debt is based on the assumption that the present period of growth will run for about six years, with the cyclical peak being reached around 1998. Once growth falls below about 2 per cent,'unemployment can be expected to resume, its upward trend. Can anything be done to prevent such a dismal outcome? It would, of course, be sufficient to ensure that the economy stayed permanently out of recession, but in the absence of startling innovations in macro-eco nomic policy there is no way of achieving this. The alternative is to make growth more employment-in tensive by focusing on those areas of the economy that provide the most jobs per unit of output. In essence, this means the service sector and, particularly, directly pro vided community services such as health, education and law and order. Unfortunately it is precisely these services that are being cut back un der the prevailing orthodoxy, fre quently referred to as economic ra tionalism . A large proportion of community services are in the public sector, and therefore continuation of rapid em ployment growth depends on expand ing public outlays, and therefore on a community willingness to accept higher levels of taxation. A major rea son for the growth of unemployment during the last two decades has been the severe restrictions on public out lays. Total Commonwealth funding for the states, the main providers of community services, has fallen from. 9.5 per cent of gross domestic product in the mid-'70s to 5.4 per cent now. This massive reduction is the main reason for the cutbacks to services that all state and territory govern ments have been forced to make. THE MEASURES announced in the White Paper will go some way towards reducing long-term un employment. However, in the absence of strong employment growth, this will simply amount to reshuffling the pack . Only by reversing the present contractionary orientation of policy, and accepting the need for improved community services at all levels, can such employment growth be generated in the long-term. John Quiggin is with the Centre lor Economic Policy Research, ANU, and the Department ol Economics, James Cook University.
  9. 1994-02-16 Article 134302359, score 12.680847 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   HARTLEY BOOTFFS,   BILL CLINTON,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations IRA,   CONSERVATIVE,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   SBS
    Locations NORTHERN IRELAND,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   UNITED STATES
    Momentum against Major The administration of Britain's Prime Minister, John Major, has been deeply hurt by the continuing sex scandals which have seen the political and in one case physical demise of no fewer than six of his Conservative colleagues in the past five months. The damage has been exacerbated by the fact that the scandals have emerged during his back to basics campaign which is designed to asso ciate the Conservative Party with so-called family values. Indeed, Mr Major's troubles have highlighted the dangers of any poli tical party wishing to make capital from issues of morality and personal behaviour. The effect, both in Brit ain and in the United States where right-wing preacher-politicians pan dered to the moral majority , was precisely the opposite from that which was intended: the movement was undermined by its association with hypocritical rogues. It is one thing for a politician to declare his attitudes and values to ward his own family as Prime Minis ter Paul Keating did in an SBS interview on Monday, evening; it is quite another to translate that into a party political program embracing his colleagues. That is, quite simply, asking for trouble and Mr Keating has been too long in the political game-to,fall into that trap. A govern ment may promote the concept of the family in its multifarious combinations by producing mea sures such as Australia's family pay ments scheme, but it must be based upon needs rather than some pre scriptive definition of the ideal fami ly. However, Mr Major's troubles go much deeper. He is now widely re garded as a weak and ineffective leader. A massive 64 per cent of re spondents to a recent poll rejected his back to basics approach. In foreign affairs, his relationship with United States President Bill Clinton has never recovered from the assis tance his Government was seen to give the Bush campaign concerning Mr Clinton's activities while at Ox ford. His negotiating stance on Northern Ireland has.not produced the intended breakthrough with the IRA. His policies on Bosnia-Herze govina are seen as indecisive. It is because of this perceived weakness that relatively minor indis cretions from the most recent politic al casualty Hartley Bootffs kissing and cuddling of his former research assistant can assume the stature of a scandal with the capacity to rock the Government. There conies a point in political life when a leader's demise develops a momen tum of its own. Mr Major appears to be approaching that critical point.
  10. 1994-11-12 Article 130537119, score 12.505171 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN BOWIE WILSON
    Organisations PASMINCO,   MIM,   CONGRESS,   NEWS CORP,   HAMBROS,   BHP,   HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,   WESTPAC,   TELSTRA CORP,   CRA,   ANZ,   NATIONAL AUSTRALIA BANK
    Locations MELBOURNE,   UNITED STATES,   NORTH AMERICA
    Misc REPUBLICANS,   WESTERN MINING DE CREASED,   AUSTRALIAN
    Market hits 14-month low as base metals bear brunt MELBOURNE: The Australian share market ended the week at a 14-month low after further sharp fall yesterday caused by a major sell-off of base metals stocks. Brokers said the negative senti ment was encouraged by a weak er bond market and stilted off shore bourses, resulting in sharply weaker resources and. de pressed industrial shares. It started out as a shabby Fri day and it just kept going throughout the day, an Ord Min nett broker said. The all-ordinaries index closed 19.3 points lower at 1952, its low est since September 24 last year when the index ended at 1946.5. Things certainly do look bleak and it's at that 1950 mark so you would want it to hold, Hambros broker John Bowie Wilson said in reference to a technical sup port level. The all-resources index de creased 20.9 points, or 1.56 per cent, to 1320.9, with BHP falling 24c to 19.20. BHP announced a US400 million steel mill joint venture in North America. The all-industrials index de creased 18.2 to 2799.3 with News Corp decreasing 14c to 5.56. The media giant announced a pay-TV joint venture with telecommuni cations carrier Telstra Corp. National turnover reached 220 million shares worth 670 million with falls leading rises by 448 to 271. Brokers said base metals stocks bore the brunt of selling pressure after recent gains. MIM decreased 4c to 2.59, Pasminco decreased 11c to 1.94, CRA decreased 30c to 17.90 and Western Mining de creased 20c or 2.53 per cent to 7.69. Elsewhere, buyers were side lined by a nervous US market which is still digesting the suc cess of the Republicans in gain ing control of the Congress and House of Representatives and the implications for US interest rates. Of the banks, Westpac de creased 2c to 4.24, ANZ de creased 9c to 3.72, the Common wealth was lc lower at 7.24. National Australia Bank defied the trend to close steady at 10.48.
  11. 1994-07-02 Article 118188235, score 12.432375 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN PRESCOTT
    Organisations TEJAS GAS CORP,   BHP TRANSPORT,   BHP CO LTD,   FOSTER'S BREWING GROUP LTD,   BHP,   NATIONAL AUSTRALIA R BANK LTD
    Locations MELBOURNE,   CHILE,   UNITED STATES,   PAPUA NEW GUINEA
    Misc OK TEDI,   BIG AUSTRALIAN
    BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Steel leads BHP to record profit MELBOURNE: Steel, backed by an Utile supporting cast, has played a star ring role to lead BHP Co Ltd to a re cord 1.28 billion annual profit. The result; announced yesterday, was 7.5 per ceiiti up on last year's 1.19 billion af ter abnormal items and. betters the 1.27 billion profit posted by the Big Australian In 1990-91. The profit was generally in line with market expectations, which' ranged from 1.15 billion to 1.33 billion. . BHP said the improvement demonstrated fthe strength of its spread of global busi nesses'. ' . However, the results also marked the re emergence of the steel division as a major profit contributor with a 66 per cent rise in post-abnormal net earnings to 537.1 mil lion from 323.2 million for the previous ]year. ; , Aided by the improving economic out look and the benefits of cost cutting, steel 'turned its first record production year since 1975. ' With its steel plants running at full ca pacity, BHP's steel sales hit a record 6.8 million tonnes and helped generate a 3.8 per cent rise in total group sales to 16.54 billion. Minerals remained BHP's dominant profit contributor, although higher ship ments of copper, iron ore. thermal coal and manganese, and better exchange and tax rates, were, not enough to offset the ne gative impact of higher contract prices for most commodities. The division's profit of 681.7 million was'.marginally better , than most forecasts but still down on the previous year's 738.2 million. None the less, BHP chief executive John Prescott was impressed, describing miner als' performance as outstanding in the context of the recession in their world mar kets and the lower prices . He said the group would be hoping for further rises in the strengthening copper price to support increased production of' the metal from the Escondida and Ok Tedi mines in Chile and Papua New Guinea re spectively. However, he emphasised BHP would continue to diversify its minerals portfolio in order to reduce the impact of the com modity price cycle. Earnings by the other major division, petroleum, held up relatively well, given a 20 per cent fall in BHP's realised US oil price. Petroleum profit fell nearly 2 per cent to S500.6 million, but the result was aided by favourable exchange rates and a profit on the sale of BHP's remaining investment in Tejas Gas Corp in the US. Elsewhere, higher earnings by BHP Transport and some S71.1 million of divi dends from BHP's 37 per cent sharehold ing in Foster's Brewing Group Ltd lifted profits from BHP's service companies, to 135.7 million from 85.8 million. Foreign currency transactions by the treasury operations was largely responsible for a blow-out in the loss on corporate and unallocated items to 128.4 million from 63.3 million. Despite the result, BHP shares finished 1.3 per cent, or 24c, lower at 17.74 after earlier trading at 17.60. However, share traders said the fall was due largely to negative market sentiment on the back of Thursday night's sell-off on Wall Street. They drew parallels with the market's lukewarm response to National Australia r Bank Ltd's May annpuncement of an im pressive interim net profit of 868.8 million which, like the BHP result, had not been unexpected.
  12. 1994-07-14 Article 118190877, score 12.374911 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN MAITLAND,   JOHN MAIT,   BOB FLEW,   MAIT JLAND
    Organisations BHP CO LTD,   UNITED MINEWORK ERS FEDERATION,   BHP,   AUSTRALIA COAL,   NATIONAL PRESS CLUB,   UNITED MINEWORKERS
    Locations MELBOURNE,   TOKYO,   AUSTRALIA,   AUSTRA,   BRIS,   JAPAN
    Misc LIBERAL,   JAPANESE,   AUSTRALIAN
    BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Coal 'rabble' irks union Australia's coal industry was being ripped off' by Japanese coal importers' because of a poor export strategy within the industry, the United Minework ers Federation said yesterday. .Federation president John Mait and said Australia's major coal producers were like a rabble in their efforts to sell Australian coal to the Japanese. Australia's No 1 export indus try, coal, is in crisis because of the lack of team-work by Australian coal producers, Mr Maitland told ) National Press Club lunch. ''Because of the lack of team Work ' we are being systematically ripped off. Our side goes over to Tokyo every year and acts like a rabble without a coach and with at least 10 different selling agents. 'This resulted in falling prices ev ery year. - The coal rule book should em phasise team work, the same team .work style used by the Japanese coal buyers, he said. He said the Government should offer incentives to improve co -operation within the coal industry. .. o.In a statement issued in Bris bane, BHP. Australia Coal's group ,'gfeneral manager Bob Flew said he iwas disappointed with Mr Mait jland's attack on coal companies and their customers. Mr Flew said the criticism could only be' counterproductive and could well jeopardise rather than strengthen Mr Maitland's push for job securi ty in the coal industry. After two coal miners', strikes earlier this year over falling prices, the Government announced an in quiry into coal pricing. First sub missions are due this month. Mr Maitland said miners would campaign against some federal La bor MPs in marginal seats if the outcome of the inquiry was not favourable to the industry. He said the union would pres sure federal MPs in electorates where their selection relied heavily on the commitment of organisa tions like our own . Mr Maitland said concern over low prices paid by Japan for Aus tralian coal had sparked the need for a cohesive plan to combat the Japanese buyers. We!have no intention of being soft in this area it is a case of us fighting for the survival of our communities, he said. We are really going to push this issue right through and we are making it clear to the government that we want to reach some under standing with them. If they don't give us the oppor tunity to do that then they will be United Mineworkers' leader John Maitland: producers lack teamwork. the ones who are responsible for influencing the attitudes of people within those electorates. The union's plan , for achieving higher prices for Australian coal in Japan includes: , greater government influence on export contracts; a coordinated export strategy by Australian coal producers; penalties against Japanese companies using advantageous non-commercial investments and soft-financing techniques here; and government measures to ensure any changes to Australia's export strategy do not cause panic among buyers. The present Labor government was failing to support the coal in dustry and it was probable the in dustry would be better off under a Liberal government, he said. [The Fraser Liberal govern ment] was very much supportive of the government using its powers for approval of contracts, he said. MELBOURNE: Improving market conditions have reinforced hopes of increased coal exports in 1994-95 by BHP Co Ltd's Austra lian coal unit, the company said yesterday. Issuing its annual operations re port for the May year, BHP Aus tralia Coal said demand for high quality seaborne traded coking coal should remain strong in the latest year, despite an expected fall in deliveries to Japan. However, while Japanese steel mills had estimated crude steel production for the Japanese year to March 31 , 1995 would fall six million tonnes on last year to 92 million tonnes, recent forecasts suggested last year's 98 million tonnes may yet be achieved, it said.
  13. 1994-12-27 Article 127262781, score 12.3086815 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALBERT REYN,   AL EXANDER DOWNER,   QUEEN VICTORIA,   KENNETH CLARKE,   JOHN BRU,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN MAJOR MALCOLM BOOKER,   HELMUT KOHL
    Organisations IRA,   EUROPEAN UNION,   PARLIAMENT,   ROYAL FAMILY,   IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY,   CONSERVA TIVE PARTY,   SINN FEIN,   STORMONT CASTLE
    Locations REPUBLIC OF IRELAND,   NORTHERN IRELAND,   EU ROPEAN UNION,   BRITAIN,   BELFAST,   EUROPE,   UNITED STATES,   GERMANY,   NORWAY
    Misc FRENCH,   CATHOLICS,   GERMAN,   EURO PEAN,   IRISH,   EUROPEAN,   ANTI-EURO,   EXCHEQUER,   NORWEGIANS,   BRITISH
    The undoing of John Major Malcolm Booker THE CONSERVATIVE lead ers in Britain, as in Aus tralia, have withdrawn with relief into the Christmas holiday period. The Prime Minister, John Major, has had a bad ' year and his leadership has been repeatedly under threat. Like Al exander Downer, he may wonder how long he will survive in the new year. Not all his problems have been his own fault. Ministers in his Government have been involved in bizarre sex scandals and have been obliged to resign. Normally in Britain such things are shrugged off by the ordinary pub lic. They have been part of Brit ish politics for hundreds of years, ranging from the homosexual King James I to Queen Victoria's obsession with horse grooms to the current antics of the younger members of the Royal Family. Even when members of the government have been involved the prime minister has usually been able to carry on without much difficulty. In Mr Major's case, however, they have been used as another stick to beat him with, and he is pictured as a leader without moral authority in his own party. Perhaps the greatest irony is that Mr Major is given little cred it for having set in train a pro cess that may end the conflict be I ' tween Protestants and Catholics that has shamed the people of Ire land for generations. A year ago he persuaded the Government of the Republic of Ireland to join with, his own in launching a peace process in which the Sinn Fein, the political wing of the .Irish Republican Army, agree to participate. At first the leader, Jerry Ad ams,'balked, and put'.forward a long list of conditions. They were eventually met by the British Government and the IRA' agreed to renounce the use of violence. Meetings were begun this month between the British and Irish authorities and the Sinn Fein in Stormont Castle, the building which was once the sym bol of British rule in the pro vince. They were interrupted by the unexpected fall of the Irish Government led by Albert Reyn olds, but his successor, John Bru ton, has promised to carry oh the process. Public bickering continues on both sides, but the meetings so far have been described as busi ness-like and constructive, and there is guarded optimism that a settlement will at last be achieved. There is also hope that international funds will be avail able. particularly from the United States, to rebuild the crippled economy of Northern Ireland. Meanwhile, the people of Belfast have enjoyed the first peaceful Christmas for 25 years. The issue that has overshad owed all John Major's good works and brought his Govern ment to the brink of collapse has been Britain's relationship with Europe. A substantial group in his own party still oppose the Eu ropean Union, and eight members were recently suspended for re fusing to support a measure for closer integration. The result has been that he no I John Major: his good work has been overshadowed. longer commands a secure major ity in Parliament and his Chan cellor of the Exchequer, Kenneth Clarke, has been forced to with draw a proposal included in his current mini-budget for an in crease in the value added tax. The main reason why the Gov ernment has not been voted out of office appears to be that the public-opinion polls show that La bour leads by 61 points to 21. Conservative Members realise that if an election were held in the near .future many of them would lose their seats. The objections of the anti-Euro pean members of the Conserva tive Party are based on their fear that the European Union will ul timately become a European fed eration in which Britain will be deprived of its independence. This idea is. however, rapidly losing its relevance. It was most ly in the mind of the German Chancellor, Helmut Kohl, and it is doubtful that it ever had any real substance. Even the German people no longer relish the idea that they might have to share the burdens of the less robust Euro pean economies. They are in creasingly preoccupied with re storing their historical dominance of central and eastern Europe, and are disinclined to ac cept. Hitherto the strength of the Eu ropean Union has been the close alliance between France'and Ger many. This is steadily weakening. The French no longer believe that Germany can be kept under control through such an alliance, and are increasingly seeing them selves as a focus of a balancing group of countries in western and southern Europe. They are even ready to contemplate'including Britain, in such a group. The likely development there fore is not towards a federal Eu rope but to the re-establishment of a competitive balance between east and west. The contemplated addition to the European Union of many new countries, most of which will be located in the east, will be likely to hasten this pro cess. In the past, such competition has led to war but, with luck, it will in future be conducted pure ly in the economic arena. Also, with luck, the whole of the conti nent will be an area of relative free trade. Whether it will remain a protective bloc vis-a-vis the rest of the world is still an open ques tion. The recent refusal of Norway to join the European Union may be a pointer to the future. The Norwegians have always looked to the .wide.r world rather than to the continent, and they still see this as offering the best prospects for their country. The British who feel likewise may yet be proved right.
  14. 1994-09-22 Article 118139362, score 12.171352 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People PETER COLLINS,   BOB CARR,   JOHN FAHEY
    Organisations STATE BANK OF NSW,   HERALD,   WESTPAC,   STATE BANK,   LABOR PARTY,   ANZ,   NATIONAL AUSTRALIA BANK,   SLATE BANK
    Locations SYDNEY,   SYDNEY MMIIINY
    State Bank sale to be finalised soon SYDNEY: The sale of the State Bank of NSW had not been finalised but an announcement would be made soon. Premier John Fahey told Parlia ment yesterday afternoon. We've met to examine the details of the offer, the proposal, in respect to the State Bank's possible sale, Mr Fahey said. Those details have not yet been fi nalised when they are the Govern ment will announce its intentions for the future of the Slate Bank. A decision was expected yesterday after weekend newspaper reports an nounced legislation to allow the sale of the Government's asset the nation's fifth largest bank would be intro duced yesterday. Treasurer Peter Collins was silent about the sale this week. His last official comment was last Thursday, when he said he would in troduce the legislation before the end of the month. The sole buyer has not been publicly identified, although it is widely believed to be Colonial Mutual Life. The sale price has also not been dis closed but is tipped to fall between S400 million and 600 million. The State Bank has assets of SI8 bil lion but also has contingent liabilities, or potential debt, of S19 billion. Yesterday. Leader of the Opposition Bob Carr said lie agreed with the l:ah cy Government that the lour major banks National Australia Bank. Westpac. Commonwealth and ANZ - should have been kept out of the sale of the State Bank. lie said the Labor Party was at odds with the Government over the timing of the sale. Now is simply not the time to sell it. Core Government services ought lo remain in the public sector. It should be sold at a time and a way that maximises the return to the people of this state. Mr Carr said. The Government announced last No vember it would sell the State Bank. A report in The Sydney Mmiiiny, Herald yesterday said the Government ignored an assessment report by lead ing corporate adviser. Bankers Trust, prepared in October -which said the four major banks should have luen able to bid. This would have improved the pro spects of a sale on reasonable terms even if the ultimate buyer is not a ma jor trading bank , the report said. It warned if the Government decided to exclude the four majors it might have to retain a substantial risk expo sure to the State Bank in order to complete the sale.
  15. 1994-11-14 Article 130537710, score 12.116682 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People PATRICK MAYHEW,   ALBERT REYNOLDS,   HARRY WHELEHAN,   MARTIN MCGUINNESS,   DICK SPRING,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations AP,   LABOR PARTY,   COALITION GOVERNMENT,   IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY,   FIANNA FAIL PARTY,   SINN FEIN,   LABOUR
    Locations NORTHERN IRELAND,   BRITAIN,   IRISH REPUBLIC,   IRELAND,   DUBLIN
    Misc BRITISH-RULED,   WHELE HAN
    Fears for peace push DUBLIN, Sunday: A dispute in the Irish Republic's Coalition Government yesterday raised, concerns for the Northern Ire land peace process. The pace of progress, toward peace in the British-ruled pro vince could be slowed, it was feared, if the Government of Prime Minister Albert Reynolds were to fall and be replaced. The dispute concerns Mr Reynolds's appointment of for mer Attorney-General Harry Whelehan as President of the High Court. Deputy Prime Minister Dick Spring regards Mr Whelehan as too conservative on social is sues such as divorce. Mr Reynolds, leader of the Fianna Fail Party, has governed in coalition with Mr Spring's Labor Party since January, 1993. Martin McGuinness, a senior official of Sinn Fein, the politic al party that supports the Irish Republican Army, said yester day that he saw the possibility of a general election in Ireland as a worrying development. Mr Spring led his five minis terial colleagues out of a Cabi net meeting on Friday when it became clear Mr Reynolds would press on with the Whele han nomination. Mr Spring has called a meet ing of his party today to decide its next move. Britain's Northern Ireland Se cretary Sir Patrick Mayhew is scheduled to talk with Mr Spring in Dublin tomorrow about Northern Ireland and the peace process. Political sources said Labour could decide to pull out of the Government, leaving Mr Reyn olds either to call fresh general elections or try to push ahead with a minority Government. A collapse of the Government or a lengthy period of limbo could slow the pace of what both Mr Reynolds and the Brit ish Prime Minister, John Major, have said is the best chance of peace for decades. - AP
  16. 1994-08-27 Article 118265132, score 12.05197 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN MASSEY,   ANTHONY EVERINGHAM
    Organisations QDL LTD,   COOK COLLIERY,   BUDERIM GINGER LTD,   WESTERN SUPPLY COMPANY,   AURORA GOLD LTD,   ASHTON MINING LTD,   OAKBRIDGE,   OAKBRIDGE LTD
    Locations SUNSHINE COAST,   MELBOURNE,   SYDNEY,   PERTH,   VICTORIA BRISBANE,   INDONE,   AURORA,   MOUNT MURO
    Misc QUIRK,   WESTERN,   VICTORIAN,   SI
    IN BRIEF QDL expands into Victoria BRISBANE: Pharmaceutical whole- - salcr and distributor QDL Ltd has made its first move into the Victorian market by buying the Melbourne based wholesaler Western Supply Company. Chief executive John Massey said Western was a prosperous company which supplied more than 200 retail pharmacies within Melbourne's metro politan area and stocked major phar maceutical supplier lines. He said the purchase would add an estimated S30 million in sales revenue to QDL, representing about 10 per cent of its expected sales figure of 320 million for this year. QDL's aim is to become a major national pharmaceutical wholesaler and the purchase of Western Supply Company has provided us with an op portunity to commence this expan sion, Mr Massey said in a statement. Western would continue to operate under the management of its founders, the Quirk family. Oakbridge hit SYDNEY: Shares in Oakbridge Ltd fell sharply yesterday after the com pany announced an interim net loss of S2.9 million because of lower output and weaker coal prices. The loss compared with a previous profit of SI90,000 and was struck on a 6 per cent fall in sales to S243.03 million. . The company's stock closed 7c down at 83c. The bottom line loss was cushioned by an abnormal gain of S6.29 million from the sale of its Cook Colliery. No, interim dividend was declared. Strong sales BRISBANE: Higher domestic and international sales helped Buderim Ginger Ltd to post a 43 per cent rise in interim profit to S460.000. The ginger processor, which oper ates a S5 million plant and tourist at traction on the Sunshine Coast and exports ginger products to 17 coun tries, recorded a 36.7 per cent rise in sales revenue for the June half to S7.94 million. Chairman Anthony Everingham said, We feel the final half will be strong, things are very positive . Maiden profit PERTH: Aurora Gold Ltd has posted an inaugural net interim profit of SI.24 million and said it is on track for an October start-up of its Mount Muro gold project in Indone sia. Aurora, which was floated off with the non-diamond interests of Ashton Mining Ltd last year, said sales for the half year totalled SI6.92 million. Gold production for the period was 29,069 ounces and the average realised gold price was S584 per ounce.
  17. 1994-05-17 Article 118212017, score 12.007587 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NANCY WAKE,   MARION FRITH,   BRUCE RUXTON,   CROIX DE GUERRE,   DAVID JONES,   DIGGER JAMES,   MRS WAKE-FORWARD
    Organisations RSL,   TATTERSALLS,   THE CANBERRA TIMES,   SOTHEBY,   VICTORIAN RSL,   SERVICES LEAGUE,   CROIX DE GUERRE
    Locations MELBOURNE,   AUSTRALIA,   PORT MACQUARIE,   AUSTRA
    Misc WORLD WAR II
    Elated RSL wins battle for Wake's war medals By MARION FRITH A jubilant Returned and Services League last night secured World War II heroine Nancy Wake's war medals for 156,500, with Tattersalls pledg ing to make up the shortfall, in a frenzy of phenomenal bidding at Sotheby's, Melbourne. I've always thought of winning the lottery, the national president of the RSL, Major-General Digger James, said on being told of the victory by The Canberra Times. I never thought it would be like this. It's wonderful. I'm so terribly thrilled. General James said donations to the RSL's VC and Historic Medal Funds had poured in during the day, with many, many people giving rela tively small amounts . The medals will now go on display at the Austra lian War Memorial. A spokesman for Sotheby's said bidding in the packed auction room had escalated rapidly from the open ing of just under 30,000, with the final bid well exceeding expectations. It had been thought the nine medals which included the Croix de Guerre with Palm and Bar, the Croix de Guerre with'Star and the George Medal would fetched between 40,000 and 60,000. The chief executive of Tattersalls, David Jones, who will donate an as yet-uncertain amount that is the short fall between public donations and the 156,500, said the main thing was that the medals would now remain in Australia. Nancy Wake herself, now 81-year old Mrs Wake-Forward, the coura geous young fighter with the French Resistance who helped more than 1000 allied soldiers escape to freedom, was unavailable for comment last night. Her husband, John, said from their Port Macquarie home, she had gone to ground . She's off in the hills somewhere, he said. Bruce Ruxton, Victorian RSL president, after the auction of Nancy Wake's war medals in Melbourne last night.
  18. 1994-08-05 Article 118260476, score 11.940079 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN HALFPENNY,   MIKE TAYLOR,   REG HAMILTON
    Organisations VICTORIAN TRADES HALL COUNCIL,   IRC,   AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY,   ACTU
    Locations AUSTRALIA,   AUSTRA
    Misc VICTO RIAN GOVERNMENT,   BOXING,   ANZAC,   AUSTRALIA,   VICTORIAN,   VICTORIAN GOVERN,   AUSTRALIAN
    IRC decision gives all workers on federal awards 11 public holidays a year By MIKE TAYLOR, National Affairs Writer In an important decision for workers in the ACT, the Austra lian Industrial Relations Commis sion has ruled that federal award workers arc entitled to a minimum of 11 public holidays a year. It has also ruled that federal award workers should be entitled to alternative days off when public holidays fall on weekends. The decision, which was lament ed yesterday by Australia's major employer organisations and con servative state Governments, has effectively put an end to moves to drop public holidays when they fall on weekends. It also puts paid to employer suggestions that the Queen's Birthday should be dropped as a public holiday in Australia. The IRC ruled that Australian workers under federal awards should be entitled to 10 public hol idays plus one extra day which could be nominated by state and territory Governments. This means workers will be en titled to days off for New Year's Day, Good Friday, Easter Satur day, Easter Monday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day, Australia Day, Anzac Day, Queen's Birthday and Labour Day. They will also be entitled to at least one day's public holiday as determined by state Governments, such as Show Day. A full Bench of the IRC ruled on the public holidays question as a result of a case put by the Victo rian Government in an attempt to validate its controversial Public Holidays Act. The, state legislation would have meant the certain loss of all public holidays which fell on weekends, and had been challenged by the ACTU and the Victorian Trades Hall Council. The Victorian Government case was substantially backed by the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, which argued that public holidays should be a matter for state Governments to determine and that make-up days for public holidays which fell on weekends were inappropriate. A spokesman for the chamber, Reg Hamilton, said yesterday that his organisa tion was disappointed with the full Bench decision. We maintain that the question of public holidays should be a mat ter for state Governments to deter mine, he said. Mr Hamilton said employers maintained their belief that taking extra days off when public holi days fell on weekends was inappro priate and hampered Australia's international competitiveness. However, the secretary of the Victorian Trades Hall Council, John Halfpenny, welcomed the commission's decision as a crush ing defeat for the Victorian Gov ernment and those who had supported it. He said the Victorian Govern ' ment had tried to deny Victorian workers some of their long-held entitlements. The commission's decision will not apply to workers in state in dustrial jurisdictions, but all work ers in the ACT are employed under federal awards and now have in assured entitlement to at least 10 public holidays a year plus any extra day the ACT Government might choose to nominate.
  19. 1994-05-08 Article 118210252, score 11.904416 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN PAUL II,   GERALD FORD,   MARGARET MCLNTYRE,   WILLIAM MCKELL,   WILLIAM SLIM,   J. C. WATSON,   SHEIK MOHAMMED ABDULLAH,   MAURICE GUILLAUX
    Organisations FEDERAL LABOR PARTY,   UNITED NATIONS,   DUKE
    Locations PORT ARTHUR,   FRANCE,   CAPE TOWN,   PORTUGAL,   SOUTH VIETNAM,   LONDON,   PRUSSIA,   TURKEY,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   NEW DELHI,   ASIA,   MARLBOROUGH,   CHINA,   RUSSIA,   AUSTRIA,   EUROPE,   KASHMIR,   SOUTH KOREA,   SWEDEN,   DENMARK,   AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND,   GREECE,   UNITED STATES,   JAPAN,   LIAO TUNG PENINSULA,   WELLINGTON,   ESTONIA
    Misc COMMUNISTS,   SOVIET SOCIAL,   FRENCH,   MUSLIMS,   SERB-LED,   SERBS,   BOSNIAN,   YUGOSLAV,   VIETNAM WAR,   AUSTRALIA-WIDE,   WORLD WAR I.,   AMERICAN,   WORLD WAR II,   BRITISH
    HISTORY Highlights in history on May 8: 1704: British forces under Duke of Marlborough begin march to Dan ube. 1789: HMS Sirius returns to Sydney from Cape Town with provisions. 1811: Duke of Wellington defeats French at Fuentes d'Ontro, Portugal. 1852: Integrity of Denmark guaranteed through Treaty of London by Brit ain, France, Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden. 1895: Japan surrenders Liao Tung Peninsula and Port Arthur to China in return for huge indemnity. 1897: Greece asks major powers to in tervene in its war with Turkey. 1901: Federal Labor Party founded in Australia with J. C. Watson as lead er. 1914: First seaplane flown in Australia by Maurice Guillaux in Sydney. 1916: Australia-New Zealand forces ar rive in France during World War I. 1921: Capital punishment abolished in Sweden. 1945: Victory in Europe, V-E Day, proclaimed in World War II. 1948: Margaret Mclntyre becomes first woman elected to Tasmanian Parlia ment. 1953: Sir William Slim succeeds Sir William McKell as Governor-General of Australia. 1965: Sheik Mohammed Abdullah, leader of Muslims in Kashmir, ar rested during stopover in New Delhi. 1970: Australia-wide peace marches protest participation in Vietnam War. 1975: US President Gerald Ford reaf firms American military support of South Korea in his campaign to reas sure US allies in Asia after fall of South Vietnam to Communists. 1988: Pope John Paul II, visiting Uru guay, voices strong support for la bour unions. 1990: Estonia declares itself a republic and drops the words Soviet Social ist from its name. 1992: 40 top Yugoslav officers are ousted in an effort to purge Serb-led federal forces. 1993: Bosnian Government and rebel Serbs agree on a nation-wide cease fire, and ask UN troops to leave the republic to clear the way for lifting an international arms embargo.
  20. 1994-11-06 Article 130535835, score 11.736137 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN HILTON,   JOHN KALDOR,   CATHERINE HANSON,   JOHAN DUFLOU
    Organisations HIV EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL RESEARCH,   NATIONAL CENTRE,   NSW INSTITUTE OF FORENSIC MEDI CINE,   MCGILL UNIVERSITY
    Locations SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   CANADA
    Misc AIDS,   AUSTRAL ASIAN SOCIETY,   CANADIAN,   GOVERN,   ABORIGINES,   HUMAN TISSUES ACT,   HIV
    AIDS patients 'incorrectly' diagnosed By CATRIONA BONFIGLIOLI, AAP Medical Correspondent SYDNEY: Two in five AIDS patients had not had all their AIDS-related illnesses correct ly diagnosed before they died, a study of 103 post mortem examinations has found. However, since 1992, close coop eration between doctors and pathologists had significantly re duced the major differences be tween illnesses recognised before the patients died and those identi fied after death, the study found. The deputy director of the NSW Institute of Forensic Medi cine, Johan Duflou, yesterday told an HIV/AIDS experts' meet ing in Sydney, that in 1992 doc tors and pathologists agreed on diagnoses in less than one in five of 35 patients after autopsy. In 1992, there were major diag nostic discrepancies in 46 per cent of cases, compared with 38 per cent of the 103 cases exam ined up to 1994, he told the sixth annual conference of the Austral asian Society for HIV Medicine. Autopsies of HIV-positive pa tients coupled with regular clini co-pathological review are crucial to improving the management of this challenging disease com plex, he wrote in his conference paper, co-authored by institute head, Professor John Hilton. Alerting doctors to missed ill nesses had in part contributed to better diagnoses and treatment of difficult-to-diagnose diseases, they ' said. y: Although this improvement is gratifying, it is obvious that HIV' infection and its associated patho logy continues to cause major di agnostic difficulties amongst cli nicians. Dr Duflou said 43 autopsies had been performed as part of coro nial investigations and 60 were occurred with patient or rela tives' consent as non-coronial ex aminations under the Human Tissues Act. Heroin or other opiate injec tions caused 14 per cent of the 103 deaths; two people died as a result of therapeutic misadven ture; and 72 died naturally. A'Sydney AIDS expert on Fri day said the number of AIDS cases had almost reached, its peak and the number of new HIV in fections was lower than predict ed. Preliminary findings of an ana lysis of HIV and AIDS incidence showed AIDS cases would reach their highest levels in 1994-1995 and plateau-out to about 900 cases a year, Dr John Kaldor said. If the HIV infection rate doesn't change, then AIDS should peak within the next couple of years, Dr Kaldor, deputy direc tor of the Sydney-based National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, said. The upcoming peak of AIDS cases followed the peak in HIV infections, which reached more than 700 cases a quarter in 1983. At the same conference, a Ca nadian expert warned that the failure to provide clean needles to prisoners, who injected drugs, made prisons giant shooting gal leries of needle-sharers, increas ing the risk of spreading the AIDS virus. A public health ex pert from McGill University, as sociate professor Dr Catherine Hanson, said Canadian prisons did not have needle-exchange pro grams despite the fact injecting drug users (IDUs) had much higher rates of HIV than non-I DUs. We create a giant shooting gallery ... [where] people share with far more people ... because of the penury of injecting equip ment, Dr Hanson said yesterday. We have to recognise that our supply-side efforts are not work ing, there are drugs that are get ting into prison. Turning a blind eye to it is negligent It won't be long before we have an inmate who can actually bring ... authorities to court over exactly that [exposure to risk]. Dr Hanson said prisoners were under the care of the Govern ment, which should provide safe living conditions. Any failure to protect prisoners would fall most heavily on Ab origines as, both in Canada and Australia, Aborigines are over-re presented in the prison popula tion. Dr Hanson suggested that Aus tralian prison officers' unions contacted Canadian prison offi cers to gauge their reaction to the successful introduction of condoms into most Canadian pris ons. It is a major non-event from the point of view of the prison authorities, and the guards, she said.
  21. 1994-10-01 Article 118288613, score 11.632654 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOE CAHILL,   MI CHAEL EGAN,   PETER SMEDLEY,   PETER COLLINS,   JOHN HATTON
    Organisations STATE BANK OF NSW,   STALE BANK,   COLONIAL MUTUAL LIFE,   STATE BANK,   CML,   FINANCE SECTOR UNION STATE BANK,   NSW PARLIA
    Locations SYDNEY
    Misc BIG
    BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT ; i, Colonial Mutual rejects State Bank sell-off claims SYDNEY: The prospective purchaser of the State Bank of NSW, Colonial Mutual Life, has rejected suggestions that it will off-load the bank after three years to one of the Big Four banks. Colonial's managing director, Peter Smedley, said yesterday that his com pany had been in the insurance industry for 123 years and expected to be in banking for just as long. Colonial is purchasing the State Bank for the purpose of entering the banking business for the long term, he said. The state Opposition and independent MP John Hatton have claimed CML - will sell the Stale Bank to one of the Big Four at the end of the compulsory three-year retention period. Opposition finance spokesman Mi chael Egan said yesterday that jobs would be shed and branches would be closed if a major bank acquired the State Bank. The sale conditions relating to re sale restrictions and maintenance of staff and distribution network apply for only three years, Mr Egan said. After that it is open slather. He also said the major banks should .have been allowed to bid for the State Bank. 1 The Government announced on Thursday that it intends selling the State Bank to CML for 576.5 million. However, legislation to enable the sale must be passed by the NSW Parlia ment. The sale conditions guarantee that staff numbers, which currently total 4800, cannot fall below 4300 for three years and the number of branches, now 293, must stay above 260 in that peri od. CML's Mr Smedley said the pro spects for the bank and staff under ; iis company's ownership would be as' good as they were under government control, if not better. Treasurer Peter Collins said yester day that State Bank staff would be supporting the sale. But the staff union of the bank de scribed the planned sale price as laughable and said it was unhappy that there was only a three-year guar antee on job numbers. Finance Sector Union State Bank branch secretary Joe Cahill said the union would be expressing its concerns in upcoming meetings jwith management. It is just laughable tb'sell.it for that, Mr Cahill said of the agreed price. It is certainly worth Considerably more. The bank has been-through res tructuring and is now a very attractive vehicle. We're not happy with only a three year guarantee for jobs. Earlier yesterday, Mr Collins said he believed CML was not planning to sell the State Bank in the short term and the company was not trying to buy it as some sort of overnight publicity stunt . They're doing this as a major shift in (heir commercial activities. CML has made it clear that they're going into banking for keeps, he said. Mr Collins said CML would need the permission of the federal Treasurer if it wanted to sell the bank at the end of three years. The chance of the federal Treasurer consenting to any sale is fairly remote because the federal Treasurer would take a fairly dim view of further strengthening of the monopolistic pow ers of the Big Four, he said.
  22. 1994-10-22 Article 118293215, score 11.582742 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People TIM SMITH,   MR MAJOR,   GRAHAM RIDDICK,   MR SMITH,   DAVID HENCKE,   IAN GREER,   MOHAMED AL-FAYED,   PETER PRESTON,   ROBIN BUTLER,   MICHAEL WHITE,   NEIL HAMILTON,   JOHN MAJOR,   TONY BLAIR,   DAVID TREDINNICK
    Organisations SUNDAY TIMES,   CABINET,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   THE GUARDIAN,   HARRODS,   COMMONS' PRIVILEGES COMMITTEE
    Locations LONDON,   NORTHERN IRELAND
    Misc TORY,   COMMONS,   GUARDIAN,   BRITISH,   REGISTER OF MEMBERS
    INTERNATIONAL Major on the ropes as bribery claim Minister resigns By MICHAEL WHITE LONDON, Friday: Prime Minister John Major's Government was on the ropes over the sleaze factor again last night after one of the two ministers accused of taking cash for questions in the Commons resigned his post while the other loudly protested his innocence won Downing Street's backing to fight back in the courts. To complicate the fall out from yesterday's revelations in The Guardian that Tim Smith and Neil Hamilton received up to 2000 ( A4300) a time to ask par- liamentary questions during the controversy over the ownership of Harrods (the London luxury department store which enjoys the custom of the British royal family), Mr Major hinted that he had been offered an unspecified ar- rangement which might have prevented the affair becoming public. As Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs pounced on the lastest twist to the long-running sleaze saga and demanded action to curb dubious ethical practices in governing circles, Mr Major revealed that three weeks ago he ordered the Cabinet Secretary to investigate allegations made - via a-middle man - by Harrods' owner Mohamed Al-Fayed. Downing Street officials were telling reporters that the results of Sir Robin Butler's informal inquiry would have teen made known by tonight - regardless of The Guardian's coincidental revelations - when news broke that Mr Smith, a junior Northern Ireland minister since 1992, had resigned. The more combative Mr Hamilton, a junior Trade Minister responsible for business probity, denied any impropriety and in office. Last night, Tory MPs were sharply divided about the wisdom of letting him defend his reputation while still a minister. Some claimed that Mr Major had forgotten the lessons he learned the hard way during the run of sex scandals in 1993-94 when only instant resignation provided effective damage limitation. But Mr Hamilton and the Westminster parliamentary lobbyist. Ian Greer, who acted for Mr Al-Fayed during his protracted battle with Lonrho for control of Harrods, announced they would be suing The Guardian, its editor Peter Preston and reporter David Hencke for libel. The Labour Leader, Tony Blair, moved quickly to exploit the latest ministerial discomfort. In an effective intervention in the House of Commons, Mr Blair demanded three steps to make good Mr Major's repeated claims that he would tolerate nothing but the highest standards-of behaviour in public life. He asked that no minister who has privatised a company should-subsequent- ly end up on its board as the likes of Lord Tebbit and Lord Young have done; that a list of all 'quango' members, their fees and political affiliations be published; and that the cash for questions inquiry now be broadened, be made deeper, be held in public and be made fully independent . Mr Major had arrived with a prepared response. Like many of his backbench and ministerial colleagues he warned against unsubstantiated allegations and said he was already working on both the question of quango ap- pointments and the allegations against the two ministers, which are broadly, parallel to the charges made by the Sunday Times against two ministerial PPSs. David Tredinnick and Graham Riddick both resigned pending the Commons' Privileges Committee's inquiry. But what startled listening MPs was Mr Major's opening observation that the allegations - broadly similar to The Guardian's - and brought to him privately and three weeks before indirectly from Mr Al-Fayed. I made it absolutely clear at that time that I was riot prepared to come to any arrangement with Mr AI-Fayed. I made it perfectly clear that these matters would be fully investigated and 1 immediately asked the Cabinet Secretary to undertake an independent and full investigation. Senior officials stressed that whereas Mr Smith had admitted a business relationship with Mr Al-Fayed in 19S6-89 , had not been recorded in the Register of Members' Interests and offered both his resignation and profound apologies to Mr Major. Mr Hamilton had denied wrongdoing in a letter to Mr Major. - The Guardian
  23. 1994-06-29 Article 118174863, score 11.351822 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JEANLUC DEHAENE,   PAUL KEATING,   PETER SUTHERLAND,   JACQUES DELORS,   JEAN-LUC DEHAENE
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION,   EUROPEAN COMMISSION,   GATT,   BRITISH PRESS
    Locations FRANCE,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   HOLLYWOOD,   EUROPE,   CORFU,   IRELAND,   GERMANY
    Misc AMERICANS,   BELGIANS,   FRENCH,   BRITONS,   BELGIAN,   EUROPEAN,   GERMANS,   PARIS-BONN AXIS,   BRITISH
    Major's fortunes turn around JOHN MAJOR must be almost unable, to believe his luck. In a single stroke he has stood up for Britain , enraged the French, frustrated the Germans and insulted the Belgians. He could hardly have designed a better ploy to appeal to his fellow Britons. And indeed he is being hailed in the British Press as a strong leader and execrated in the French media as Thatcher without a handbag . Already his Tory backbench is saying that his previously shaky hold on the Prime Minister ship has firmed substantially. The cause of this remarkable turnaround in Mr Major's fortunes was his weekend veto of Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene for the post of president of the European Commission when France's Jacques Delors retires next January. Britain stood out against its 11 co-members of the European Union and has forced them to start the process again. The burden will fall principally on Germany which takes over the rotating presidency of the union as opposed to the commission which actually runs the European bureaucracy and is re- sponsible for producing an acceptable chief executive. Mr Major's actions might have had a touch of domestic political calculation in them. He is, after all, a politician who won his own unwinnable election well before Paul Keating followed suit. But the main reason for Britain's rejecting JeanLuc Dehaene goes to the heart of the conceptual framework within which the European Union will develop. Dehaene was not simply the the choice of the Paris-Bonn axis, he was the only choice they would countenance. Moreover, neither President Mitterrand nor Chancellor Kohl deigned to go through the usual diplomatic niceties to gain support before the Corfu meeting. Also, the Belgian Prime Minister is known to favour a more centralised Europe than the British who see the union developing more in federalist terms than in a tight centrally directed polity. In this sense the British action represents an important declaration of principle, though given the 11-1 vote against them it is highly doubtful whether they will prevail in the long term. However, Mr Major's action might well have beneficial if unintended effects for Australia's trading position; Germany's first choice if they can't have Dehaene is Ireland's Peter Sutherland whose outstanding leadership in the GATT trade talks last year rescued success from the jaws of failure. Sutherland is a dedicated free trader with a reputation for persuading the most intransigent pro- tectionists of the value of give and take. And even French hardliners were impressed with his strength of purpose when the Americans almost wrecked the GATT talks with their last-minute demands from the Hollywood lobby. He would bring a new and refreshing approach to one of the world's most influential tasks.
  24. 1994-11-27 Article 130540418, score 11.111429 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People FREDERICK FRITH,   AUGUSTIN EDOUART,   JOHN FIELD,   SUZANNE HAYWARD YOUNG,   JOHN DEMPSEY,   DION SKINNER LOGOS,   DION SKINNER,   ISABELLA BEETHAM,   H. W. FIELD,   JOHN MIERS,   KEN ARNOLD
    Organisations SINGER SEWING MACHINES,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   CHRISTIES SOUTH KEN
    Locations FREDDO,   AUSTRALIA,   WINSTON CHUR
    Misc FRENCHMAN,   BUSHMAN [ TABLE SALT,   BILLY TEA,   BRITISH,   AUSTRALIAN
    COLLECTABLES Dion Skinner Logos of old still capture the mind IN THE world of advertising, nothing, is more effective than a simple, identifiable logo based firmly on the KISS (keep it simple stupid) principal. Even with today's advanced technologies, highly edu cated creative writers and more gadgets and gizmos that you can poke a stick at, it appears our fore fathers were masters of th6 simple, catchy and effective slogan. None more so than MacRobert son's Freddo the Frog. Created more than 60 years ago, Freddo cap tured our imaginations then, and continues to do so in the '90s. With his mischievous eyes, open mouth and watermelon smile, Freddo was an instant hit and remains one of the most successful and best-known advertising confectionery logos in Australia today. As an example of the popularity and appeal of Freddo to collectors and hobbyists, ceramic models of him issued, in lolly shops in the '30s are now raising in excess of a thou- . sand dollars at auction. Freddo is just one item on a seemingly endless list of early Aus- ' tralian advertising paraphernalia . which has suddenly hit the spot with collectors. As more and more of us search . through sheds, attics arid boxes for old tin and enamel signs from yes teryear, the values of these items , increase almost daily. Such is the demand for old adver tising signs, a wide range of repli cas is now being produced and sell for about 25 per cent of the value of ! the authentic product. They are faithful reproductions, right down to the rust and damaged paint work. In fact some are so good, they can easily be mistaken for the ' genuine article. Prospective buyers need to be aware of this. If you're looking to buy a origin al metal sign, examine it carefully and obtain a receipt stating specific- , ally what it is and that it's not a re production. But there is a big demand for the , reproductions. The Australian Ad vertising Signs Valuation Guide by 1 Ken Arnold is recommended if you're looking to purchase. The , sort of money you'll pay for a Billy Tea reproduction, 580mmx360mm starts at about 75, The Bushman [ Table Salt sells for around 40; Singer Sewing Machines from 50 ; and Liquid Sunshine from 30. Because antique doll collecting has now become so popular world-wide with prices to match, here are some helpful hints for an tique doll care. Sadly, so many antique dolls I see have been irreparably damaged by well-meaning but amateur restorers who damage the doll to the point where not even expert restorative work can salvage a botched job. Do not restring a ball jointed bisque (unglazed porcelain) head doll unless you know what to do. Do not repair, repaint or change the original nature of the doll un less it is essential to its preserva tion; Minor repairs should be left if the structure of the doll is not threatened and major repairs undertaken only if essential. Repairing or replacing missing fingers should be left to a skilled restorer. Don't attempt such spe cialised work yourself as a bad re pair job is worse than a missing finger. Do not add eyelashes and do not repaint the body or limbs un less there has been a major repair which has to be colour-matched. Do not throw away any old wigs or clothing. Keep them with the doll. Do not store a sleep doll on its back. The glass eyes are fragile and could fall back inside the head and break. Old eyes are almost impossi ble to replace and modern glass eyes do not look the same. Always store a sleep eye doll face down with the head well protected. Before photography and up until around 1840, there were silhouettes created by profilists, a practice which lasted for about 200 years. Now, well over a century later, there's renewed interest in an art form which was created from a va riety of different materials ranging from paper cut-outs to elaborate profiles painted on glass and plas ter. Frenchman Augustin Edouart who retired in 1849 and Englishmen John Field, H. W. Field, Frederick Frith, John Dempsey and John Miers were renowned and profes sional profilists. One of the best British lady exponents of the 20th century was Mrs Isabella Beetham. At a recent Christies South Ken sington auction, silhouettes realised 75,000 for 79 lots. Two painted plaster examples created by John Miers sold for 8400 and 4000 re spectively. A skilfully cut and hand torn silhouette of Winston Chur chill in full flow at the House of Commons during a debate in the mid 1950s, by Suzanne Hayward Young, sold for 360. Dion Skinner can be contacted on (08) 332 5005.
  25. 1994-10-21 Article 118292845, score 11.103062 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NIGEL STAPLEDON,   PAUL KEATING,   BERNIE FRA,   IAN HENDERSON
    Organisations BANK,   BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA,   RESERVE BANK,   WESTPAC,   PARLIAMENT,   WESTPAC MELBOURNE INSTITUTE
    Locations ASIA-PACIFIC
    PM backs rate rise as recovery tool By, IAN HENDERSON Prime Minister Paul Keating has endorsed using interest rates to smooth the recovery in the econo my and said that recovery would automatically help reduce the budget deficit. - Mr Keating told Parliament yesterday that comments by Re serve Bank governor Bernie Fra ser supporting higher interest rates to sustain the recovery, to smooth the recovery ..! is not a message that burdens the Gov ernment because the Government used monetary policy in the last [economic] cycle .which I thought would demonstrate. that we know it is available' as an instrument . Mr Keating said, if.growth is greater [than forecast], the deficit ' reduction will automatically be' faster than the Government had projected. The economy's strength was highlighted by both the Business Council of Australia and the Re serve' Bank. But the council's .retiring pre sident, John. Ralph, warned against complacency and called for further action on the Budget and on microeconomic reform. In the council's annual report, Mr Ralph said our economic fundamentals are ai their best for many years . However, he said we are' still facing some major problems, notably massive exter nal debt, continuing balance of payments deficits and-large Bud get deficits. We must not jeopar dise our potential for high and sustained growth by becoming complacent. Unless we accelerate the pro cess of microeconomic and bud getary reform, we will not be in a position to capture the full range of opportunities that are available to us in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond, he said. The Reserve Bank's October bulletin reported the available indicators suggest that the econo my continued to grow strongly during the September quarter. This trend is expected to contin ue over the year ahead . Until the national accounts are published late next month, as sessments of the September quar ter rely on a range of partial in dicators. The bank says partial data sug gest that spending by households and businesses rose, strongly on increased confidence and in-', comes. It said the current high level of consumer confidence should see employment growth and rising real wages translate into further increases in spend ing by.households over the next several quarters , and was opti mistic about the outlook for fur ther falls in unemployment and for prospects for the investment growth necessary to raise the economy's production potential . The bank's optimism was rein forced yesterday by the Westpac Melbourne Institute leading index of economic activity, which rose by 2.4.per cent in August, more that offsetting the July fall. Westpac's acting chief economist, Nigel Stapledon, said the leading index in conjunction with other indicators, highlights the strength of economic activity and increases the probability that the Reserve Bank will move very soon to lift short-term interest rates .
  26. 1994-06-09 Article 118169826, score 11.049263 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALLEN SINAI,   ROSEANNE CAHN,   LARRY SUMMERS,   JOHN DURIE,   STEVE ROACH,   ROSEANNC CAHN
    Organisations FIRST BOSTON,   LEHMAN BROTHERS,   FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD,   MORGAN STANLEY,   FIRST BOS
    Locations AMERI,   NEW YORK,   UNITED STATES,   JAPAN
    Misc AMERICANS,   AMERICAN,   JAPANESE
    US economy like banker's dream THE United States economy is showing signs of turning into a central banker's dream, steady growth at around 3 per cent a year with little if any inflation to worry about. Over the past month the eco nomic statistics have shown a clear slowdown in last year's boom sec tors: cars, personal consumption and housing. The key reason for the slowdown is this year's interest rate hikes which have seen short-term rates increase by 1.25 per cent to 4.25 per cent and 30-year mortgage rates by nearly 2 per cent from last October's lows of 8.36 per cent. Text books say interest rate in creases aren't supposed to hit the economy for at least nine months, but the fact that car and home sales are now peaking just four months after the Federal Reserve Board began lifting rates under lines why the moves were neces sary. V Interest rates were too low last year and consumers rushed into new homes and bought cars, taking advantage of the cheap money and helping to push overall economic growth to a 7 per cent annual growth rate in the last quarter of last year. This momentum continued in the first quarter, in which the economy grew by 3 per cent and thanks to delays from the unusually cold weather will be seen in around 3.8 per cent annualised growth this quarter. First Boston economist Roseannc Cahn expects the economy to slow from a 3.5 per cent rate this year to 2.5 per cent next year. This, she says, is when the inter est-rate hikes will really kick in. The good news, according to Morgan Stanley economist Steve Roach, is we [the US] could grow at 2.5 to 3 per cent for two or three years or longer without a major glitch. According to Deputy Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, For the first time in 30 years we have an investment-led recovery from a non-inflationary base. This fact explains the long-term confidence and, barring the ever possible policy mistakes, the recov ery, now into its fourth year, could outlast the last period of growth which stretched nearly eight years to July 1990. OVER the past three years productivity has increased by an average 2.5 per cent a year, while the economy has grown by 2.8 per cent, so productivity gains have provided 80 per cent of growth. This is great news for non-in flationary growth but not terrific news for job seekers, Roach said. The Morgan Stanley economist expects the productivity boom to continue, predicting a 17 per cent increase in capital-equipment spending this year and 12 per cent next year after last year's 16 per cent gain. JOHN DURIE in New York says statistics have shown a clear slowdown in last year's boom sectors. By contrast spending on new plant has been meagre, growing by 0.6 per cent last year, a predicted 0.5 per cent this year and 3.7 per cent next year. Business is spending money on job-saving equipment while Ameri can capital stock is ageing with an average age now of 8.5 years, the oldest since 1965. American companies are spend ing on new equipment but relative ly little on new factories, but the bulls hope this may change. The Federal Reserve Board's rate hikes weren't the only factor to slow car and house spending. Thanks to rises in personal in come tax for the rich, Americans paid an extra SUS35 billion in tax in April when payments are due. In May 1.4 million cars were sold, up 3 per cent from the levels of a year ago. . But Wall Street expects new car sales to fall from 15.5 million vehi cles last year to 15 million next year. New home construction has peaked at a rate of 1.5 million a year and is expected to fall to a 1.3 million rate next year. These figures suggest a slow down but not an economic collapse and in the words of Lehman Brothers' economist Allen Sinai the economy is moderating nicely and a long way short of collaps ing . The May unemployment report showed a big drop in the unem ployment rate from 6.4 to 6 per cent. But some of this was due to statistical glitches and more atten tion was paid to the 120,000 gain in jobs in the month. This was well down from the average job gains posted in the previous four months of 247,000 and further evidence of this slow down. OVER the past 12 months American consumers have in creased spending by 4 per cent while their income has grown by 2.6 per cent and this gap is shown by the historically low savings rate of just 3.7 per cent. The mortgage rate increases have added around SI50 a month to the payments on a S100,000 mortgage, further squeezing cash available for spending and adding another reason why the economy will slow. The expected relative weakness in consumer spending gives further reason to be confident about low inflation, according to First Bos ton's Roseanne Cahn. If housing has peaked now the economy capacity will be free for the expected improvement in the major world economies early next year, she said. Long-term bond yields have fall en from a high of 7.6 per cent to 7.2 per cent in recent weeks, but the bond market is yet to show full confidence in what appears to be a dream economy. When it does, bond yields should fall below 7 per cent, taking mort gage rates down with it. The dollar still confounds, with economic fundamentals and inter est-rate differentials suggesting a rate of 115 yen to the dollar, well above the 105 yen rate at which the greenback now trades. One reason for the weakness is continued fear that the Clinton Ad ministration will be too aggressive in fighting Japan on trade issues and use the dollar to engineer its aim of cutting Japanese imports. Steve Roach argues that the Ad ministration's bias towards man aged trade is one of the key policy problems which could upset the economy's dream run. If the Federal Reserve Board errs on the side of too much cau tion, it could also slow the economy too quickly, but so far it is managing its affairs close to perfection. The coming debate on health re form could also see tax increases which hit the economy and accord ing to Roach represent another danger. But with the year now half over, the US economy is running like a financial market dream.
  27. 1994-06-19 Article 118172384, score 11.008598 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BRAD HUGHES,   DAVID EDWARDS,   WAYNE GRADY,   JACK NICKLAUS,   KIWI FRANK NOBILO,   GREG NORMAN,   JOSE MARIA OLAZABAL,   JOHN COOK,   NICK FALDO,   HALE IRWIN,   CRAIG PARRY,   PAYNE STEWART,   SCOT MONTGOMERIE,   ARNOLD PALMER,   COLIN MONT GOMERIE,   LONG JOHN DALY,   LEE JANZEN,   IAN BAKER-FINCH
    Organisations OAKMONT
    Locations PENNSYLVANIA,   UNITED STATES,   PITTSBURGH
    Misc AMERICANS,   AUSTRALIANS,   MASTERS,   US OPEN,   AUSTRALIAN MASTERS,   AUSTRALIAN
    Norman struggles, six shots off pace PITTSBURGH, Pennsylvania: A disappointed Greg Norman struggled on the greens to fall six strokes behind leader Colin Mont gomerie in the almost-completed second round at the US Open here on Friday. Norman failed to take full advan tage of relatively benign conditions as he compiled three birdies and three bogies for an even-par 71 on. the Oakmont course softened by overnight rain. He posted an even-par 142 half way total to head the Australian challenge, one shot better than compatriot Brad Hughes, who bog ied the final hole for 72. Fellow Australian Craig Parry bounced back after a poor opening round to card a commendable three-under 68, but was still a dis tant 10 shots back. Burly Scot Montgomerie carded a brilliant 65 to set the pace at six under 136. He was two shots in front of Americans John Cook (65), David Edwards (65) and Hale Irwin (69) when play was halted for the day due to lightning, with 18 play ers still on the course. They were scheduled to complete the second round early yesterday, but none was within striking dis tance of the lead. The great Jack Nicklaus (70) was only three strokes behind, and Kiwi Frank Nobilo was four back after a 71 which included a double bogey at the par-five fourth hole. I am delighted to be where I am, said Nobilo, playing his first US Open. If I keep playing as close as pos sible to my own ability, then I have a chance. A major championship brings together the best players in the world and you can't beat them by default. Norman, meanwhile, was disap pointed to slip back after a promis ing 71 in much tougher conditions in Thursday's first round. I didn't putt as well as I'd like to have, he said. I didn't feel I had the speed of the greens. I had an opportunity to put a pretty good score on the board, but I just didn't do it. Hughes, making his US Open de but, was fairly satisfied, despite his final-hole bogey. If someone had said [before the start] that I was going to be one over after two rounds, I would have tak en it, said last year's Australian Masters champion. I lost my concentration a bit towards the end. You don't have to be too far off to make a bogey around here. Now I've made the cut my aim is to finish in the top 16 and get into the Masters and US Open next year. Montgomerie reeled off five bird ies, an eagle and just one bogey to vault to the lead. It's nice to be in contention at this early stage, said Montgomerie, 30, who sank a 2.5m putt to birdie the last Two ahead is a little cushion but anything can happen and probably will. I played better tee-to-green to day. Conditions were slightly easi er. The greens were softer. That's as good as I can do, I think, one bogey, five birdies and an eagle. I am very happy with the way I am playing. My goal at the start of the year was to get into contention in major . championships. I missed the cut at the Masters by a shot, but that course doesn't suit me. The US Open suits my game by the way I hit most fairways. Australians Wayne Grady and Ian Baker-Finch were among those certain to miss the cut Grady had 74 for seven-over 149, and Baker-Finch carded 74 for 15 over 157. Among the notables also with a free weekend were defending cham pion Lee Janzen, five-time major winner Nick Faldo, former champi on Payne Stewart, Masters champi on Jose Maria Olazabal, crowd favourite Long John Daly and the legendary Arnold Palmer. Palmer had an emotional fare well in his final US Open. The 64 year-old superstar was in tears as he received a huge ovation from his army at the 18th hole. Hometown hero Palmer, who grew up in Pittsburgh, broke down as he tried to talk about it. I got a little tired and a little emotional coming up 18, he sobbed, wiping tears form his eyes with a white towel. I have won a few tournaments [but] I haven't won all that much. I think I am a bit sun whipped and tired, ready to take a little rest. Hopefully there'll be a few more tournaments along the way. AAP
  28. 1994-02-13 Article 134301490, score 10.998573 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DANNY FRAWLEY,   STEWART LOEWE,   NICKY WINMAR,   DARREN JARMAN,   JOHN PLATTEN,   DARREN BAXTER,   SHANE CRAWFORD,   PETER KNIGHTS,   ROBERT HARVEY,   JASON TAYLOR,   ALAN JOYCE,   RAY JENCKE,   PAUL HUDSON,   PAUL DEAR,   SHARPSHOOTER JASON DUNSTALL,   TONY LOCKETT,   STAN ALVES,   RUSSELL MORRIS
    Organisations HAWKS,   AFL
    Locations MELBOURNE,   HAWTHORN,   ST KILDA,   BRISBANE
    Saints fall victim to resurgent Hawks MELBOURNE: Pundits proclaiming an end to Hawthorn's days as a genuine premiership contender may have to rethink after the AFL club blitzed St Kilda by 47 points in a practice match yesterday. Under new coach Peter Knights, the Hawks scored an easy 16.7 (103) to 8.8 (56) victory. Despite making the finals for the past 12 seasons, Hawthorn is supposedly a club on the way down but there was little sign of it yesterday. Those seemingly endless chains of handballs and players running in groups, trademarks of Hawthorn's game, were on display again. The Hawks and Saints were tied at 6.4 (40) at half-time before Knights' team increased the pressure and bagged 10 goals to just two in the final two periods. Knights, who took over from Alan Joyce at the end of 1993, was not getting carried away but was clearly pleased with the victory. It was really our first hit-out against another club but we went well and it was a good chance for me and my new match committee to have a look at all of our players, he said. Knights seems destined for greater success in his second term as an AFL coach after chalking up few victories as the inaugural Brisbane Bears' mentor from 1987 to 1989. Sharpshooter Jason Dunstall dominated in attack with six goals for the Hawks, backed up by three goals from utility Darren Baxter. Jason Taylor and Ray Jencke were most impressive at half-back with the latter cutting star Saint Nicky Winmar out of the game. An injury-free Paul Dear was dangerous at half-forward and rovers John Platten and Shane Crawford were also major contributors. The Hawks were close to full strength, missing only Darren Jarman and Paul Hudson who are not quite ready to play. In contrast, the Saints were missing top players such as Tony Lockett, Stewart Loewe, Danny Frawley, Robert Harvey and Russell Morris, but coach Stan Alves was taking little comfort from that fact. Alves said, Hawthorn beat us in areas of commitment, they punished us. We were missing some players but our second string players have got to become better. He said his team had learnt a lot from the game and he had a clearer picture of his team's early-season progress.
  29. 1994-11-19 Article 130538639, score 10.934995 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JON PETERSON,   PETER MACDONALD,   KEN NIELSEN,   TERRY GRIF FITHS,   NEIL LISTER,   JOHN O'NEILL,   DOUG SHEARS,   CLOVER MOORE,   JOHN STUDDY,   TONY HARRIS,   BARRY WEIR,   PETER COLLINS,   JOHN HATTON,   KEVIN ROZZOLI,   DON HUGHES
    Organisations AGRIFOODS LTD,   STATE BANK OF NSW,   MARS INC,   LABOR OPPOSITION,   STATE SU PERANNUATION AUTHORITY BOARD,   NSW PARLIAMENT,   STATE BANK,   HOUSE,   GOODMAN FIELDER,   BANKERS TRUST,   UNILEVER AUSTRALASIA,   GOODMAN FIELDER LTD
    Locations NEW SOUTH WALES,   SYDNEY
    Misc INDEPENDENTS,   COALI,   AUSTRALIAN
    , . , BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Sale of State Bank still not a sure thing SYDNEY: The sale of Austral lia's fifth-largest bank, the State Bank of NSW, is still not in the clear despite yesterday good profit result and a highly fav ourable report card from the state Auditor-General. The NSW Parliament has only one week to debate and pass the sale legislation or forfeit a 7 million penalty to Colonial Mu tual Life. Colonial agreed to buy the State Bank for 576.5 million and NSW Auditor-General Tony Harris said yesterday the terms for the sale and the sale process had been fair, reasonable and open . However,' he said that if the four major Australian-owned banks had been allowed to bid, the sale price would have been higher. His'report was issued barely hoiirs after the bank an nounced a pre-tax profit of 70 million (net profit of 40.1 mil lion) in the year to September 30 after a net loss of 74.6 mil lion last year. A dramatic drop in abnor mals and bad and doubtful debts have thrust the bank back into the black. Managing director John O'Neill said the bank's margins were lower than they should be but he expected them to grow as demand for business loans rose. Treasurer Peter Collins said Mr Harris had completely vindi cated the Government's position that it was selling its asset by the book . I am delighted with the con tents of the report. I was al ways confident that the sale process would be upheld, he said. But the Labor Opposition and at least one of the three non-aligned Independents, John Hatton, said yesterday they would still vote against the sale. Because Labor and the Coali tion each have 47 seats in the 99-seat lower House, after for mer Police Minister Terry Grif fiths's move to the cross benches, the Government needs the vote of both Clover Moore and Peter Macdonald to push the sale through. Otherwise, if the vote is tied at 49-all, Speaker Kevin Rozzoli will have to break convention and vote against the status quo of retaining the State Bank in public ownership. Dr Macdonald said he would not make his position public until Monday and Ms Moore could not be contacted yester day. . The bank reduced its charge for bad and doubtful debts to 90.9 million from 140.4 mil lion previously and suffered no abnormal losses, after charging 96 million for a change in the corporate tax rate and adverse legal judgments. Fierce competition in all lend ing sectors led to a decline in net interest income to 411.4 million from 437.7 million and a fall in interest margins to 2.2 per cent from 2.3 per cent. Voters express anger SYDNEY: Shareholders of Trans-Tasman food giant Goodman Fielder Ltd exr pressed their anger yesterday at the company's poor per formance by voting against appointment two directors at the annual general meeting. The election of Neil Lister, one of three directors nominated in a deal brokered between the board and dissatisfied institutional shareholders, was forced to a for mal poll and the re-election of in cumbent director Don Hughes was also opposed. This is an opportunity for shareholders to show disgust at the board's poor performance, one sharehold- ; er said. He and other share holders ex pressed dissat isfaction at the company's share price and its flag ging earnings, which dropped to 93.4 million in 1993-94 from 182 mil lion in the previous year. The criti cism prompt ed chairman John Studdy to concede that the share price, which this week hit a 9'/2-year low of 1.16, was appalling. A number of shareholders said the share price should be between 2 and 2.50, although Mr Studdy said this would only be achieved by posting satisfactory profits. Until we can produce an ac ceptable bottom line, our share price and the market perception of the company is unlikely to be fully restored, he said. Mr Studdy attributed: the fall to the instability caused by the con flict earlier this year between the board and dissident investors holding 16 per cent in the com pany, comprising The AMP Soci ety, Bankers Trust, the State Su perannuation Authority Board, and Doug Shears' Agrifoods Ltd. That conflict was resolved when Studdy agreed to step down when a suitable replacement could be found and three nomi nees, Agrifood's Mr Lister, for mer Unilever Australasia chair man Jon Peterson and former Mars Inc executive Ken Nielsen would be appointed to the board. However, shareholders opposed the appointment of Mr Lister, forcing the vote to a formal poll, the results of which will not be known until Monday. We have three directors placed upon our board at the be hest of 16 per cent of the share holding of this company and the behest of four shareholders out of 54,000, said one shareholder. Managing director Barry Weir conceded that the weak share price made the group vulnerable to take-over, al though Mr Studdy answer. Mr Studdy said another strate gic review was under way, which would be concluded by March. rejected recent media reports that the company had been approached with an offer. However, he said the board had studied many op tions, including the sale of its Eu ropean operations and splitting Goodman Fielder into two groups commodities and branded products. However, we have not yet been able to come up with a satisfactory John Studdy Under the review, each part of the business would be thoroughly examined and it would give the new directors a forum for input. Mr Studdy said he hoped to an nounce his replacement by the time the company reported its half-yearly results. We don't have any definite names at the moment, he said. Goodman Fielder shares closed one cent firmer at 1.18.
  30. 1994-11-24 Article 130539624, score 10.855936 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ADRIAN KLOEDEN,   JESSE HELMS,   TONY RUSSELL,   JOHN GOUGH,   BILL CLINTON,   ONG BENG SENG,   JOHN GOUGH MCCAUGHAN,   DON MERCER,   SAMANTHA GOLD,   ROBERT BYRD,   ROSS GARNAUT,   ROBERT DOLE,   BER NIE FRASER,   DON MER,   IAN HENDERSON
    Organisations BBA,   ESAN DA,   ANZ FUNDS MANAGEMENT,   BANK,   BTR NYLEX,   WOODSIDE PETROLEUM,   HPL,   FOREIGN RELA TIONS COMMITTEE,   CONGRESS,   NEWCREST MINING,   GOVT RESERVE BANK,   COMMONWEALTH,   NEWS CORP,   WESTPAC BANKING CORP LTD,   RESERVE,   BHP,   WESTPAC,   NATIONAL AUSTRA LIA BANK LTD,   NATIONAL AUS TRALIA BANK,   CHALLENGE BANK LTD,   NAB,   POSEIDON GOLD,   BRASH HOLDINGS LTD,   PLACER PACIFIC,   SENATE,   ANZ BANK ING GROUP LTD,   ANZ MCCAUGHAN,   BRASHS PTY LTD,   MORGAN STOCKBROKING,   BANK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA LTD,   DEMOCRATIC,   ANZ MELBOURNE,   ANZ,   HOMESTAKE GOLD,   ANZ BANKING GROUP LTD
    Locations WESTERN AUSTRALIA,   BRASHS,   MELBOURNE,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   WA,   PAKISTAN,   KARACHI,   SINGAPORE,   WASHINGTON,   NEW ZEALAND,   NORTH CAROLINA,   WALL STREET,   PACIFIC DUNLOP,   UNITED STATES
    Misc REPUBLICANS,   SOUTH ASIAN,   AUSTRA LIAN,   DOW JONES,   REPUBLICAN,   RE,   ARGENTINE,   GENERAL AGREEMENT ON TARIFFS,   EUROPEAN,   REPUBLI CANS,   REPUBLICAN-CON,   DEMOCRATS,   BRITISH,   AUSTRALIAN
    B U SIN E SSL AN D INVESTMENT Bargain hunters help market rally Shares recover after early dive SYDNEY: Australian share prices went on a wild rollercoaster ride yesterday, plunging more than 3 per cent in the morning session before recovering most of the losses as bargain hunters en tered the market in the after noon. A wave of panic selling sparked by a 92-point plunge on Wall Street overnight saw the local market dive more than 3 per cent to a low of 1814.5 in frantic morning trade. However, bargain hunting and an excellent profit result from the ANZ Banking Group Ltd set the market on a steady upward curve, with the all ordinaries in dex ending 20.6 points, or 1.1 per cent, lower at 1857.1. It was the market's sixth consecutive fall, taking total, market losses to nearly 8 billion in the past two days and to its lowest close since August 13 last year. The drubbing followed the sec ond-biggest one-day fall on Wall Street this year, with the Dow Jones average index closing 91.52 points lower at 3677.99. People got a little excited this morning, causing the market to start off much weaker, but I think certainly the fact that it was hammered so badly yesterday helped it recover as it was prob ably a little overdone, Tony Russell, of Morgan Stockbroking, said. The ANZ result gave the market some confidence, one broker said. We saw a lot of retail in vestors coming in at these levels to buy. ANZ shares jumped 8c, or 2.2 per cent, to 3.75, National Aus tralia Bank rose 14c to 10.54, Westpac added 7c to 4.12 and Commonwealth lifted 8c to 7.26. Market leader BHP closed 28c down at 18.26 off a low of 17.78 and News Corp fell 11c to 5.10. Elsewhere among the bluechips, BTR Nylex fell 5c to 2.25 while Pacific Dunlop and Woodside Petroleum each tumbled 10c to 3.50 and 4.45 respectively. National turnover totalled 243.5 million shares worth 639.7 mil lion. Declining Issues outnum bered advancers on a ratio of al most four to one. The gold marker closed 73.3 points, or 3.6 per cent, softer at a 13-month low of 1940.0. Placer Pacific lost 13c to 3.32, Homestake Gold dived 10c to 1.50, Poseidon Gold slipped 7c to 2.96 and Newcrest Mining lost 13c to 5.85. Samantha Gold slumped 36c, or 9.2 per cent, to 3.54 on light turnover of 180,400 shares. Pacific BBA shares nose-dived 65c, or almost 20 per cent, to a 14-month low of 2.70. The company said yesterday that it planned to hold talks with the investment community outlining the company's strategy after ir regularity in its accounts re vealed on Tuesday. Huge profit for ANZ MELBOURNE: ANZ Bank ing Group Ltd claimed: yes terday that it was the second-best bank in Australia with the announcement of a surprisingly big annual net profit of 821.9 million. The post-abnormals-result was more than triple the previous year's 246.5 million and was well ahead of market expectations, which ranged from 610 million to 764 million before abnormals. The final dividend was in creased 4c to an unfranked 14c a share, and the bank said it was hopeful of resuming partial frank ing in 1996. I do believe that in the market we were portrayed 'as very much the third bank [behind Westpac Banking Corp Ltd], ANZ chair man John Gough told reporters after the profit announcement. In actual fact, we are the sec ond bank and we are the second bank in every area. ANZ chief executive Don Mer cer predicted that ANZ could soon overtake the country's top rating bank, the National Austra lia Bank Ltd, in terms of returns on shareholders' funds. Analysts were won over, saying that while ANZ still had work to do, it had clearly usurped Westpac as the best recovery bank. All in all, it's demonstrating a fair bit of strength and the mar ket can be expected to re-rate the bank upwards on the basis of this result, one Melbourne analyst said. The re-rating was already un der way by the day's end, with the result good enough to pull ANZ shares up 8c to 3.75 on a day when the overall market fin ished 1.1 per cent weaker at a 15 month closing low. The profit improvement was driven by a 252.3 million fall in the bank's bad and doubtful debts charge to 381.4 million and ma jor profit advances by the Austra lian and international businesses. It had a net abnormal gain of 18.7 million. The ANZ's Australian profits leapt to 456.8 million after tax and before abnormals from 199.9 million in 1992-93, aided by in creased net interest income and Bank 'now Australia's second best' as result outstrips expectations the containment of the rise in ex penses to 1.0 per cent. ANZ's finance company, Esan da, lifted earnings by 83.7 mil lion to 142.7 million, while ANZ Funds Management doubled its profit to 45.8 million from 20.4 million, and brokers ANZ McCaughan chimed. in with 14.4 million, up from 5.3 million. Receipt of some 41.3 million of interest arrears on rescheduled Argentine debt enhanced interna tional earnings, which grew 53 per cent to 250.7 million. ANZ said the British, European and South Asian regional busi nesses were particularly notable for their improved performances. Profit from New Zealand was flat at 95.7 million, against 95.9 million. Overall, ANZ said its market shares in key retail markets in both Australia and NZ were in creasing on the back of encourag ing lending growth, and interest yields were being maintained, de spite the industry competition. Further progress was made on the cost front, with its costs-to-in come ratio falling to 66 per cent from 69 per cent, and ANZ chief executive Don Mercer said fur ther costs improvement would be relentlessly pursued . Mr Mercer said the bank had no plans for a major acquisition or for the sale of its ANZ John Gough McCaughan, as has been ru moured. ANZ is very content with the business it has, he said. We have no major plans for acquisition, we have no plans for major divestment and frankly ... we have learned to love our bro ker, it fits in . quite well. McCaughans is part of the fami ly. The bank disclosed also that while it could not match NAB's Australian record annual profit of 1.7 billion, it was confident of outstripping NAB at least on one front return on shareholders' equity. ANZ's return before abnormals rose to 15.2 per cent over the year from 9.4 per cent, against NAB's 17.5 per cent. I fancy our chances of passing our friendly rival in return on shareholders funds, Mr Mercer said. Our rightful place is No 1 and ... we're within a sniff of it now. He would not be drawn on like ly future movements in interest rates, but said: I think the drift is upwards ... and a rising inter est regime makes life more diffi cult for banks. Rescue of Brashs pays off SYDNEY: Music retailer Brashs Pty Ltd said yesterday that its 20 million marketing push to establish itself as a home entertainment expert was paying off, with sales up more than 30 per cent on several months ago. Managing director Adrian Kloeden said the marketing drive had made a significant contribution to the company's bottom line, though he declined to reveal figures. Sales in October exceeded targets and are exceeding tar gets at the moment, Mr Kloe den said. The news signals the begin ning of a new era for the com pany, which has been plagued by difficulties in what Mr Kloe den described as a colourful year . In May, Brash Holdings Ltd shares were suspended after banks cancelled a loan facility, forcing the company to place it self in voluntary receivership. It emerged from voluntary ad ministration a month later, af ter accepting a 40 million res cue package from HPL/Reef, through Singapore developer Ong Beng Seng, which gained 100 per cent control of Brashs' assets. We're coming back strongly in 1995, which is shaping up to be an absolutely extraordinary year, Mr Kloeden said. In August, Brashs announced it would spend more than 20 million on marketing in the next year, while refurbishing its 150 stores as home enter tainment centres. That [marketing] program heralded a change in our adver tising and positioning as home entertainment experts, Mr Kloeden said. We're now focused on our core activities and the bottom line of the company has been enhanced because of that. Brashs also announced yester day its sponsorship of next year's Rolling Stones tour, a in vestment likely to prove very lucrative for the company. It's an absolute marketing coup, Mr Kloeden said. BankWest ready for full float as profits double PERTH: The Bank of Western Australia Ltd said yesterday it was ready for a full public float in 1995 after more than doubling its annual net profit to 82.7 million. We can say confidently that the bank can be floated without risk of major failure, its chairman, Dr Ross Garnaut, said. He cautioned al so that a merger with Challenge Bank Ltd would be a . major risk for the WA Government. BankWest's result for the year to September 30, which compared with 37.3 million a year ago, was struck on a 15.8 per cent rise in net inter est income to 312.4 million, which was mainly achieved on the back of WA's strong housing market. The bank's volume of housing loan approvals rose to a record 1.7 billion during 1993-94, confirming its position as the major housing lender in the WA market. Loan .quality also improved, with the proportion of problem loans fall ing to 1.7 per cent of its loan portfo lio and the charge to fund provision for doubtful debts falling 37.3 per cent to 19.3 million. As you can see in these results, BankWest has come a long way. But it's not the end of the road. There's improved performance ahead, Dr Garnaut said. I can say that I will be disap pointed if next year's bottom line is not larger than this year's. But the hardest work I think can be fairly said to have been done. We can say that the State of Western Australia would get a good return from a float, a ver.' good return. BankWest said the result reflected the substantial restructuring of its balance sheet and improvements to its operating structure. Clinton refuses to link trade vote to tax reduction WASHINGTON: US President Bill Clinton has rejected at tempts by incoming Senate ma jority leader Robert Dole to link passage of a world trade agree ment to a reduction of the capi tal-gains tax, sought by Republi cans. I disagree that there should be some kind of deal cut, he said on Monday. However, he said he was pleased with the progress he had made in talks with Senator Dole, whose support is vital if the agreement among 123 gov ernments is to be approved. Mr Clinton reiterated his pledge to work with Republi cans after the November 8 elec tions, which tossed dozens of Democrats out of office and gave the Republicans control of Congress. There are a lot of areas we can work together with Republi cans. We can finish the battle this administration began with the last Congress, he said. He admonished Senator Jesse Helms, expected to become chairman of the Foreign Rela tions Committee, for saying the President was so unpopular on military bases that he better have a bodyguard if he visits North Carolina. I think the remarks were un wise and inappropriate, the President said. Mr Clinton hinted that Sena tor Helms might not be the best senator to chair the Senate For eign Relations Committee. The President oversees the foreign policy of the United States and the Republicans will decide in whom they will repose their trust and confidence, he said. The Senate's most senior Dem ocrat joined Republican conser vatives on Tuesday in urging postponement of the vote. Sena tor Robert Byrd said the pact, negotiated under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, should be taken up next year in the Republican-con trolled Congress rather than during next week's session of the Democratic-controlled Con gress. Vice-President A1 Gore has said that postponement un til next year would be the same as killing the agreement. Fraser defends Reserve's links with Govt Reserve Bank governor Ber nie Fraser has rejected the view that increased indepen dence of the bank from the Government would lead to lower inflation and has sup ported the bank's current charter, which requires it to take into account economic growth and employment goals as well as lower inflation. Addressing central bankers in Karachi, in Pakistan, yes-' terday, Mr Fraser said that increased central bank inde pendence did not necessarily lead to lower inflation. Mone tary policies alone could not deliver this result without unacceptable costs in terms of lost output and jobs . In addi tion, fiscal and wages policies were important in delivering lower inflation. Mr Fraser said the Re serve's charter, which re quired it to give high priority to price stability but having regard to economic growth and employment, was one which he was comfortable with . The flexibility of the anti-inflation commitment suited the complexity and uncertainty of the real world better than simple, single goals . Mr Fraser said the is sue of central bank indepen dence was as old as central banking itself. - ian Henderson
  31. 1994-04-07 Article 118111668, score 10.819645 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN SHALI KASHVILI,   MU HAMED SACIRBEY,   RA DOVAN KARADZIC,   ROB AN NINK,   ALIJA IZETBE GOVIC
    Organisations INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS BOSNIAN RADIO,   UN SECURITY COUNCIL,   VICTORIA CROSS,   SECURITY COUNCIL,   AP PICTURE RUHR EXPRESS,   UNITED NATIONS,   NATO,   UN PRO TECTION FORCE
    Locations AMERICA,   LONDON,   ZENICA,   GORAZDE,   NEW YORK,   GENEVA,   BOSNIA,   SARAJEVO,   UNITED STATES,   GERMANY,   GRADINA,   DRINA VAL LEY
    Misc SERBS,   BOSNIAN SERB,   SERB,   BOSNIAN MUSLIM,   BOSNI,   RESOLUTION,   BOSNIAN,   YUGOSLAV,   UN-PROTECTED,   MUSLIM,   MUSLIM-LED BOSNI,   WORLD WAR II,   SFRB-RUN
    INTERNATIONAL Villagers flee enclave, rebel onslaught Serbs move on UN safe haven SARAJEVO: Rebel Serb forces are reported by United Nations officials to have ad vanced into a Bosnian Muslim enclave despite its status as a UN safe haven and villagers have fled to the safety of its main town. UN officials said on Tuesday the Serbs had advanced up to 10km into Gorazde in a week long onslaught, killing 52 people and wounding 250. Bosnian Ra dio said 73 people had been killed and more than 300 injured. The United States said the fall of the enclave in eastern Bosnia would be a setback for the peace process in the former Yugoslav republic, where civil war had raged for two years. But in the face of calls from the Bosnian Government for in ternational action to stop the as sault, America's top general ruled out using the threat of NATO air strikes to break the siege, as hap pened in Sarajevo. Right now, it is our judgment that conditions in Gorazde do not lend themselves to the use of air power, General John Shali kashvili, chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, told a news confer ence. He added, however, that the situation could change, and if the conditions are right, we will use air power to mitigate the be haviour of the Serbs . Prisoners drafted ZENICA, Bosnia: International relief workers say Muslim prison ers tortured in Sfrb-run detention camps have been drafted against their will by the Muslim-led Bosni an Government, reneging on a promise to send them abroad. One relief worker said on Tues day that drafting the former pris oners, who were suffering from se vere psychological effects from their detention, violated Geneva conventions. They don't have enough energy to fight for a piece of bread, let alone for Bosnia or patriotism or anything, the relief worker said. After pictures of emaciated pris oners had been shown on world television, Bosnian Serb leader Ra dovan Karadzic agreed to release all the prisoners under the auspic es of the International Committee of the Red Cross Bosnian radio reported that the Bosnian President, Alija Izetbe govic, had sent a letter to the UN Security Council to remind them of Resolution 824, which declared Gorazde a UN-protected area a year ago. Urging the council to act to halt the attacks, he wrote: The Serbs are burning everything and there are a huge number of civil ian casualties which we don't know of yet. At the United Nations in New York, Bosnia's Ambassador Mu hamed Sacirbey charged that the Security Council was receiving slow and inaccurate information about Gorazde and had not been fully alerted to the seriousness of the situation. Although the UN declared the enclave with its 65,000 inhabitants a safe haven a year ago, the organisation is only now getting around to sending peacekeeping troops there. Some 1000 peace keepers are due to go in later this month. A spokesman for the UN Pro tection Force said the Serbs had advanced to within 5km of Gor azde town. However, they were now running into a well-defended highland stronghold of the Bosni an army, called the Gradina, which would be much more diffi cult for them to seize. The Serbs need this high ground to advance into Gorazde town but it is our assessment that it is unlikely to fall as it's very well defended, Major Rob An nink said. A UN refugee agency spokes man said up to 2000 civilians had fled 13 villages in the Drina Val ley south of Gorazde. Rtuter AP Picture Ruhr Express , a long-stuffed racing pigeon which, dropped into Germany in World War II, flew 500km back with vital information and was awarded the animals' Victoria Cross the Dickin Medal. To be auctioned, with medal, in London, it could bring A25,000.
  32. 1994-04-19 Article 118114204, score 10.816973 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ERNST SAMEC,   ALLAN PRENTICE,   JOHN MCGILVRAY,   ALAN BOND,   DAVID FAWCETT,   PETER BURNETT,   BARRY ALTY,   DON HUMPHREYS,   REG FINN,   NEVILLE GALE,   CHRISTOPHER SKASE,   PETER FLAVEL,   FAW CETT
    Organisations BOND CORPORATION,   FOODLAND ASSOCIATED LTD,   STOCK EXCHANGE,   FAL,   QINTEX,   PTY LTD,   INDEPENDENT HOLDINGS LTD
    Locations FOODLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   PERTH,   NEW ZEALAND
    Fawcett quits in rift over FAL plans PERTH: David Fawcett, the man viewed by many as the driving force behind Foodland Associated Ltd, has quit after 10 years at the head of the am bitious independent grocer. Mr Fawcett and the FAL board confirmed yesterday that he had relinquished the chief executive's job late on Friday when the board had refused to support his plans for its restructuring. Neither would detail the plans in dispute. ( Mr Fawcett said, after his imme diate departure was announced by FAL in a statement to the Austra lian Stock Exchange yesterday looming, I felt it was necessary for the board to be restructured, tKe board didn't share that view. I've gone. . The news prompted a 45c tum ble in the company's share price to S5.50, although the shares recov ered slightly to close at 5.60 on turnover of just over 650,000. Mr Fawcett said the fall indicat ed that the market did not like his resignation, but FAL chairman, Peter Burnett, said he believed that. the price drop was a short-term reaction . Feedback from institutions in Australia and New Zealand had been' largely positive. ! Many people saw Christopher Skase as being Qintex, or Alan Bond as being Bond Corporation. He [Mr Fawcett] was an instru mental part of FAL but, as with everything, the organisation is big ger than any one person. Mr Fawcett's resignation is the latest in a series of events which have rocked FAL's share price and seen its interim results fall into the red. Merger talks with Davids Hold David Fawcett ings Pty Ltd, Composite Buyers and Independent Holdings Ltd last year collapsed when Davids with drew, leaving FAL's plans for a major national grocery group in tatters. Then FAL announced the ap pointment of an administrator to its eastern states Venture chain, and this month reported a bottom line interim loss of 12.4 million. It blamed the result on a 4.9 million trading loss for Venture, extraordinary provisions of 31.2 million and abnormal losses of 7.5 million. Mr Fawcett said that Foodland had been an important part of his life, but added: Unfortunately with something as important as the structure of the board, if there is disagreement between the chief ex ecutive and other board members it is not in the interests of the company to continue. He said FAL changed dramati cally late last year and he believed that this needed to.be reflected in the board. Mr Burnett confirmed that the board had disagreed with Mr Faw cett over some board changes re commended in a five-year plan. The board had been open and warm to changing its composi tion, but not necessarily in all areas , he said. The five-year plan was still being examined. He was confident that there would be more positives than ne gatives resulting from Mr Faw cett's resignation. General manager Barry Alty has been appointed acting chief execut ive officer for six months, until a replacement for Mr Fawcett is found. The FAL board comprises Mr Burnett, deputy-chairman Peter Flavel and independent directors Neville Gale, Allan Prentice, Don Humphreys, John McGilvray, Ernst Samec and Reg Finn. Mr Burnett said Mr. Fawcett gave six months notice, but the board had decided to pay him out. There was no anger. It was an amicable parting. The board ac cepted his resignation with deep re gret, but it was a decision he made, Mr Burnett said. Mr Fawcett joined the then-un listed FAL as managing director in 1984. He had renewed his contract with FAL only in July last year, signing on for another eight years. Mr Fawcett said yesterday that he would take six months holiday, adding that he felt great . It is the first Monday morning I have been able to sleep in for 25 years, he said. I'm looking for ward to tomorrow.morning.
  33. 1994-09-15 Article 118137904, score 10.78859 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ROBERT WRIGHT,   DAVID JONES LTD,   JOHN SPALVINS,   DAVID JONES,   DA VID JONES,   RON BRIERLEY
    Organisations ADELAIDE STEAM SHIP CO LTD,   GPG,   PIONEER PROPERTY,   WOOL WORTHS LTD,   WOOLWORTHS,   TOOTH AND CO LTD,   ADSTEAM,   GUINNESS PEAT GROUP PIC
    Locations ADSTCAM,   SYDNEY
    Misc TOOTH
    Adsteam shares take a dive SYDNEY: Shares in the debt laden Adsteam group plunged yes terday after shareholders were warned on Tuesday they might not see any return on their investment. Adsteam and David Jones said on Tuesday there might he no re sidual value Tor shareholders even after the companies sell all the re maining assets, which include the David Jones department stores, a marine operation and the Pioneer Property group. The companies also said they were considering a trade sale of DJ's, which would mean that shareholders would miss out on the opportunity to earn entitlements in a share market float. Shares in The Adelaide Steam ship Co Ltd halved in value to close at 9c, while David Jones Ltd tumbled 16c to 24c and Tooth and Co Ltd stock lost 5c to 35c. David Jones finance director Robert Wright attributed the fall to the flagging of the possible trade sale of the department stores. People also have to form the view as to what the value of the entitlement (in a float is as well, he said. The DJ's department stores are expected to fetch up to S800 mil lion, and supermarket giant Wool worths Ltd indicated earlier this week that it might be interested in such a purchase. Shares in Tooth were less affect ed yesterday because its sharehold ers were told there was some chance of recouping their invest ment. The three companies on Tuesday all reported another set of losses after abnormal items, although ex traordinary gains from the sale of Woolworths took the bottom lines of Adstcam and David Jones into the black. Adsteam's bottom line earnings were boosted by a net extraordi nary gain of 417.23 million, large ly attributable to the disposal of Woolworths, resulting in a bottom line profit of S333.05 million, against a loss of 222.59 million previously. The sale of Woolworths also lifted David Jones results to a hot John Spalvins torn line profit or S351.47 million from a S154.36 million loss previ ously. Tooth suffered a net loss after abnormals of S9.72 million, reduccd from S34.24 million last year. The Adsfcam group is burdened by S2.3 billion in debts and said it needed to sell its operating busi nesses because they would not gen erate sufficient earnings to service its debt. Yesterday's share market falls will be of considerable interest to Sir Ron Brierley's Guinness Peat Group Pic, which has recently been a major buyer of both Tooth and Adstcam. GPG is currently Adsteam's largest shareholder with 7.56 per cent stake. During July GPG pur chased nearly five million Adstcam shares for between 15c and 18c. It also purchased 1.5 million Tooth shares in July at 39c to lift its stake to 11.39 per cent from 10,18 per cent previously. Sir' Ron has previously said GPG is seeking a participation role in the future rehabilitation of the Adsteam group and has indicated he was opposed to the float of Da vid Jones.
  34. 1994-11-19 Article 130538763, score 10.661232 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ELISABETH MAYWALD,   ELISA BETH MAYWALD,   MICHAEL GOW,   GEOFF MORRELL,   GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS,   PETER HANDKE,   DAVID WILLIAMSON,   MIKE DALY,   DAVID MAMET
    Organisations STC,   SECRET HOUSE,   SYDNEY THEATRE COMPANY,   ANGELS
    Locations AMERICA,   LONDON,   MELBOURNE,   TASMANIA,   QUEENSLAND,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   CHICAGO,   NEW YORK,   CANBERRA THEATRE CENTRE
    Misc GERMAN
    Power plays of men and women Oleanna, a piece about sexual harassment, is meant to get up people's noses, director Michael Gow tells MIKE DALY. THE CONTENTIOUS, highly topical issue of sexual harassment is rarely tackled successfully on stage or screen. The Queensland and Melbourne Theatre companies' production of David Williamson's Brilliant Lies last year raised the subject but diluted the argument with confusing agendas. Now Oleanna, a tough new play by Chicago-born David Mamet, pits a bombastic university professor, John (Geoff Morrell), and uptight student Carol (Elisa beth Maywald) squarely against each other. Faced with academic failure, Carol seeks solace but John's reassuring hand on her shoulder lands him in a sexual harassment case and his career in the balance. Mamet is the stage/screenwrit- er responsible for Sexual Perversity in Chicago, the expletive-riddled Glengarry Glen Ross and Speed-The-Plow, as well as the original scripts of hit films such as The Untouchables, The Verdict and devious House of Games. Oleanna had its premiere in Chicago early last year, was staged successfully in Australia a few months later by the Sydney Theatre Company, with Michael Gow directing, and has since been a hit in New York and London. The STC restaged it a couple of months ago and that production, now touring Tasmania, Victoria and the ACT, can be seen at the Canberra Theatre Centre on November 22-26. I've never really seen Mamet's play as being simply about sexual harassment or political correctness, says Gow, who directed a sellout tour of his own controver- sial Furious earlier this year. People love Oleanna because it's just a battle between a man and woman, like all those other great plays. And yet it is never what it appears to be about . . . There is another power struggle going on. Between reviving Furious and remounting Oleanna, Gow spent much of this year writing has latGeoff Morrell and Elisabeth Maywald in a scene from Oleanna. est play which recently opened at Sydney's Wharf Theatre: Sweet Phoebe. He describes it as a twohander about a young couple who babysit a friend's dog for a week . . . and when the dog disappears their lives fall apart . Michael Gow has been writing plays for more than a decade, although his career really took off with Away in 1986. He was associate director at the STC between 1991 and '93, where he ran New Stages the company's research and development section directing innovative productions including Phaedra, The Women of Troy, Titus Andronicus and Oleanna. He also directed major STC plays such as Angels in America, Parts I and II as well as the Griffin Theatre productions Child Dancing and The Secret House. After the hermetic Oleanna, his next assignment will be a major production for the Sydney Festival. Hour We Knew Nothing of Each Other, by German writer Peter Handke, is an epic play with a cast of about 40, whom Gow will direct for the Theatre for Young People in an enormous converted railway carriage repair shop. The lure of Oleanna is Mamet's skilled manipulation of his audience's allegiances, says Gow. One minute you can see this poor guy's just waded into something he knew nothing about, and this woman is out to bring him down. The next minute you realise she has an absolutely valid argument and he is an old fart playing with people's lives; she's trying to teach him he has power over students without even knowing it and is abusing that power. So Oleanna is neither sexist nor misogynist? It will, however, upset people with clear, dogmatic guidelines in their lives which I think is fantastic, he adds gleefully. It's absolutely designed to get up people's noses. This last trait, of course, fits Michael Gow's theatrical philosophy perfectly.
  35. 1994-02-09 Article 134300696, score 10.638891 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People COLES MYER,   JOHN BOWIE WILSON
    Organisations PASMINCO,   HAMERSLEY IRON PTY LTD,   NEWS CORP,   HAMBROS,   BHP,   DUNLOP,   WOOLWORTHS,   JAPANESE STEEL MILLS,   BRAMBLES INDUSTRIES,   CRA,   AMCOR LTD
    Locations TOKYO,   SYDNEY,   PACIFIC,   NEW YORK,   UNITED STATES
    Misc ROUGH LY RECOUPING,   NIK KEI,   DOW JONES,   ORDINARIES INDEX RECOUPED,   AUSTRALIAN
    US turnaround leads Australian market recovery SYDNEY: The Australian stock market clawed its way back over the 2300-point level yesterday, led by the recovery on Wall Street. The all ordinaries index recouped almost half Monday's 51.7-point loss, in response to Friday's inter est-rate led slump on Wall Street, by climbing 24.3 points to close just off its intraday high at 2305.4 points. In New York overnight the Dow Jones industrial average, which had fallen after a 25 basis point lift in US interest rates, bounced back to finish 34.90 points up at 3906.32. Yesterday's stronger Tokyo Nik kei, rising 236.83 points to 20,251;23, also boosted investors' sentiment. But brokers said the local market remained cautious, at least in the short term. John Bowie Wilson, of Hambros, said the fact futures did not rise as much as the all ords showed there was still a bit of suspicion out there , although there was good buying. On the Sydney' futures market, the March Share Price Index rose 19 points to 2313.0 on turnover of 9141 lots and was at a 7.6 point premium to the physical. Sentiment for the longer term re mained strong, brokers anticipating further good results during the re porting season. Offshore buyers, who have driv en the market in recent weeks, re turned to major stocks yesterday, with stocks across the board rough ly recouping half Monday's fall. Among the leaders, News Corp was to 10.38 on turnover of 3.72 million shares, after shedding 43c on Monday. BHP, which slipped 34c on Mon day, was 10c higher at 19.02 on similar turnover, and Amcor Ltd ended 26c higher to 10.96. Coles Myer was 18c up at 5.22 and rival Woolworths added 10c to 3.48 as the retail sector piled on' 87.6 points, or 3.13 per cent. Among other industrials, transporter Brambles Industries added 26c to 14.92 and Pacific. Dunlop, which lost 16c on Monday, jumped the same amount to 5.71. Diversified miner CRA firmed 38c to 19.26, analysts saying the agreement by CRA unit Hamersley Iron Pty Ltd and Japanese Steel Mills for a 7.6 per cent price cut for iron ore was around expectations. Base metals outfit Pasminco firmed 8c to 2.38, with 7.59 mil lion shares traded. In Tokyo, share prices rallied as the Government settled a thorny tax dispute that had been holding up fiscal stimulus measures. The US dollar edged lower. The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Aver age gained 236.83 points, or 1.18 per cent, closing at 20,251.23; the index had lost 287.03 points, or 1.41 per cent on Monday.
  36. 1994-05-07 Article 118209867, score 10.543583 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MICHEL JAZY,   CHRISTOPHER BRASHER,   HERB ELLIOTT,   SEBASTIAN COE,   STEVE OVETT,   DEREK IBBOTSON,   JOHN LANDY,   JIM RYUN,   ROGER BANNISTER,   STEVE CRAM,   NOUREDDINE MORCELI,   SYDNEY WOODERSON,   PETER SNELL,   JOHN WALKER,   ARNE ANDERSSON,   GUNDER HAGG
    Locations FRANCE,   ALGERIA,   LONDON,   ENGLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   FILBERT BAYI,   ITALY,   BRITAIN,   TANZANIA,   RIETI,   SWEDEN,   IFILEY ROAD,   ST GEORGE,   FINLAND,   IFFLEY ROAD,   TURKU,   OXFORD
    Misc NEW ZEALANDERS,   BRITON,   AMERICAN
    Bannister and friends remember a record OXFORD, England: After 40 years, about the only thing that hadn't changed at the Iffley Road track was the weather. The track had been resurfaced. The students who ran on it wore the latest in brand-name tennis shoes. A vending machine sold glucose based energy drinks. The flag, however, was still there. The same Cross of St George that fluttered in the wind and rain above the nearby church 40 years ago was being battered and soaked again on .Thursday. There was rain throughout the day, Roger Bannister told 11 other world mile record holders as he strolled around the track where he broke the four-minute barrier on May 6, 1954. It was quite a close-run thing, managing to do it in weather like this in May. The others, including American Jim Ryun, Australia's Herb Elliott, New Zealanders Peter Snell and John Walker and the current world record holder Noureddine Morceli, of Algeria, stood in the rain as Ban nister recalled the day he became one of the biggest sporting celebri ties of the 20th century. He remembered gazing up at the flag about 30 minutes before the race. The wind had died down. It was now or never. I thought if I don't make the attempt today, I may never forgive myself, Bannister recalled. I may pull a muscle tomorrow. I may fall under a bus, and we knew that John Landy and others were going to at tempt it. Those were the thoughts in my mind when the gun fired. The gun actually fired twice there was a false start before Christopher Brasher led the field with laps of 57.5, 60.7 and 62.3 seconds. The time was 3:00.4 with one lap to go. I heard the time three minutes, Bannister said. So I knew if I could do a last lap in 59 seconds, that would be the record. The winning time was 3:59.4. The stadium erupted as the time AP picture Sir Roger Bannister, seated left, and other record holders at the Iffley Road track, Oxford, where he ran the first sub-four-minute mile. was announced. A seemingly im penetrable barrier had been broken. The anniversary of Bannister's run brought together some of the greatest middle-distance runners of the 20th century. All had gained instant fame after breaking one of track's most-cherished records. Unlike many of his contempo raries, Bannister quit while at his peak. His record stood only 46 days before Landy ran 3:58 in Turku, Finland. In 40 years, the mile record has been broken 17 times! Morceli's mark, set in Rieti, Italy, last year, stands at 3:44.39. Before Morceli, Steve Cram had held the record for eight years after the focus in major international meets had long shifted to the 1500m, the so-called mctric mile . Yet for the assembled runners the mile will never lose its lustre. The other world-record milers at the Ifiley Road celebration were Arne Andersson, of Sweden; Briton Derek Ibbotson, Michel Jazy, of France; Filbert Bayi, of Tanzania; Landy and Cram. Sydney Wooderson, the oldest living record-holder, and Sebastian Coe will join the festivities in a gala dinner in London tomorrow, the actual anniversary of Bannister's achievement. The two other living record-hold ers, Gunder Hagg, of Sweden, and Steve Ovett, of Britain, were unable to attend.
  37. 1994-03-26 Article 118160504, score 10.536276 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN WILEY,   SANDY FORBES,   MORT ROSENBLUM
    Organisations AP,   NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO,   ABC RADIO,   NEWSWEEK,   CANBERRA TIMES,   TIME,   US NEWS,   CNN,   ASSOCIATED PRESS,   SBS,   ECONOMIST
    Locations AMERICA,   UNITED STATES,   PARIS
    Misc AMERICANS,   AUSTRALIANS,   WORLD REPORT,   GULF WAR,   AMERICAN,   AUSTRALIAN
    BOOKS Discouraging view of the journalism scene in US WHO STOLE THE NEWS? Why we can't keep up with what happens in the world and what we can do about it. By Mort Rosenblum. John Wiley and Sons. 298pp. 45. Reviewer: SANDY FORBES. IN THE news tonight ... a seasoned Associated Press foreign correspondent is claiming that media executives in America have stolen the news that is, pushed aside serious coverage of foreign news in favour of stuff they think will make money . We'll have details on that story later. But first ... Mort Rosenblum, who's based in Paris but roams the world as AP's special correspondent , provides plenty of pithy detail in this treatise which will fascinate international-news fetishists. Rosenblum has written on this subject before, in his 1979 book Coups and Earthquakes. In it, he criticised the traditional focus in foreign coverage on flood, famine and earthquakes, and on what corre- spondents refer to as bang-bang stories, at the expense of trying to explain complex and sometimes menacing issues. Fifteen years later, Rosenblum laments that for all of its flash and promise much of our coverage of news from beyond our borders is hardly better than it was in the days of Morse code . This book is his call to arms to American readers, listeners and viewers deprived of serious foreign coverage. With its chatty profiles of American foreign corre- spondents whose bylines and faces aren't readily rec- ognisable to Australians, it may none the less be of some interest. What may strike readers here, by comparison, in spite of some black holes, is that we are pretty well served by the Australian media in foreign coverage. While Australian newspapers maintain nothing like the number of foreign correspondents of their American counterparts, major papers such as The Sydney Morning Herald, The Australian and The Canberra Times do more than spray world news into the cracks. The coverage provided by ABC Radio and TV correspondents, and SBS's television news bulletins, ensures that we are well informed in this country. In all, Rosenblum paints a discouraging picture of the current American journalism scene. Since the watershed of Watergate, the press has turned into the media , and the credibility of editors and journalists has come increasingly under fire. Ironically, at a time when journalists covering the world are better equipped personally to seek and write the news than ever before, and are supported technologically in filing the news with devices only dreamed about a decade ago, Americans are being fed facile world briefs . While Americans can't find much foreign news in newspapers, the further irony is that although almost over-burdened with media , they can graze across 50-odd television stations without learning very much about the real world beyond their borders. Rosenblum's harshest criticism is aimed at television news executives who, convinced, that news is most significant the closer it is to home, have cut the space devoted to world news and now neglect all but major upheavals in prominent places. Television and radio (aside from National Public Radio) coverage of the world has dwindled, but many American newspapers and newsmagazines maintain strong staff numbers abroad. Yet the stories they write still don't get much of a run. The three ailing major American television networks, having lost revenue and viewers to a myriad of competitors in a recession, are closing foreign bureaus and pushing foreign news off the major nightly news bulletins. The result is that ratings-driven television executives reinforce the ignorance they assume in their audience. (News executives may be right in guessing the interest of the American reading public: the facts of life are that when Time, Newsweek and US News and World Report run foreign cover stories, sales fall 20 per cent below average.) Surveys show that about two-thirds of Americans depend mainly on television for their news. (More than one-third never read a newspaper.) CNN has been the television success story of the past decade. CNN's coverage of the Gulf War demonstrated its possibilities of telling the world what is happening, in real time . CNN has the advantage, with its many correspond- ents on the scene, its financial resources, and with 24 hours a day at its disposal, to provide serious background, but it too succumbs to showbiz. Rosenblum's advice to Americans from whom serious world news has been mugged, muffled and muzzled is to search more widely (read The Economist and The Guardian Weekly, he suggests) and to demand more. Aroused consumers brought back Classic Coke. They ought to be able to keep us from ignorance in a perilous world.
  38. 1994-04-28 Article 118115966, score 10.471661 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MIKE MOORE,   CARLOS SALINASDE GORTARI,   RENATO RUGGERIO,   PETER SUTHERLAND,   RU BENS RICUPERO
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION COM,   FINANCE,   GATT,   WTO,   WORLD TRADE ORGANISATION
    Locations BRAZIL,   GENEVA PETER SUTHERLAND,   NEW ZEALAND,   UNITED STATES,   URUGUAY,   MEXICO
    Misc GENER AL AGREEMENT ON TARIFFS,   IRISH,   ITALIAN
    1 Head of GATT to quit this year . J From JOHN ZAROCOSTAS In Geneva PETER SUTHERLAND, di rector-General of the Gener al Agreement on Tariffs and Trade told senior trade officials this week that he plans to step down from his post by the end of the year. Mr Sutherland, who was fav oured to become the first director general of GATT's successor body the World Trade Organisation (WTO), gave personal reasons for the decision, senior diplomatic sources said. But even before Mr Sutherland formally conveyed his wishes, a long list of potential candidates' ' names began to circulate in diplo matic and trade ministerial circles. Among the names cited as seri ous contenders are. those of Mike Moore, former Prime Minister of New Zealand; the President of Mexico, Carlos Salinasde Gortari; Brazil's Minister of Finance Ru bens Ricupero, a former GATT ambassador; and former Italian ; Trade Minister Renato Ruggerio. The list is expected to grow as capitals worldwide contemplate about sponsoring a candidate. Mr Sutherland, a former Irish politician, European Union Com petition Commissioner, and chief business executive, managed in the space of less than six months after he took over as GATT chief last July to bring to a successful finale the seven-year Uruguay Round of trade liberalisation talks on De cember 15. The selection process for a new trade chief would be completed by mid fall at the latest , a high lev el US official said. Peter Sutherland: will be a hard act to follow. But, added, it all depends on how many qualified candidates present themselves. An official from a major trading power who requested anonymity said the criteria for the new chief are still to be decided, but noted: it will have to be'somebody with a political profile and political clout . Similarly, the' view of another high-ranking official was that the new WTO chief would have to be someone who can build an organi sation. In other words somebody who is a good political operator and also has bureaucratic skills. However, it's yet to be decided whether the new chief will be from an industrialised or a developing country. A foreign minister from a large developing country said, I think the candidate should not be discri minated either by region or catego ry of country. I am sure there are many pos sible candidates in the developing world that could fill the post. GATT Ambassadors from both rich and poor countries said they were sorry about Mr Sutherland's departure, and stressed he would be. a hard act to follow . In the last 10 months the gregar ious but stern Irishman used his acute political and negotiating skills to broker compromises on sensitive trade issues. And, he displayed a sense of fairness which attracted both ap plause and respect from all quar ters.
  39. 1994-03-06 Article 118156133, score 10.456763 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN JAMES
    Misc DECAYING,   BOOK
    Book Two Decaying belief in the dentist J UST what I need: another reason not to go to the dentist. Just when my terror begins to shrink to manageable proportions I start having dreams in which the dentist smiles reassuringly, tells me that yes, of course he uses an autoclave to sterilise his equipment, then reaches behind his back to pick up a blood-encrusted jabber thingie from his tray. Who can you trust these days? I'mean, I do not even know what an autoclave looks like so I would be a perfect victim for a deceitful dentist. The autoclave/no autoclave dream alternates with the one (in retrospect perhaps 1 should call them nightmares) in'which my teeth fall out, one by one. Of late, a new twist has insinuated itself into this dream. Bits of my jawbone fall off as well. In the very latest development, I am trying vainly to fit bits of my jaw back into my head when my unattended tod dler toddles off across the road in front of several trucks. Talk about conflicting demands. Yes, I know, there are places people like me can go to get help. I do not need to be told that my fear of dentists is irrational, just as people who fear flying do not need someone spouting statistics regarding their chances of being killed in a car accident visra-vis their chances of spending sev eral terrifying, mind-blowing minutes plunging earthward in a 747 trying to scribble a farewell note on a sickbag before being ripped into a million pain ful, bleeding shreds as the plane ex plodes on impact. Logic has nothing to do with fear. It is actually quite strange that I should fear dentists. I am a member of the fluoride generation. I sport just two, tiny, white fillings in my mouth, and 1 did not get those until 1 was almost 30. I should be one of those people who leaps gaily at the opportunity of a visit to the dentist, seeing it as an chance to further reassure myself of the strides that dental hygiene has made in just a generation. As I said, logic has nothing to do with it. My fear of dentists was well-estab lished even before I found out about my impacted wisdom teeth. Once I knew of that terrible bodily treachery, the pho bia just grew. The x-rays told the whole stpry. The roots of the teeth were wrapped around my jawbone rather as strangler vines encase large trees in a rainforest. It was a case for General Anaesthetic. Now if there is one thing which scares me more than dentists, it is general anaesthetic. You can die under general anaesthetic. In certain circumstances, dying under general anaesthetic is ac ceptable: during a heart transplant, for instance, or similar, major surgery. But there is no way I am going to die under general anaesthetic having my wisdom teeth out or having an ingrown toenail collected. I demand a death which ex cites pathos, not bathos. Armed with the x-ray evidence, I knew one thing. I didn't want to enter the big sleep at the end of a needle, and I knew I could not endure major rain-de forestation in my mouth while I was awake. I would just have to tough this one out. I did so for a few years, endur ing the frequent throbbing infections in my wisdom teeth with, I like to think, a degree of martyrdom. I did not com plain. Overly. Finally, of course, I did the inevita ble. I was booked into John James pri vate hospital to have the things ripped oyt under general anaesthetic, lodging my will with my lawyer on the way. . - You can imagine my relief when, as the date of the big op drew near, I discovered I was pregnant. I do not want you to think that I became preg nant to avoid having my teeth out, or anything like that, but it is true that I was almost sobbing with relief as I rang to cancel the appointment. Two babies later, I visited a dentist again, for a second opinion. The news was brilliant. 1 had neglected my wis dom teeth so badly that the jawbone in which they were embedded had practi cally decayed away: there were big dark blotches on the new x-ray, where there should have been shimmering white bone. No problem, this new, toothy, smil ing dentist assured me. they would pop out, in the chair, with no drama. Of course, he would just do two to begin with, in case there was any swelling and so on. They did come out easily. The whole episode took about 30 seconds. An in jection, a brief crunching noise, and one side of my face was free. After all those years. There was no swelling and utterly no pain, either during the extraction or afterwards (perhaps a few nerve end ings were destroyed during the years of chronic infection). That was about two years ago. I haven't yet summoned up the courage to have the other two out. But I will, just as soon as I figure out whether to save my toddler or the jawbone. Just as soon as I ask my dentist if he has an autoclave. Just as soon as I believe him.
  40. 1994-07-04 Article 118188652, score 10.432287 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN RALPH,   RALPH WILLIS,   KEITH SCOTT,   JOHN GREIG,   JOHN PRESCOTT,   PETER COSTEL
    Organisations CHANNEL NINE,   BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA,   BHP,   REAL ESTATE INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA
    Locations CANBERRA,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   UNITED STATES
    Misc NETWORK,   AUSTRALIAN
    Rates rise 'not justified' By KEITH SCOTT The managing director of BHP, John Prescott, said yesterday that he could see no justification for a rise in official interest rates at this time and there was a risk that peo ple pushing for rises could be talking down the economy. Mr Prescott's comments came as the shadow treasurer, Peter Costel lo, said Australia would follow the lead of the United States in raising official interest rates and it was really just a question now of when . The Treasurer, Ralph Willis, has continued to play down the need for an early rise, saying on Thursday that increases in bond yields in Aus tralia were linked to increases in the US and not on any cold analysis of what is happening to our economic future . Although not commenting ex plicitly on Mr Costcllo's remarks, Mr Prescott also appeared yester day to disagree with the shadow treasurer's view of the reasons be hind fears in the financial markets about interest rates and inflation. Mr Prescott said on Channel Nine's Business Sunday program that the instability was due to speculative activity and over-reac tion to events that are not so mate rial to Australia . I do not think it is reflecting the fundamentals of what is going on in Australia, especially recognising that our interest rates were already high in real terms, he said. I certainly do not see any basis for assuming that Australia's posi tion has deteriorated relative to the major markets of the world in re cent weeks. In fact, I think it is fair to say that our position has continued to improve relative to what is going on in other parts of the world. Asked if there were a lot of peo ple out there seemingly talking down the economy , Mr Prescott said, well, I think there is a risk of that. I think we are trying to say things are not as good as they are and I think that is foolish . Mr Costello said in a separate interview on the same program that recent rises in bond yields in Aus tralia had been fuelled by interna tional events to some degree . Continued on Page 2. Rates rise is 'not justified' Continued from Page 1 But they had risen higher in Australia than in the US because of the Government's economic pol icy settings. If [the Government] had not squibbed the opportunity to get further progress on the deficit, in terest rates would not have gone off as soon and they would not have gone off as high, Mr Costel lo said. Mr Costello said Australia will follow rises in official interest rates in the US. Nobody wants higher interest rates and least of all [the Opposition], but if the pres sures are out there in the market, it is very hard to resist it and if Government economic policy set tings are not right, they feed into it. He received some support for his views from the president of the Business Council of Australia, John Ralph, who said interest rates were being affected by internation al events, but Australian rates were higher than rates in many other countries. Now, our real interest rates are higher than many of our compet ing nations ... and the risk is that they could go higher, he said on Network Ten's Meet the Press. But I do not think that you can jaw-bone interest rates up or down. They are really set in the marketplace. The president of the Real Estate Institute of Australia, John Greig, echoed Mr Prescott's comments on interest rates, saying concern about rises was misplaced. Mr Greig was commenting on the institute's May Market Fuels survey. which showed little change in the price of housing in the capi tal cities last month. Mr Greig said the survey dissipates the financial markets' concerns that the housing sector is driving inflation . The survey showed the median house price in Sydney increased 0.5 per cent to SI92,500. Canberra re corded a fall in the median house price, by O.l per cent to SI60.800.
  41. 1994-05-11 Article 118210767, score 10.396761 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People RALPH WILLIS,   IAN DAVIS,   GERARD NOONAN,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN KERIN,   BUI KERIN,   JOHN DAWKINS
    Organisations BUDGET,   FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BUDGETS,   TREASURY BONDS,   PAYE,   COMMONWEALTH,   FINANCE MINISTRY,   AUSTRALIAN SECURITIES COMMIS SION,   RESERVE BANK,   WORKING NATION,   PARLIAMENT,   TELSTRA,   WILLIS/KEATING,   TREASURY
    Locations CANBERRA,   AUSTRALIA,   AUSTRA
    Misc WORKING NATION MEA,   WORKING NATION WHITE PAPER,   AUSTRALIAN
    TJDGET '94 Strategy depends on business investment recovery in 1994-95 Budget closely tied to economic growth By IAN DAVIS, Finance Editor The Government is forecasting a strong improvement in both the economy and the Budget outcome. It is expecting the deficit to fall from 13.6 billion to 11.7 billion and eco nomic growth is forecast to rise from 4 to 4.5 per cent, despite a weakening in housing and in net exports two of the key components of economic growth during the current financial year. The improved Budget outcome is closely tied to the improvement in the national economy. On each front it is depending on a big turnaround in a major component. Its forecast for a continuing strong im provement in the economy requires the long-hoped-for and much discussed re covery in business investment to actually occur in 1994-95. After increasing by a barely noticeable 1 per cent in the (current) 1993-94 finan cial year it is expected to grow by an extremely strong 14.5 per cent in 199495. After contributing an insignificant amount to 1993-94's economic growth of 4 per cent, the Government is looking to business investment to provide about 1.5 percentage points of the 4.5 per cent growth in 1994-95. The big turnaround in business invest ment is the key component in maintain ing and strengthening economic growth. After having achieved an expected 4 per cent economic growth rate in 1993-94 compared to the 2.75 per cent anticipated for 1993-94 in last August's Budget, the Government is this year expecting to nudge economic growth up a further 0.5 percentage point, despite an expected fall in housing and net exports, two of the key stnits of this year's 4 per cent growth rate. Because for the first time the Budget is early (before the end of the financial year) it contains also for the first time forecasts rather than actual figures for the 1993-94 financial year. Housing spending which is expected to grow bv 9 per cent in 1993-94 (after an even stronger 13.3 per cent rise in 1992-93) is expected to plateau out at the 1993-94 level in 1994-95, with a forecast 0.5 per cent growth. Strong export growth (despite weak world demand) and weaker import erowth means that net exports are expect SUMMARY OF BUDGET ESTIMATES 1993-94 1994-95 Estimate Real Growth Per cent Estimate Real Growth Per cent m Of GDP m of GDP OUTLAYS 114513 3.0 26.6 120633 3.1 26.2 REVENUE Tax 94171 3.9 21.9 103325 7.4 22.5 NonTax 6749 18.1 1.6 5581 -19.1 1.2 Total 100920 4.7 23.4 108906 5.6 23.7 BALANCE 13593 3.2 -11727 2.5 ed to grow by 0.75 per cent in 1993-94 (the current financial year). But in 1994-95 export growth is expected to weaken slightly from 7.75 per cent to 7 per cent, still a healthy level with most of the world still in recession or low growth, while imports are expected to rise by'9 per cent compared to 5 per cent in 1993-94. This is inevitable with the strong rise in investment, which will suck in increased imports. The weaker net export performance is expected to see the current account defi cit rise from 16 billion in 1993-94 to 18 billion in 1994-95. The current account deficit will rise from 3.75 per cent to 4 per cent of gross domestic product The build-up of stocks by business and Government trading enterprises as Aus tralia has come out of the recession has added to economic growth. While this will continue to contribute to growth in 1994-95 it will be at a low level in creasing by 0.25 per cent in 1994-95 com pared to 0.5 per cent in 1993-94. The largest contribution to economic growth in 1993-94 however, was made by private spending on consumption which rose by 3.25 per cent. Private consump tion spending will remain the largest con tributor to growth in 1994-95, rising even more strongly at 4.25 per cent and ac counting for about 2.5 percentage points of the 4.5 per cent total economic growth. Inflation is forecast to push up a little from 1.75 per cent to 2.25 per cent, but is still a relatively low inflation rate by in ternational standards, with economic growth a strong 4.5 per cent Wages are also forecast to rise more strongly: at 3.5 per cent compared to 2.5 percent in 1993-94. The strong economic growth is expect ed to produce a stronger 3 per cent growth in employment. This compares to 2 per cent in 1993-94,0 in 1992-93 and a fall of 1.9 per cent in 1991-92. But the stronger employment growth will still see unemployment at an average of 9.75 per cent for the year, compared to 10.5 percent in 1993-94, as the improved economy draws people who had dropped out of paid employment in the recession back into the labour force. The labour force participation rate is expected to rise from 62.75 per cent to 63.25 per cent. The Government is looking for a much improved Budget deficit in 1994-95 of 11.7 billion as a result of strong revenue especially tax growth through a combination of the ef fects of stronger economic growth and the big tax increases included in last year's Budget. The Budget papers note that each 0.25 percentage point increase in economic growth will produce an extra 1.4 billion in revenue in 1997-98 and the increase from higher growth in 1995-96 will be only slightly less. Despite the 6.5 billion in new spend ing announced last week in the Working Nation White Paper, 1.07 billion of which will occur in the 1994-95 financial year, the Government forecasts that spending will rise by only 3.1 per cent next year to 120.6 billion, little different from the increase of 3 per cent in this year's Budget. The increased spending on Working Nation programs plus the in creases in spending on health and Aborig inal affairs have meant rises in spending little different from those in 1993-94, when a large number of election promises were honoured and when the Govern ment bore the cost of increased labour market program expenditure. Much of the increased labour market training program expenditure, which was assumed to be for one year only in the 1993-94 Budget, has continued in 1994-95 under the Working Nation mea sures. Total government spending in 1994-95 is expected to be 26.2 per cent of gross domestic product, down from 26.6 percent in 1993-94. Even in its medium-term forecasts, the Working Nation spending is forecast to be contained. Spending in 1995-96 is forecast to rise by 3.2 per cent, then to fall by 0.1 per cent in 1996-97 and then rise again by 0.8 per cent in 1997-98. Economic growth during 1993-94 is now expected to be 4 per cent, compared to an expected 2.75 per cent for 1993-94 when the Budget was put together last August. This higher than expected growth is now expected to produce a Budget deficit of 13.6 billion in 1993-94 compared to the previously expected deficit of 16 billion. From this expected outcome for the as-yet-unfinished 1993-94 financial year, it is forecast the deficit will fall by a little under 2 billion to 11.7 billion in 1994-95. But with the economy growing strong ly, the 2 billion fall in the deficit pro duces a marked decrease in the deficit as a proportion of total economic activity: the deficit will fall from 3.2 per cent of GDP (it had been forecast at 3.8 per cent in last year's Budget) in 1993-94 to 2.5 per cent of GDP in 1994-95. This gets the deficit back to the same level, as a proportion of GDP, that it was in 1991-92 near the beginning of the re cession and before government spending increased to offset the collapse in eco nomic activity. In future years, or out years in Trea sury-speak, the deficit is forecast to fall progressively to 2 per cent of GDP in 1995-96,0.9 per cent in 1996-97 and 0.4 per cent in 1997-98. The stronger economic growth and the flow-through of the controversial and widely unpopular tax changes introduced by then Treasurer John Dawkins in last year's Budget (increases in sales tax and petrol excise) have meant that the medi um term deficit reduction strategy has been accelerated. Instead of the Government forecasting that the deficit would be down to 1.1 per cent of GDP ( 5.8 billion) by 1996-97 as it did in last year's Budget, it now expects to wind the deficit back to 0.9 per cent of GDP ( 4.8 billion) by 1996-97. (The medium-term deficit reduction strategy was forced on the Government last year because of financial market con cern that spending promises made during the election would cause the deficit to blow out in the years to 1996-97.) The improvement in the deficit is largely due to the interplay of the rela tively modest (3.1 per cent) rise in spend ing and the strong rise rise in revenue. Revenue is up strongly even though there is no increase in tax rates and virtually no changes in non-tax revenue measures. Spending will rise by around 3 bil lion, while total revenue grows by 5.6 per cent or about 8 billion to 108.9 billion. The magnitude of this increase is the more remarkable because non-tax reve nues are expected to fall by 19 per cent to 5.6 billion. The big rise in non-tax revenue in 1994-95 (primarily payments to the Gov ernment from the Reserve Bank profits on its currency trading activities and the dividend from Telstra) made a major contribution to total revenues. But in 1995-96 the big fall in non-tax revenues will be more than offset by a 7.4 per cent increase in tax collections from 94.2 billion to 103.3 billion. Tax collections from individuals are expected to rise by 8.2 per cent, with PAYE payments up 8.1 per cent to 48.2 billion and other individual payments (mainly capital gains tax) up 17 per cent to 9.2 billion. Company tax collections are expected to rise by 7 per cent to 13.9 billion, taxation on superannuation funds is to rise by 27 per cent to 1.6 billion and fringe benefits tax collections by a mas sive 130.7 per cent to 3.2 billion. Indirect tax collections are expected to rise by 8.3 per cent to 26.7 billion, with sales tax up 7.7 per cent to 11.2 billion, petrol excise up 12.6 per cent to 9.7 billion (partly offset by a fall of 18.7 per cent to 870 million in collections of petroleum rent resource tax) and other excises up 6.3 per cent to 2.6 billion. But there are virtually no new tax mea sures announced in the Budget. Those new measures that are included will add only an estimated 345 million (out of total revenue of 108.9 billion) in 1994-95, of which 300 million will come from increased (but unspecified) compli ance activity by the Australian Tax Of fice. Changes in departure tax arrange ments will add 5 million (rising to 12 million in 1995-96) and increased char ges by the Australian Securities Commis sion will raise an additional 40 million. The expected deficit of 11.7 billion will require total government borrowings of 20.4 billion compared to an expected 19.3 billion in 1993-94. In addition to the 11.7 billion to cov er the Budget shortfall, the Government will need a further 6.2 billion to roll-over maturing Treasury Bonds, 104 million to cover redemptions of Austra lian Savings Bonds, 1.2 billion to cover repayments of foreign currency debts of the Commonwealth Government and 1.1 billion to cover superannuation pay ments of Commonwealth public servants and employees of Government trading enterprises. The net public sector borrowing re quirement is expected to fall from 3.4 per cent of GDP in 1993-94 to 2.6 per cent in 1994-95 and the Commonwealth's PSBR. to fall from 3.3 per cent to 2.7 per cent. The Budget forecasts a large 29 per cent rise in public debt interest pay ments to 8.4 billion and Treasurer Ralph Willis told the said yesterday (it is not flagged in the Budget papers) that this is based on the expectation of slightly higher interest rates. Treasurer Willis: one who eventually got lucky Treasurer Ralph Willis is one of those people who eventually gets lucky. Not that the Government's dourest performer would admit it. Mr Willis for long smarted at being passed over as Treasurer, the position he had coveted from the earliest days of the Hawke Gov ernment. Instead, he was forced to look over the fence at the unorthodox antics of the one-time world's greatest Treasurer as Paul Keating forced change after change on the Australian economy and reaped the political accolades. Willis had the briefest flirtation as Treasurer in the vacuum left by the sud den departure of John Kerin in late 1991, but the Keating favourite, John Dawkins, nudged him back to the hard, unreward ing parsimony of the Finance Ministry. Bui Kerin and Dawkins and Hawke are all gone. Willis, at long last, has the Treasury reins. It is thus appropriate that his first Bud get it a steady sort of affair, entirely in keeping with his political style. The big-ticket spending items to the Utneof S 6.5 biJiion in the next four years in the Employment White Paper have GERARD NOONAN already been announced with the maxi mum amount of fanfare a week ago. In a Budget of approximately Si 20 bil lion in Government outlays this year, most of which is recurrent expenditure, that's the lion's share of the sexy items. What's left is the sort of budgetary housekeeping in which Willis revels. Despite his long and unwilling appren ticeship, Willis must be aware that his timing couldn't have been better. As he boasted himself in Parliament last night, Australia's economic funda mentals are the best they've been for 30 years. Inflation is at its lowest level since the early 1960s, interest rates are (relatively) modest, employment growth is on the up and unemployment has clearly eased back from its 11 per cent peak to 10.3 per cent. Wage pressures are in check, industrial disputes are at a three-decade low, pro ductivity is rising, consumer confidence is high and economic growth in 1993/94 is on target at 4 per cent, with the Trea sury bureaucrats projecting 4.5 for next year. The Government has been able to keep the Budget deficit for this year to 13.6 billion, on its way to a projected deficit by 1997/98 (that is, within four years) of just over 2 billion. It is appropriate that his first budget is a steady sort of affair, entirely in keeping with his political style' This would represent a Government funding shortfall well within last year's promise of 1 per cent of Australia's total economic output by 1997. Good news, nearly all of it, and the person at the microphone is none other than the ultra-patient Ralph Willis. But two shadows hover over this pris tine fiscal landscape. First is the state of business investment A close reading of the Willis/Keating strategy makes it clear that a great deal of the hope for the Government's deficit-re duction program rests on a sharp turn around in business investment. The optimistic projections rely almost entirely on plus-4 per cent annual growth in the economy, extending right through to the end of the decade. Mr Willis says he expects business in vestment to come into play in a big way, that the conditions for takeoff in business investment are very favourable, and so on. But his Budget speech, in this one area, has a plaintive air about it. Continued strong economic growth, near-record high profit levels, high busi ness confidence, low interest rates and inflation, sharply rising capacity utilisa tion and the completion of the process of corporate balance sheet repair following the excesses of the 1980s, are all condu cive factors for increased business invest ment, the Treasurer said. In addition the Government has cre ated a very favourable tax regime for business over recent years. All this represents a powerful set of inducements for increased business in vestment, which is forecast to grow by 14.5 per cent in 1994/95. Did we hepr that right? Fourteen and a half per cent? This optimism contrasts with a far from upbeat comment by Mr Willis a little earlier in his Budget speech. So far business investment had made little contribution to economic recovery, he stated bluntly. Dead right. The accompanying Budget papers note that business investment fell to a record low of 8.7 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 1992/93 after peaking at a record high in 1988/89 of 12.4 per cent of GDP. The papers argue, like the Treasurer, that the investment environment has be come increasingly favourable. With demand growing strongly and the capital stock at a low level, the ability of business to maintain supply will be come increasingly difficult without addi tional investment. Quite so. But that sense of plaintive urging is unmistakeable. Treasury knows as well as Ralph Willis that the factors which influence business investment decisions are those which move the animal spirits of the markets with Federal Government Budgets being only one of many. Yet Willis, and this Budget's long-term growth strategy owes a good deal to get ting that particular one right. Confidence in the figures is the second cloud on the Budget's horizon. This year's Budget deficit, for instance, was 2.4 billion lower than was forecast last budget time a pleasant impreci sion allowing Mr Willis to assuage mar ket concerns that the Government has gone soft on its deficit-reduction strategy. But if Treasury can be that far out, what should one make of the projections which have the deficit at a mere 2 billion in 1997/98? This is done by projecting total govern ment revenue from 101 billion this year to 135 billion in 1997/98 (a gross in crease of 34 per cent). Over the same period, government ex: penditure is projected to rise to 137 billion (an increase of a far more modest 21 percent). The overall impression gained from this year's Budget is of a Government lucky, and delighted, to have survived the rigours of the recession. If Ralph Willis was of a mind to, he'd might be moved to call it a Let 'cr rip Budget, confident in the expectation that inflation is in the cage for the present. But his urging would be muted by the knowledge and the reality that Australia's economy and a good deal of its corpo rate optimism is hostage to the she nanigans on Wall Street. Getting it even three-quarters right in Canberra at Budget time is only part of the answer.
  42. 1994-04-18 Article 118113988, score 10.3706875 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BARRY MORRIS,   PHIL KOPERBERG,   JOHN PASCOE,   BOB CARR
    Organisations OPTUS,   BLUE MOUNTAINS GAZETTE,   NINE NETWORK,   MAJOR CRIME SQUAD,   STATE LIBERAL,   NSW BUSH FIRE SERVICES,   PARLIAMENT
    Locations SYDNEY,   BLUE MOUNTAINS
    Misc OPPOSI,   ITALIAN,   LIBERALS
    Accused MP vows to fight to e nd SYDNEY: The embattled State Liberal MP Barry Morris broke his silence on his political future last night, vowing to fight alle gations that he had made telephoned bomb and death threats last year. Mr Morris has been in seclu sion since the startling allega tions were raised in Parliament by the Leader of the Opposi tion, Bob Carr, on Tuesday. In an interview on the Nine Network last night, he said he intended to be around for a lqng time to come . No way will I resign. Pro viding my health holds up I will be there when the whips are cracking. Mr Morris's seat, the Blue Mountains, is one of the Gov ernment's most marginal and would fall to the ALP with an antigovernment swing of only 2.7 per cent. The seat is one of a handful of marginal government-held seats ALP strategists are target ing in the lead-up to next year's state election. Mr Morris said last night that the Government's growing voter support in the Blue Mountains was behind the ALP's attack on him. He said, We are doing par ticularly well in the polls here and these guys are very wor ried, and they have resorted to these guttersnipe tactics. I can't offer any other explanation. Mr Carr produced a copy of Mr Morris's Optus telephone account last week to back alle gations that Mr Morris, using a fake Italian accent, had threatened to kill Blue Moun tains Councillor John Pascoe and bomb the council and Blue Mountains Gazette newspaper. The threat was recorded in June on the Gazette's telephone answering machine. The ALP produced an expert voice analysis suggesting that Mr Morris was the author of the recorded message. The Major Crime Squad is i investigating the Opposition's allegations, and police have re opened inquires into a series of earlier death threats made to Mr Pascoe. Police are also re-examining the still-unsolved March 1992 bombing of the council. Mr Morris had spent the last week working with his lawyers in a bid to clear his name, Lib eral sources said. Government officials are ex amining the way the ALP has handled the matter, to see if the Opposition might have ob structed the course of justice in withholding certain information from police. Members of the Major Crime Squad have interviewed a senior Opposition staff mem ber about the allegations and have taken into custody a number of Opposition docu ments relating to the matter. Government officials are ask ing why the Opposition did not take the material to the police when it was first made aware of it several months ago. You are not meant to con ceal an offence or withhold in formation that might be con nected with an offence, one source said. Liberal officials said yester day that despite his determina tion to remain in Parliament, senior government figures had discussed the possibility of re signation with Mr Morris. In talks with senior govern ment members last week Mr Morris had had all the op tions spelt out to him , includ ing his resignation from Parlia ment in the event that the allegations began to damage the Government. Liberal strategists are be lieved to have begun work al ready on preparing for a by-election in the Blue Moun tains should Mr Morris be forced to resign. On Friday it was rumoured that the high-profile Commis sioner of the NSW Bush Fire Services, Phil Koperberg, had been approached to contest the seat for the Liberals in the event of a by-election. Mr Koperberg, a Blue Mountains resident, ruled out a political career firmly and said he had no political affiliations and was happy in his present job.
  43. 1994-10-31 Article 118295164, score 10.36881 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BRADLEY CLYDE,   BOB FULTON,   BEVAN HANNAN SEATS,   DOUG LAUGHTON,   SHAUN ED,   JONATHAN DAVIES,   SHAUN EDWARDS,   BOBBY GOULDING,   JOHN HOLDS,   GRAHAM ANNESLEY
    Organisations LADBROKES,   LEEDS,   ST HELEN,   ST HELENS,   LIONS
    Locations OLD TRAFFORD,   WALES,   WEMBLEY,   GREAT BRITAIN,   AUSTRALIA,   HALIFAX,   AUSTRA,   ELLAND ROAD,   MANCHESTER
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   TEST,   WEM,   ROO TOUR,   ENGLISH,   WELSH,   AUSTRALIAN
    Test tickets now prized possessions ! ROO TOUR I [NOTEBOOK! By Bevan Hannan Seats to the second and third Tests between Great Britain and Australia have become prized possessions for ticket touters. The Lions' first Test triumph at Wembley has sparked unprece dented interest in rugby league, signalling a stampede for tickets this week. By Wednesday, both the Old Trafford and Elland Road Tests were sell-outs, generating a re cord 2.6 million ( A5.9m) in gate receipts and surpassing the 1.8 million ( A4.1m) record for the 1990 series. Old Trafford, Manchester, holds 44,000 while the Elland Road, Leeds, capacity is 39,000 which will boost series crowd figures to 144,034 - also a record for Tests between the two nations in this country. Betting agencies have also re ported a nice collect from the First Test result, which left plen ty of blank faces on Australians in the Wembley stands who back ed the Kangaroos to complete a clean sweep. Then there was the punter who was up on his feet staring down the barrel of a 10-1 motza when Bradley Clyde burst into the clear mid-way through the first half. Ladbrokes had Clyde in stalled at the generous odds for being first try-scorer in the Test and he would have been a fair bet to make the try-line if it were not for that tackle by Lions' skip per Shaun Edwards. The Great Britain players picked up 4000 (SA9090) each for their victory bonus. ? ?? Ask any retired Great Britain rugby league player to name the highlight of their career and play ing at Wembley is usually the an swer. And if they have never played at Wembley you can be sure that will be the lowlight. That is the type of passion Great Britain took into the first Test. For the league players from the north it is a huge buzz venturing into the south and pulling off a major coup on soccer's hallowed turf. No player demonstrated this feeling more than St Helen's half back Bobby Goulding. There was heartfelt pride in the manner he belted out every word to God Save the Queen: Goulding made the most of his opportunity back at the Lions' scrum base after the Shaun Ed wards dismissal. The gifted half has left a trail of destruction with a series of clubs - including smashing the car windows of Doug Laughton after a fall-out with the Leeds boss. Now with St Helens, Goulding is the form player of the league and the bad boy may finally be turning good A sour sidelight to the Wem bley Test was Wales television failing to screen a live telecast of the match, instead plumping for a club rugby union match. Just one week before yester day's international between Wales and Australia, the Test held major interest for the Welsh, especially considering the impact homeboy Jonathan Davies had on the match. ? ?? English referee John Holds worth has revealed that English whistle blowers are under in struction to get between players when there is any hint of a fight blowing up. Holdsworth, the man Austra lian coach Bob Fulton said ran like he had a wooden leg in the Halifax tour match, said this practice has resulted in him cop ping the odd punch across the head. But he says he has got his own back. He recalls the time he raised both arms for a play-on call and whacked a lumbering prop forward with a whistle, splitting the player's mouth open. Australian Graham Annesley also admits to accidently striking a player in the same manner.
  44. 1994-11-08 Article 130536206, score 10.305544 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN FAULKNER,   PAUL CHAMBERLIN,   DAVID BELLA,   CHERYL KERNOT,   PAUL KEATING,   DAVID BEDDALL
    Organisations PM AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE,   LABOR,   FRANKLIN,   SENATE,   LOCAL GOVERNMENT NATIONAL ASSEMBLY,   FOREST EMBASSY
    Locations FRANKLIN DAM,   CANBERRA,   AUSTRALIA,   EAST GIPPSLAND
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   AUSTRALIAN DEMOCRATS,   BRITISH
    Forestry protesters chip directly at PM Australian Federal Police officers remove a protester from the National Convention Centre yesterday. By PAUL CHAMBERLIN Demonstrations to save native forests from woodchipping moved into top gear yesterday with protests aimed directly at the Prime Minister and claims by British botanist David Bella my that forestry practices he had seen here were nothing short of vandalism . Professor Bellamy, here to visit the East Gippsland forests, and what is believed to be the largest-girthed tree on mainland Australia, said he would be prepared to revise his strategic role in helping prevent the Franklin Dam if Australians wanted him to. Others of the 2000 people in Canberra for the five-day Forest Embassy took action yesterday to make sure Paul Keating was aware of their concerns. Mr Keating was forced to enter the National Convention Centre through a back entrance after about 200 demonstrators attempted to line his pathway into the building, planning to fall as if cut down. Police forced most back on to the footpath and removed others who lay on the roadway leading into the centre, where Mr Keating was to speak to the Local Government National Assembly. Two protesters made it into the theatre, but were also removed as Mr Keating sat down and they unfurled a banner and began chanting anti-logging slogans. There were no arrests. Later, shouting protesters were removed from the Senate and the House of Representa- tives. The Prime Minister has declined to meet a delegation of the protesters, as has the Minister for the Environment, John Faulkner. Mr Keating has no direct in- volvement in the annual approval of export woodchip licences. This is the area of the Minister for Resources, David Beddall, who is expected to receive advice from Senator Faulkner within the next fortnight on each of the 11 licences, either new or up for renewal. If Senator Faulkner decides Mr Beddall's decisions are incorrect, the matter can be forced to Cabinet and into Mr Heating's sphere of influence. The Forest Embassy, staged by all major national and regional conservation groups, winds up today after five days. Professor Bellamy said Australia would be judged internationally by its performance in protecting native forests. Allowing Australia's forest heritage to be woodchipped will downgrade Australia's standing as an environmentally responsible nation. This Government will be in for a rude shock ... if it cannot lift its game on environmental issues. He said he could sense a growing and unstoppable momentum, much like the ground swell which won the Franklin in 1983 . The Leader of the Australian Democrats, Cheryl Kernot, said Labor had no sign of a policy on phasing out woodchipping in native forests by 2000. On Friday, the Government was presented with a list of 764 areas of forest which environ- mentalists believe had high con- servation value, but the Government had made no move to protect these areas, she said.
  45. 1994-08-24 Article 118264491, score 10.303728 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DYSON HORE-LACY,   JOHN BIRT,   ANDREW SCOTT
    Organisations AFL,   FITZROY,   AFL PLAYERS' ASSOCIATION,   LIONS,   AFL COMMISSION
    Locations MELBOURNE,   ST KILDA,   NORTH MELBOURNE
    Misc AUSTRALIAN
    Brave-faced Lions view the future MELBOURNE: The victim of the AFL's five-year plan was putting on a brave face yesterday as it considered the league's vision for the future. Widely seen as the death warrant for the embattled Fitzroy club, the plan outlines the AFL's goals to the turn of of the century. Although it failed to identify Fitzroy directly, the AFL manifesto clearly makes no provision for the club in its no-pay-no-play philosophy. But Fitzroy officials were adamant yesterday the club could comply with the AFL's new financial criteria. Lions' president Dyson Hore-Lacy said that although he was not surprised by the contents of the plan, it was nevertheless unfair. A major plank in the AFL's desire to preserve financial integrity is a requirement for all clubs to be audited up to seven months before the start of a season. This is seen as one main obstacle to the continuation of Fitzroy's 100 years in Australian Football. Hore-Lacy, who is also a barrister, said the AFL's new conditions were much the same as existing company law and the Lions had received professional advice they were acting within the law in continuing to trade. If we thought we were breaching the companies code we wouldn't be trading, he said. Hore-Lacy has ac- knowledged that Fitzroy owes 2.2 million, but says it is able to meet its debts when they fall due. The Fitzroy boss said the five-year plan contained nothing the club had not expected, although he was pleased they didn't expel us . Fitzroy general manager John Birt echoed his president's views. We know we've got to pay our bills and that's what we've done in the past, Birt said. I don't think it's all gloom and doom for Fitzroy. While no move has been made against Fitzroy, that prospect is likely to be discussed at the AFL Commission's next meeting on September 2. Other clubs such as St Kilda and North Melbourne, who are also sailing close to the financial borderline, seem likely to escape any immediate push for mergers after the AFL's announce ment that it preferred a 16-team competition including 10 from Melbourne. A NEW rule in the AFL's five-year plan relating to players revealing their financial details had broader issues that were yet to be fully understood, prominent Melbourne sports lawyer, Andrew Scott, said yesterday. Scott, of the law firm Moores and legal adviser to the AFL Players' Association, said the requirement for personal disclosures was not merely limited to a player's football activities. The AFL can look into the personal accounts of any of the players' associates, including his advisers, managers and even aunts and uncles, Scott said. They don't need it to be as far-reaching as that. He said nobody argued with the concept that salary cap rules had to be enforced by the AFL but said there were easier ways to police it.
  46. 1994-10-13 Article 118291216, score 10.198061 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People GRAHAM COOKE WAYNE STEPHENS,   ROB THOMSON,   MIKE FIGGA,   SCOTT STANDISH,   CHRIS DELUCIA,   STEPHEN ROSS,   LEONARD COLEMAN,   RICH ARENA,   FERNANDO ARANGO,   JOHN GALLOWAY,   JAMES HANRA,   KRAIG HAWKINS,   SCOTT ROMANO,   WAYNE STEPHENS
    Organisations GIANTS,   NATIONAL LEAGUE,   MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL,   ABL,   SOUTHERN CROSS WODEN,   US SUPREME COURT,   US MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL,   SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS,   TORONTO BLUE JAYS,   BASEBALL LEAGUE,   MAJOR LEAGUE,   MONARCHS,   SUPREME COURT
    Locations MELBOURNE,   CANBERRA,   PHILADELPHIA PHIL,   TAMPA BAY,   VICTORIA,   WODEN,   MEL BOURNE,   FLORIDA,   CALIFORNIA
    Misc WORLD SERIES,   VICTORIAN,   A-GRADE
    Southern Cross Woden's talent exodus leaves Stephens with shaky foundation ON THE PLATE wilft Graham Cooke Wayne Stephens believes in testing his personal limits. Chapter 1: He quits the then base ball backwater of Canberra to And out just how good he is as a player in the highly charged, competitive atmosphere of Melbourne. He measures himself, accepts he is not quite good enough for the Austra lian Baseball League, and returns to the ACT. Now, for Chapter 2. Stephens takes on the A-grade coaching of his alma mater, Southern Cross Woden. It is a hiding-to-nothing job, Woden having just won a premier ship and lost a number of top players. Surely, the only way is down? Maybe ... maybe not. At least sug gestions Woden would go from big win ners to easy beats in six months were not born out by its epic 16-inning struggle with talented Ainslie Bears on Sunday's opening day. At 30, Stephens is bringing a thoughtful, intelligent approach to coaching the club and - something of a rarity among Major League team bosses - he wants the job. I've done a bit of work with the 18s and with juniors in Melbourne, but in 12 years of playing seniors I've never coached a senior side, he said this week. I've played under some top coaches, such as John Galloway in Victoria, and learnt a lot from them, so I was quite eager to do the Woden job when I heard (last year's coach James Hanra han was leaving. We have lost a few players, but I believe we can fall back on our club spirit - that's honestly a major asset. There are young players coming through and they will get their chance this season, but also some of the older guys are still prepared to sit on the bench and wait for the moment when their particular skills are needed. That's a huge asset for a coach, it gives me flexibility. Not that Stephens is satisfied with the 6-5 opening-day loss. There were times when Ainslie had us beaten, then let us off, he said. They didn't seem to want the game enough. We made far too many errors, and the only thing you can say in defence is that it's early days and we'll get better with more match practice, but we'll certainly have to improve. His own form disappoints him. Like every player-coach, you spend time at training trying to help others then find you haven't any time to work on your own skills, he said. Stephens played three years in Mel bourne, coming desperately close to a place in the Monarchs' line-up in the first ABL season, eventually tearing knee ligaments while sliding into a base during a local club game. That was the end of my Victorian baseball, he said. I would have needed a reconstruction to continue playing at their level. Back in Canberra he works hard to strengthen the knee but it still bothers him. Inevitable reminders that no-one plays forever, but for Wayne Stephens the rewards of a successful coaching career are all in front of him. ? THE TORONTO Blue Jays will re main World Series champions for an other year, and the Philadelphia Phil lies will still be defending National League title-holders when strike-bound US Major League Baseball eventually resumes. The league presidents met to decide there will be no champions for 1994 be cause of the players' strike that started on August 12 and led to the cancella tion of the World Series for the first time in the history of the competition. Obviously the season was incom plete,n National League president Leonard Coleman said. Given the amount of the season that was left un played, the determination was that we will not have division champions. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court in Florida has ruled that Major League Baseball is not entirely exempt from anti-trust laws, a ruling the winning lawyers say could help resolve the strike. By a 5-1 decision, the court said that baseball's decades-long exemption from restraint-of-trade sanctions did not en tirely protect the league but only ap plied to a system that restricts the movement of players between teams. By doing so, the court ruled that owners of National League clubs must cooperate with the office of Florida's Attorney-General, which is investigating an unsuccessful effort to move the San Francisco Giants to Tampa Bay in 1992. The winning side hailed the court's ruling, which could have an impact on issues such as the salary cap, a major stumbling block to ending the strike that wrecked the 1994 season. This is a very exciting first step on the long road taking consumers over the lords of baseball, lawyer Stephen Ross said. He successfully represented consumers and sports fans in the case. The lawsuit was filed after a Florida investor group trying to lure the Giants from California was thwarted when Major League owners blocked the sale of the team to allow the Giants to find local investors. The case could go to the US Supreme Court on appeal. ? THE CANBERRA Bushrangers' American contingent began arriving yesterday. Back for a second stint is catcher Mike Figga and he was accom panied by pitcher Scott Standish and assistant coach Rich Arena. Arriving today is head coach Rob Thomson, trainer Chris Delucia and third baseman Scott Romano. The final player, speed merchant Kraig Hawkins, arrives next Wednesday. No date has been fixed for the arrival of the final member of the party, last year's assis tant coach Fernando Arango.
  47. 1994-03-20 Article 118159181, score 10.1201 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BEN HIRSCHLER,   JOHN BERRIMAN,   TREVOR JONES
    Organisations WELLCOME,   CENTOCOR,   CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY,   CELLTECH GROUP,   CHARING CROSS
    Locations LONDON,   ENGLAND,   BRITAIN,   UNITED STATES
    Misc JL A.,   BRITISH
    'Magic bullets' take their aim on disease POSSIBLE breakthrough in treating rheumatoid arthritis has JL A. revived interest in a class of drugs known as monoclonal antibodies, once touted as medicine's ultimate magic bullets . The idea of injecting patients with antibodies to fight specific diseases has long captivated scientists. In theory, the ability of these proteins - which form the ammunition of the body's immune system - to hunt and destroy foreign invaders should allow the development of drugs which hit the target and nothing else. But two decades after researchers at England's Cambridge University first found a way to make so-called mono clonal antibodies in the laboratory, just one drug to treat transplant organ re jection has.reached the market. Today, the main use of monoclonal antibodies is in diagnostic kits, includ ing home pregnancy tests. Slowly, however, antibodies' tarnished image is reviving. Several major pharmaceutical compa nies are investing heavily in the area, and there is growing confidence that significant products will make it to the market in the next couple of years. The latest boost came last month with clinical' evidence that antibody drugs may help fight rheumatoid arthri tis, a crippling disease caused by a breakdown in the immune system. Trials at London's Charing Cross ? Drug tests have raised new hope for sufferers of arthiritis. Ben Hirschler reports on progress on the eve of arthritis week. Hospital showed an impressive improve ment in 20 severe sufferers, lasting three to five months, following two weeks of treatment with CenTNF, an antibody drug made by the US firm Centocor. The drug works by mopping up tu mour necrosis factor (TNF), a natural ly-occurring chemical which plays a key role in triggering inflammation. Although CenTNF has yet to. prove itself in full-scale clinical trials, the re sults are encouraging. And for Centocor and other, compa nies with similar products in develop ment an immense market is beckoning. Sales of current anti-rheumatic drugs, which do 'not tackle the underlying causes of arthritis, are some SUS6 bil lion (SA8.3 billion) a year. Worldwide, pharmaceutical analysts . say there are some 70 monoclonal anti bodies in development for a range of diseases including cancer, arthritis, asth ma, septic shock and cardiovascular dis ease. Most will fall by the wayside, but some will have considerable potential, according to Trevor Jones, research and development director of British drug gi ant Wellcome. The hurdles are high, but if mono clonals get over them they could be tru ly enormous, he said. Problems remain - most notably the body's tendency to reject antibodies in serted through a syringe - but im proved techniques should make them more effective. Scientists can now use genetic engi neering to humanise original mouse derived antibodies, reducing the side ef fects they cause. Some companies are even starting to produce 100 per cent human antibodies in the laboratory. . This second generation of mono clonals should be more specific and have less potential for rejection, Jones said. Many stock market investors who piled into biotechnology shares in the 1980s are wary of monoclonals after getting their .fingers burnt in 1992 when two drugs failed to get regulatory ap proval in the United States. But despite the.stock market gloom, . major drug companies have stuck with the technology. John Berriman, commercial director at Britain's Celltech Group, whose bio logic division is a world leader in anti body manufacture, says drug majors are actually stepping up their involvement, despite the setbacks of 1992. Those upsets chiefly influenced in vestors, who definitely concluded that antibodies were bad news. The'drug in dustry has had a much more measured response, he said. He predicted four or five antibody drugs could be on the market in the next five years. The key to the sector's success, how ever, will be in proving that expensive antibody drugs given by injection offer a cost-effective alternative to conven tional pills. , . The issue is highlighted by the case of rheumatoid arthritis, stock analysts said. Antibody treatment could cost the equivalent of SA6,920 to A 13,845 per patient per year, while many existing arthritis drugs are cheap non-steroidal anti-inflammatories: including aspirin. - Router '.'IL
  48. 1994-12-20 Article 127261611, score 10.105334 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN FAULKNER,   PAUL CHAMBERLIN,   PETER CLEE,   ROBYN LOYDELL,   BARRY CUNNINGHAM,   DAVID BEDDALL,   HARRY WOODS,   MC MILLAN
    Organisations FOREST PROTECTION SOCIETY,   LABOR,   NSW FOREST PRODUCTS ASSOCIA,   FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,   COALITION,   PARLIAMENT HOUSE
    Locations SYDNEY AIRPORT,   WESTERN AUSTRALIA,   TASMANIA,   VICTO,   VICTORIA
    Misc ENVIRON
    Loggers ready to blockade Woodchip warning to Govt By PAUL CHAMBERLIN The logging industry has promised a reprise of the huge 1990 blockade of Can berra in the new year if the Federal Government makes major concessions this week to green groups on wood chip licences. One industry leader warned yesterday that unless the Minis ter for Resources, David Beddall, stands firm against the demands of colleagues and environmental ists, the industry and 80,000 peo ple it employs will be ruined and we'll take a few Labor poli ticians out with us . Meanwhile, pro-industry ministers have identified seven seats in rural areas reliant on timber products which they be lieve could fall to the Coalition in the event of a voter backlash. They plan to use this in the case of a Cabinet stoush. Five of the seven would need a swing of less than 1 per cent to unseat the sitting ALP mem ber. The seats include two in Tasmania (Bass and Lyons), three in NSW (Page, Paterson and Gilmore) and two in Victo ria (McEwen and McMillan). Another three are seen as po tentially dangerous, and if all were to fall then the ALP would most likely lose the next elec tion. Government sources said the ministers found gains for the ALP by slowing or stopping wpodchipping, but these would be in city se3ts they already hold. The forests' industry actively campaigned against the Member for Page, Harry Woods, at the last election and his margin slipped to 0.1 per cent. The Member for McEwen, Peter Clee land, and the Member for Mc Millan, Barry Cunningham, lost their seats in 1990 because of similar campaigns, but won them back last year. The Minister for the Environ ment, John Faulkner, has pro vided advice from his depart ment and various environmental agencies to Mr Beddall, calling on him to preserve about 1300 forest coupes from logging be cause they contain old growth or wilderness areas, or endan gered species and habitat. To do this, Mr Beddall would have to reduce quotas to compa nies in four states that are ask ing for renewals or expansions to their export woodchip li cences in 1995. But so far he has shown signs that, if anything, he wants quotas increased. If Senator Faulkner objects to Mr Beddall's decision, he may be able to force the issue to Cab inet. A number of green groups, us ing 120,000 in federal funding, identified 764 forest areas this year which they argue should be exempt; from Jpgging in 1995. These areas are different in size to the 1300 coupes in Sen gfpr Faulkner's adyice. It is understood government agencies rejected some forests identified by the groups in Victoria, Tas mania and Western Australia as not being of high conservation value, but added some others in NSW to the list because of en dangered species. Accepting Senator Faulkner's advice in full would destroy the industry and throw 25,000 people out of work in NSW, according to the executive director of the NSW Forest Products Associa tion, Col Dorber. If this is carried out, we'll' make the Sydney Airport block ade look like small beer, he said, referring to the 1990 block ade of Parliament House by hun dreds of logging trucks. It's not hard for us to do that, it's a pretty easy thing to bring a city to a halt. If Can berra wants to spend a couple of weeks in total isolation, I'm sure I could get enough people inter ested in the idea. Mr Dorber accused Senator Faulkner of being a totally cyn ical politician operating in a portfolio without any attempt to address whole-of-government is sues . If the industry goes, we'll take a few Labor politicians out with us, he said. In a letter to Mr Beddall yes terday, Mr Dorber said an as sessment of forests in NSW's north-east by a conservation group sought an end to logging in 328 coupes and more limited protection for another 776. If ap plied, it would bring all native forest logging to an end, he said, as only residue in this region was exported for woodchips. The national director of the Forest Protection Society, Robyn Loydell, said she also feared bad nevys when Mr Beddall made his announcement. All I've heard is that it won't be a win for industry or for the greens, she said. That leaves open where they will stop wood chipping, with no thought of the social or economic consequences involved in such a move.
  49. 1994-11-30 Article 130540980, score 10.001623 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN MARSDEN,   ALEXANDER DOWNER,   IAN HENDERSON
    Organisations FEDER AL LABOR
    Locations AUSTRALIA
    Misc NOVEMBER-JANU,   AUSTRALIAN
    Small business confidence slips back a notch By IAN HENDERSON, Economics Writer Small business confi dence about its prospects during the next 12 months remains high but has mod erated recently, according to results of a private sec tor survey published yester day. Nationally, 73 per cent of businesses expressed over all confidence and 14 per cent expressed some wor ries in the Yellow Pages November survey, leaving a net positive balance of.-'89 per cent. In previous sur veys this, year, the net bal ance was 75 per cent posi tive. A special survey of ACT small businesses showed a net 51 per cent confident about their prospects over the coming year. More ACT firms reported a fall than a rise in profit ability and investment in the past three months, but a majority looked forward to a significant turnaround in the next months. They also expected increases in total sales, the size of their' workforces and their wages bills in the November-Janu ary period compared with August-October. The national survey re sults show that a net two thirds of firms expect to in crease sales, one-third to in crease employment, and more than 60 per cent to enjoy higher profitability over the next 12 months. Nationally, the peaking of housing demand, interest rate rises and the effects of the drought have taken the edge off small business con fidence, sales and employ ment growth, according to Dr John Marsden, the eco nomics adviser for the small business index. About one-third of propri etors said they were not facing any significant busi ness problems. Others named lack of sales or work and cash now as the major concerns. Only 4 per cent listed federal government regulations and 3 per cent state government regulations as concerns. For the ACT, the survey report highlighted the slightly weaker confidence about small business pro spects than elsewhere and the relatively weak sales, profitability and capital ex penditure growth in the three months to October. Federal Opposition Lead er Alexander Downer said yesterday that only the pri vate sector could create wealth and jobs. Govern ment spending would not solve Australia's economic problems, he said. Mr Downer called for economic changes to pro vide for sustainable growth. These must include indus trial relations reform, to take away the special place enjoyed by trade union bosses and to provide for a legal freedom for all em ployees to join or not to join a trade union, he said. Deals between the trade union bosses and the Feder al Labor Government ... . have been fine by the trade union movement but have damaged the fabric of the Australian economy, he said. Mr Downer said the taxa tion system needed to be changed to make Australia more attractive to investors and to business, with changes to the capital gains tax for small businesses and to the fringe benefits tax. He said there needed to be a real commitment to the industries that really make Australia work, which included not just sunrise industries but. also the tourism and resource industries. The small business sur vey results showed that be tween the August and No vember surveys the confidence level in the building and construction sector declined significant ly, and to a lesser extent in the business services and transport and storage in dustries. In the personal services sector, confidence rose significantly from one survey to the next.
  50. 1994-05-25 Article 118213735, score 10.000795 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People TONY STALEY,   MALCOLM FRASER,   ASHLEY GOLDSWORTHY,   JOHN HEWSON,   ALEXANDER DOWNER,   RON WALKER,   PETER REITH,   JEFF KENNETT,   GILLIAN JONES,   PETER COSTELLO,   PETER JONES
    Organisations LIB ERAL PARTY,   MELBOURNE CLUB,   LIBERAL PARTY
    Locations MELBOURNE GUB
    Misc VICTORIAN PRE,   WESTERN AUS
    Senior Libs consulted on Hewson's fall By JACK WATERFORD The four most senior officers of the organisational wing of the Lib eral Party were involved in Satur day's intervention against then Liberal Party leader John Hewson by the party's federal president, Tony Staley. Mr Staley is understood to have consulted the federal treasurer of the party, Ron Walker, and the female vice-president, Gillian Jones, and discussed with them his intention to issue a statement that Dr Hewson was incapable of leading the party to victory at the next election and that the party needed a change of leadership. Continued on Page 2 Senior Liberals consulted on Hewson's fall Continued from Page 1 They are believed to have agreed to his doing so. The male vice-president of the party, Peter Jones, of Western Aus tralia, was overseas and was not contacted before the statement. But Mr Staley was confident at the time that he also would have agreed; when he was able to make contact after the event, Mr Jones is said to have endorsed what he had done. After Mr Staley rang Dr Hewson on Saturday morning to tell him of his intention to issue a statement, it is understood that the Hewson camp made frantic efforts to get state presidents or other major offi cials of the party to support Dr Hewson to defuse the force of the Staley hand-grenade. It could not get any to do so. Not all agreed with Mr Staley's decision to intervene, but none were willing to put out a statement in support of the Hewson leadership one rea son, perhaps, being that they agreed with Dr Hewson that the organisa tional wing should not involve it self in parliamentary leadership issues. Later, three party officials did something to distance themselves from the Staley role. A former party president, Ashley Goldsworthy, the president of the Young Liberals and the chairman of the women's sec tion of the party expressed concern at what Mr Staley had done. The generally united front against Dr Hewson from the party's organisational wing, however, pro vides very little evidence of a plot by them. While many of the officials had long been tracking grassroots de spondency about the party's pro spects under Dr Hewson, and shared it, and also had polling evi dence of the federal party's failure to make headway, there is little evi dence of a lead-up destabilisation campaign, involving the organisa tion or not, or any role by the party machinery in organising any coup, or in the timing of the events which precipitated the spill and the subse quent challenge. The only piece of evidence was the leaking, by sources unknown, of internal party polling material dam aging to Dr Hewson, but this oc curred after he had already been placed under pressure by his own actions. The key event which brought simmering tensions to the boil had been Dr Hewson's mis handling of comments by his for mer deputy, Peter Reith. Later Malcolm Fraser attacked Hewson's leadership, and the Victorian Pre mier, Jeff Kennett, attacked Peter Costello as undermining Dr Hew son (in the process undermining Dr Hewson's claim that leadership speculation was a media beat-up), but the initiative of a party spill had been with Dr Hewson, at a time when no challenge was being pre pared. The spill, in fact, caught by surprise some who had considered they would stand if Dr Hewson stood down: Mr Downer, for ex ample, had said he would not stand. Mr Staley said yesterday that his celebrated Melbourne Club meet ing on Thursday with Alexander Downer, the new party leader, did not in any way involve any coup planning or a push against Dr Hew son. Nor did it signal a change of allegiance. He had always had regular meet ings with senior parliamentarians at which he had sought to keep him self informed about what was going on in the party, he said. He had said nothing at the Melbourne Gub, or at any meetings he had ever held with Mr Downer, involving any move against Dr Hewson, he said. Asked yesterday to comment on parallels with the 1980s interven tions, Mr Staley said his role had been different. In speaking out he had been reflecting a deepening despair from all levels of the organisation. In the course of hundreds of meetings with members, at branches, and with party officials, there had been great frustration about the state of the party, increasing gloom about whether things could change with Dr Hewson and some anger that loyalties within the organisation had been strained to breaking point
  51. 1994-09-26 Article 118140253, score 9.992568 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JEAN-BCRTRAND ARISTIDE,   BILL CLINTON,   JOHN SHALIKASBVILI,   GENER AL RAOUL CEDRAS,   WILLIAM PERRY,   JEAN-CLAUDE DUVALIER,   STAN LEY SCHRAGER
    Organisations US ARMY,   DEFENCE
    Locations CUBA,   HAITI,   CAP HAI TIEN,   GUANTANAMO,   JACMEL,   UNITED STATES,   PORT-AU-PRINCE
    Misc HAITIAN,   CHINOOK,   PRO-ARISTIDE,   HAITIANS,   AMERICAN
    Support swells for Aristide PORT-AU-PRINCE, Sunday: Hundreds of Haitians chanted support for exiled president Jean-Bcrtrand Aristide as the US Defence Secretary and his top general arrived yesterday to review efforts to restore democ racy. Defence chicf William Perry and General John Shalikasbvili, chair man of the joint chicfs of staff, flew in to review more than 10,000 American troops, but will not meet Haiti's outgoing military junta, of ficials said. US military forces are here as friends and not as invaders, Mr Perry said. Their arrival coincided with a demonstration by hundreds of Hai tians converging on the port area and chanting slogans in favour of Mr Aristide, due to be restored to power three years after he was ousted by a military coup. The demonstrators waved leafy branches, a symbol of renewal and the trademark of the democratic movements that swept Haiti after the fall in 1986. of former presid ent-for-life Jean-Claude Duvalier. The protest was the first major test of the Haitian police and mili tary since an incident last week when a man was beaten to death by police dispersing pro-Aristide demonstrators. US forces, which stood by dur AP picture Young Haitian boys look up to a US Army soldier on a foot patrol in their neighbourhood of Port-au-Prince. ing the beatings, have been given new orders allowing them to inter vene to stop abuses by the Haitian security forces. Mr Perry and General Shali-, kashvili would visit US troops tak ing part in Operation Uphold De mocracy in the capital and the northern coastal city of Cap Hai tien, US embassy spokesman Stan ley Schrager said. He said they would not meet army chief Gener al Raoul Cedras, who agreed to step down by October 15 under an llth-hour agreement that averted a US invasion and allowed US troops to land unopposed. US troops continued moving out beyond the capital, extending to key provincial towns. The US con tingent in Haiti is expected to soon reach its full strength of between 14,000 and 15,000. About 100 troops with an air borne special forces unit took con trol of the airport in Jacmel in south-eastern Hai'ti. arriving aboard Chinook helicopters to the cheers of about 2000 Haitians. It has not been determined how long we will be here. a US officer said in Jacmel. We are here to observe and help stabilise and se cure the region as well as to assist and professionalise local Haitian forces. The US military has tried to dis tance itself from its Haitian counterparts, but Haitian military officials have sought to portray themselves as working closely with US troops. In his. radio address yesterday, US President Bill Clinton indicated that the 14,000 Haitian boatpeople being housed at the US naval base in Guantanamo, Cuba, would be gin leaving soon. Perhaps the best evidence of our success is that two to three hundred Haitian refugees who we have sheltered in our base in Guantanamo will go home on Monday. he said. - AFP I
  52. 1994-02-06 Article 134300034, score 9.914354 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MESSRS MENZIES,   JOHN HEWSON,   ROS KELLY,   HEWSON BILL MANDLE,   MARGARET THATCHER,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN DAWKINS
    Locations ENGLAND,   AUSTRALIA
    Misc AMERICAN,   AUSTRALIAN
    Political speaking eludes Hewson BILL MANDLE I WAS out of the country for last year's federal election campaign. The result was one I both feared and expected. But I was surprised that John Hewson chose to stand for re-election as leader, even more surprised that a majority of his colleagues supported him. From the scanty reports I saw in England it was obvious that Dr Hewson was out ampaigned. The goods and services tax could have been sold by a competent political fighter. It was not the GST that sank Dr Hewson; it was his own political incapacity. Why this should be so is, on the surface, a puzzle. Dr Hewson has much going for him. In fact, the tougher the content or the words, the greater seems the contrast with the impediment. Recourse to elocution lessons is not unknown among politicians Margaret Thatcher, John Major and, I'd guess, Ros Kelly are examples; and it is possible, as Messrs Menzies and Whitlam showed, to cultivate a vocal gravitas for public performance. Whether the particular difficulty that Dr Hewson has is susceptible to treatment I am not expert enough to say; but it was obvious from very early in his political career that the problem was a factor, and a wise minder might have taken the matter in hand. A politician deals in words, and if every time he opens his mouth questions arise in the minds of his listeners not only about what is being said, but how it is being said, there is trouble in store. So much for the outward and audible signs. What of the inner man? There is intelligence there, enhanced and polished by education. It is unfashionably elitist to say so; but even an Australian university education bestows some advantages: and remember that Dr Hewson went through our university system before John Dawkins's deconstruction wrought its havoc with standards, now, I see, in further decline as entrance scores are lowered to meet yet another political objective. And Dr Hewson went to a good American university as well. He knows what he is talking about, whereas Paul Keating often gives the impression that it is only the person who briefed him who knows. Dr Hewson pronounces words correctly; and knows what they mean. So far, so good. What of content? The GST was a perfectly respectable policy. It relied upon the paradox that a consumption tax would increase consumption, and thereby increase growth. Tax would not be deducted at source, but garnered as people chose when and where to spend their own money. It was a fairer, more traditionally capitalist exercise than socialist welfare state redistributionism. But it was rejected. Not only because Dr Hewson could not sell it cold; but because he could not sell it in the heat of political battle. Dr Hewson is an expositor, a lecturer, a conference-paper presenter. The performance occurs in protected surroundings. No one heckles the professor. The 300-a-day (morningand afternoon-teas and lunch provided, Conference dinner extra) conference attender is lulled by the slides, the podium lighting, the label on his lapel, and the glossy, logoed, ring-binder into acquiescence. Dr Hewson delivers, often without visible notes, and certainly without sheaf of script, excellent talks, lectures, sermons. But political speaking is different. When Dr Hewson ventures into political territory for his homilies, the trumpet gives forth an uncertain sound. The mannerisms of voice and gesture, the tilt of body, the sweep of arm are geared to lectern or pulpit, not to the prize ring. Dr Hewson's jabs of the forefinger fall faintly downwards: Mr Keating's are steel rods. Dr Hewson's, affected, vituperation comes from the roof of his mouth: Mr Keating's fullthroated from the guts. There is, in political as in all other animals, such a thing as being overbred. Neither Mr Keating nor Dr Hewson would lay claim to having been born to Australia's purple. Both emphasise their humble origins; but there is also such a thing as being overtrained. Dr Hewson's education has enabled him to see that there is more than one side to any question. Tertiary education lays great stress upon that. Even a scientific education demonstrates that experimentation is in essence the testing of alternatives. Dr Hewson lacks the blessed certainty and the comforting conviction of the ignorant. He tries reason when the only thing to do with a bully like Mr Keating is to punch him in the nose and call him a whilst doing it. Political debate, and political leadership, has its own rules of speech and conduct. People sensed from the start that Dr Hewson was a different sort of politician. He encouraged such thoughts. What was intended to be a strength has become a weakness as its inappropriateness to the struggle has become apparent. It may be a pity that it is so; but political victory is won by those with strong political minds. Menzies, Fraser, Hawke had such a mind: Whitlam did not hence his quick political demise. It is not, in other contexts, a nice mind to have, or to want to cultivate. But if you don't have it, or are unwilling to go into training to get it, it is hardly worth going on.
  53. 1994-10-30 Article 118294764, score 9.910172 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People IAN ROB,   ROD WIS HART,   STEVE RENOUF,   SCOTT GIBBS,   ALLAN BA,   BOB FULTON,   CLIVE GRIFFITHS,   JACK ROBINSON,   GERALD CORDIE,   DAVID YOUNG,   BRAD FITTLER,   PAUL SIRONEN,   STEVE WALTERS,   JOHN DEVEREUX,   GREG FLORIMO,   BRETT MULLINS,   ROWLAND PHILLIPS,   DAIO POWELL,   DAVID FAIRLEIGH,   PAUL MOR,   ADRIAN HADLEY,   KEVIN ELLIS,   JONATHAN GRIFFITHS,   KEVIN WALTERS,   PAUL HARRAGON,   STEVE MEN ZLES,   ALLAN BATEMAN,   JONATHAN DAVIES,   IAN MARLOW,   DAVID FURNER,   TONY SULLIVAN,   PHIL MORIARTY,   LESTYN HARRIS,   BRONCO WENDELL SAILOR,   WENDELL SAIL,   MARK PERRETT,   DAVID FUMER,   MAI MENINGA,   PHIL FORD,   SCOTT QUINNELL,   ALLAN LANGER,   ROD WLSHART,   RICHARD WEBSTER,   GLENN LAZARUS
    Organisations WARRINGTON,   WIDNES,   WIGAN,   SALFORD,   LLANELLI,   SHEFFIELD EAGLES,   ST HELENS
    Locations WALES,   SALLORD,   CARDIFF,   CANBERRA,   GREAT BRITAIN,   NINIAN PARK,   AUSTRALIA,   NORTH SYDNEY,   FULTON,   HALIFAX,   BRADFORD NORTHERN,   WAKEFIELD,   BRADFORD,   BEVAN HANNAN CARDIFF
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   ENGLISH RUGBY FOOTBALL LEAGUE,   BRIS,   WELSH,   AUSTRALIAN
    Roos not treating Welsh lightly From BEVAN HANNAN CARDIFF, ? Saturday: Wales faces the litmus test of its international rugby league revival when it tack les Australia at Ninian Park, Cardiff, tomorrow morning. In the fourth year of its re building program after seven years in the wildernesst the Welsh Dragon has performed credibly despite a glaring lack of depth. English Rugby Football League administrators rate the develop ment of the game in Wales as an important cog in the future of Great Britain rugby league. The international billing against the Kangaroos is due rec ognition of the work they have put in. Australian coach Bob Fulton initially rated the Wales fixture as one of the toughest on the Kangaroos itinerary, the three Ashes Tests and the unofficial fourth Test against World Club Champions Wigan the . only hard er assignments. But the magnitude of the Wales task was highlighted by the Kan garoos' stinging rebound from their loss in the first Test. They pummeled Sheffield Eagles 80-2 mid-week. Test jumpers are now on the line for Australia and the Wales game is the last chance for play ers to make an impression on Fulton. Goal-kicking winger Rod Wis hart has the pressure on Bris bane Bronco Wendell Sailor to hold down his Test position. Prop Glenn Lazarus, although still below full fitness, is still the best momentum-gathering prop in the game on his day and is looking to boost his claims. Experienced back-rower Paul Sironen was also below his best in the first Test and must show greater involvement against Wales, especially if Canberra's David Furner and North Sydney's David Fairleigh continue their good form. Welsh coach Clive Griffiths named a 20-man squad although was awaiting to assess the injury progress of several key players before finalising his run-on team. The major concern is Great Britain star Jonathan Davies, who injured his shoulder in the first Test win but is desperate to show his Welsh pride by wearing the red jumper against the Aus tralians. Great Britain and Warrington team-mate Allan Bateman is also on the recovery trail and their absence would be a huge blow to Welsh morale. The Welsh squad contains 17 rugby union converts. Halifax lock Mark Perrett, Warrington back Lestyn Harris and Bradford Northern's Daio Powell are the only players brought up on league. Griffiths caused a stir by call ing gun former Welsh rugby union star Scott Quinnell into the squad this week. Quinnell trans ferred to Wigan last month in a mega-deal and has only played two lower grade games. Wigan boss Jack Robinson didn't want to see Quinnell pitched into such a match al though' if injuries go against the Welsh, Griffiths has no choice but to name the former Llanelli star on the reserves bench. Former Manly-Warringah cen tre John Devereux, despite play ing little football this season due to a fall-out with club Widnes, stands as a main thrust while ex Great Britain forward Paul Mor iarty and recent St Helens rugby union signing Scott Gibbs are al so class acts. Australia and Wales have met on nine other occasions, the Kan garoos having a perfect record in cluding a 37-7 victory in their last international in 1982. AUSTRALIA: Brett Mullins, Wendell Sail or, Mai Meninga (e), Steve Renouf, Rod Wlshart, Kevin Walters, Allan langer, Brad Fittler, David Fumer, Paul Sironen, Ian Rob erts, Steve Walters, Glenn Lazarus. Res: Greg Florimo, David Fairleigh, Steve Men zles, Paul Harragon. WALES: Phil Ford (SaUord) or .Lestyn Harris (Warrington), Tony Sullivan (St Helens), Scott Gibbs (St Helens), Allan Ba teman (Warrington) or John Devereux (Widnes), Adrian Hadley (Widnes) or Dever eux, Jonathan Davies (Warrington) or Har ris, Kevin Ellis (Warrington), David Young (Sallord), Jonathan Griffiths (St Helens), Ian Marlow (Wakefield), Rowland Phillips (War rington), Phil Moriarty (Halifax), Mark Perrett (Halifax). Res: Richard Webster (Salford), Gerald Cordie (Bradford), Daio Powell (Bradford) or Scott Quinnell (Wigan).
  54. 1994-12-01 Article 127257592, score 9.797731 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People RENE RIVKIN,   TINA ARNDT,   MICHAEL YIANNAKIS,   JOHN MACTAGGART,   RUPERT MURDOCH,   KERRY PACKER,   WINSTON SAMMUT,   GARY SCHAFER,   PHILLIP ADAMS,   JOHN KERIN,   BRUCE STAN DEN,   TOM CONNORS,   IAN HENDERSON
    Organisations BRISBANE BULLETS,   RESOURCE ECONOMICS,   BRISBANE BRONCOS,   PREMIER LEAGUE,   MACKS,   NEWS CORP,   STAR TV,   BARCLAYS AUSTRALIA,   NEWS CORP LTD,   AMLC,   TELECOM,   FOX BROADCASTING,   BSKYB,   AM BREAKFAST CLUB,   CATTLE COUNCIL OF AUSTRA LIA,   LIVESTOCK CORPORATION,   ABARE,   NORTHERN RIVERS LTD
    Locations NEW SOUTH WALES,   CANBERRA,   QUEENSLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   ASIA,   AUSTRA,   NEW YORK,   BRISBANE,   UNITED STATES,   JAPAN,   MACKSVILLE,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc AUSSIE,   ALL ORDINARIES,   PREMIER LEAGUE,   ISO,   ENGLISH,   AMERICAN,   JAPANESE,   OPTUS VISION CONSOR TIUM,   AUSTRALIAN
    Market Forces A WEEKLY COMMENTARY ON BUSINESS, INVESTMENT AND THE ECONOMY Employment growth now about 3.5pc a year IAN HENDERSON looks at interesting details behind the latest figures on jobs for men and women. Employment growth is now running at about 3.5 per cent per annum. That's the overall figure calculated by comparing the to-' tal number of employed persons in one month this year with the number em ployed a year ago It represents about 270,000 new jobs? each year. Because the rate of growth has been accelerating recently, this ( means 25,000 to 30,000 new jobs, each' month. Behind these figures is some interst ing detail about who is'gaining. Two disaggregations are immediate ly available:-the splits between jobs growth for men and for women, and between full-time and; part-time em ployment. First things first. Women's employ ment is now rising at about 4 per cent per annum and men's at about 3 per cent. Put another way, whereas a year ago women held about 42.5 per cent of all jobs, they are getting approximate ly 48.5 per cent of the growth at pres ent. / Conversely, of course, men's share 'of new jobs is about 51.5 per cent com pared with'the base of 57.5 per cent of total employment a year ago. Second, part-time is faster than full-time growth although. the rate of increase for the former is slowing, for the latter accelerating. In recent months on average, part-time jobs rose by about 5.5 per cent annually; for full-time jobs, the annual rise was about 3 per cent. . A year ago part-time jobs accounted for about 23.5-24 per cent of-the total, down from the 1991-92 and 1992-93 averages of 26.4 per cent and 29.2 per cent respectively, although still up from earlier years. Part-time jobs' share of the total growth was around 35.4 per cent in October, less than in previous months but above its share of total jobs. In real jobs numbers: over the year to October, total jobs for men in creased by about 138,000 and for wom en 131,000; the total number of part-time jobs increased by 95,000 and full-time jobs by 174,000. The figures vary a little from month to month, but these results are typical and are based on trend data to minimise the chances of mistaking random error for a major discovery! The next obvious step is to examine the further disaggregation into male full-time and part-time and female full-time and part-time jobs. In summary: full-time jobs for men are growing at about 2.5 per cent per annum and for women at about 4 per cent; part-time jobs for men are accel erating and are growing at almost 9 per cent a year; for women, part-time jobs are slowing with a growth of ap proximately 4 per ccnt. Part-time employment for men has recently accounted for around 6 per cent of the total number of jobs. But growth in that share of employment is running at 2'A times that figure. The comparable figures for womens' part-time work has been a 17.7 per cent share of the total but a higher although declining proportion of to tal jobs growth, at 20.3 per cent in the year, to October; To more or less complete that pic ture, full-time employment for men ac counted for about 51.7 per cent of the total a year ago. Now, its share of jobs growth is much less,, around 36.3 per cent in the year, to October. It is again sensible to put some real jobs numbers to these proportions. Full-time jobs growth for men is running at around 100,000 a year, part-time growth at 40,000. For women, full-time jobs are growing at about 75,000 annually, and part-time jobs at 55,000. So, who's gaining out of the boost in employment during the economic re covery? The answer is men and worn on, part-time and full-time. Who's do ing best depends on whether the ques tion is about rates of growth or abso lute numbers of jobs or this recovery compared with the stock of jobs. If it is about growth rates, the an swer is clearly part-time male work ers. If it is about absolute numbers, the answer is full-time males. If it is a comparison with the past, it iswomen who are gaining most. Also interesting is that the propor tion of part-time workers whether men or women who are satisfied with the number of hours they are working has increased in the past year. And for women part-time work ers although not so clearly for men part-time workers the average num ber of hours worked has increased. Perhaps a significant part of the re covery in employment has been taken up so far with those part-time workers interested in more work actually work ing additional hours, even becoming full-time workers, leaving a higher percentage of other part-time workers being those satisfied with the hours they have been working. The jobs growth figures are large, and welcome. With around 800,000 peo ple still unemployed, there is a long way to go to cut the jobless queue and there is a continuing large need for furthfer jobs growth. With the labour force growing at about 1.5-2 per cent a year, only about 10,000 jobs are available to cut the numbers of the unemployed each month after new additions to the la bour force of 15,000 to 20,000 are taken care of. There is, as they say, more work to be done. Picture: GARY SCHAFER Which way for beef? Australian farmers are to become involved in a new quality assurance program. Countering scare EEF contamination scares always send shock waves through the Australian beef industry because of the po tential damage they can do to the our reputation as a supplier of clean meat to the world market. In the long chain from the pad dock to plate there are many things that can go wrong and put a 3 bil lion export trade in beef at risk. No-one wants to take the blame for the cotton trash affair, not the state agricultural authorities who approve the use of chemicals on crops, the cotton growers who sprayed chlorflu azuron (CFZ) to control caterpillars and then sold their trash to beef pro ducers, or the beef producers who fed it.. No-one was aware that this new product-developed in Japan and sold under the brand name, Helix, would contaminate beef and lead to the frightening events of the past couple of weeks with Australia's major beef importers all stopping distribution to shops, supermarkets and processors. Routine testing for chemical resi due at the Midco abattoirs at Macks ville on the NSW north coast found samples of beef containing CFZ above the allowable limit of one part per million. Despite the fact that' the chemical is considered harmless, unless infect- . ed beef is digested in massive quanti ties and Japanese fanners spray it on fruit and vegetables, the discov ery at Macksville was a blow the beef industry could have done with out. Many beef producers are suffering badly from the drought and, ironical ly, because of the drought, some beef producers located near cotton areas of northern NSW and Queensland From the paddock to the plate there are many things that can go wrong in the beef trade, says TOM CONNORS. found themselves even keener to buy cotton trash to add roughage and fi bre to their stock feeds. While other feeds were in short supply , and very expensive, cotton trash was available and relatively cheap. Unfortunately, last year cotton growers began to spray Helix. It is hard to blame them because it is regarded as so effective in the con trol of caterpillars that it can actual ly reduce the overall usage of chemi cals in an industry that has been criticised for its heavy use of them. While it can be argued that in the case of Helix, one part per million, contamination is a ridiculously low ratio, beef growers surely have the right to ask why the cotton industry was allowed to use it, in pellet form, before any tests were made. Someone must take responsibility and ensure that when a new chemi cal comes on to the market that tests extend far beyond what it does for the crop but what impact it might have on other primary industries. Livestock are fed a variety of feeds, especially in dr times and, apart from cotton trash, they include sugar cane tops, peanut shells, cotton meal and molasses. Chemicals sprayed on feed can end up in beef which can also be contam inated when cattle graze on land that was previously used for cropping. The markets are opening up again .with overseas countries accepting that Australia has proper testing pro cedures in place and that the feeding of thrash has been banned. However, a significant amount of damage has been done to Australia's reputation as a supplier of clean beef and its competitors have been given a free kick. Soon after Japan stopped the dis tribution of Australian beef imports from the United States rose in price by 10 to 15 per cent. As the cotton trash contamination news broke, Australia was winding down a major promotion campaign in Japan for Aussie beef. The Aussie beef banners have been displayed at the meat counters of Japanese supermarkets and the theme has been that Australia pro vided only beef that was clean and wholesome. The Japanese consumers are very sensitive to contamination scares and, according to the managing di rector of the Australian Meat and Livestock Corporation, Bruce Stan den, there has been a backlash in that country with a fair way to go in restoring Australia's reputation. Dr Standen said the AMLC was conducting an extensive consumer survey in Japan and when the re sults were known next month they would be a guide for the type of me dia campaign that should be run to restore Australia's image. The AMLC chairman and former Minister for Primary Industry, John Kerin, will lead a mission to Japan next week to help restore the confi dence of the Japanese meat trade and the consumer in the wholesome ness of Australian beef. The concern about Japan is obvi ous. According to the Australian Bu reau of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian beef exports to Japan rose by almost 20 per cent in 1993-94 to displace the US as Aus tralia's largest market for the first time. ABARE has forecast that Japanese demand will rise further as its econ omy recovers from recession, al though demand for Australian beef may be moderated by the availability of lower priced US beef'. Australia sends frozen lean beef to the US for the hamburger and soft goods market and it has no direct re tail identification. It is different in Japan where our growth market is in chilled, quality meat for retail sale. Because of this the cotton trash incidence was so alarming. In Canberra this week the presid ent of the Cattle Council of Austra lia, John Mactaggart, took steps to prevent a re-occurrence of the CFZ situation. He launched a quality assurance program under which every produc er will record all inputs and farm ac tivities to ensure the beef they sell reaches international standards of wholesomeness. This will be the first time that such a scheme, geared to an interna tional standard known as ISO 9002 will be put into operation at the farm level. Already pilot groups of farmers have been set up in several states and eventually all farmers will get involved in quality control. The pen alty for not joining in will be non-ac ceptance of their cattle by meat pro cessors. Murdoch hungers for sport By MICHAEL YIANNAKIS UNTIL a few years ago, News Corp Ltd chairman and chief executive Rupert Murdoch had not shown any particular inter est in sport.' But recently the media magnate has developed a hunger for the rights to broadcast a range of sports from American football, English soc cer, Australian rugby league and world golf in an attempt to boost his world-ide television interest. Mr Murdoch's current investments into pay television and his Fox net work in the United States amount to billions of dollars, including televi sion rights for major sports which are seen as crucial to attracting au diences and advertising revenues. Analysts say his recent foray into Australian sport demonstrates his aim to sustain and expand his media empire, as well as help kick off his local pay TV venture. Mr Murdoch has signalled his in tention to drastically change the na ture of the top rating rugby league competition with a proposal to estab lish a super league teams. That was put on hold as clubs vowed allegiance to the current com petition, Kerry Packer signalled he would hold on to the broadcasting rights until the year 2000, and the Federal Government moved to en sure the sport would be available on free-to-air TV. Mr Murdoch announced last month he was joining Telecom in a 3.5 billion venture to deliver cable pay TV to Australia in direct compe tition to the Optus Vision consor tium, which includes Mr Packer. News Corp is eager for a deal to broadcast sport through its Austra lian venture with Telecom or its other TV interests in the US through Fox Broadcasting, in Britain. with BSkyB or in Asia with STAR TV. Barclays Australia Investment Ser vices domestic equities manager Winston Sammut said a key to the success of the jointly owned BSkyB was its delivery of Premier League, soccer matches. BSkyB's sports channel is the main reason for attracting subscrib ers, apart from movies, he said. If you can control sport world-wide, then you're in a position to deter mine who is going to access that sport You also have a great competi tive edge on everybody else. Mr Murdoch outbid the establish ment to capture the Premier League soccer for BSkyB by paying 304 mil lion ( A631 million) in 1992 for exclu sive coverage of top UK soccer clubs for five years. Mr Murdoch has also turned his attention to the establishment of a rebel golf tournament, featuring the top 30 players in the world. This will be televised by Fox Broadcasting, which last year paid SUS1.58 billion ( A2.1 billion) for the rights to broad cast US football and also holds ice hockey television rights. Closer to home, Northern Rivers Ltd, which is 12 per cent owned by News Corp and holds a stake in the Brisbane Broncos rugby league fran chise, recently signed a deal to take a 50 per cent interest in the Brisbane Bullets basketball team, leaving open the possibility of a national basket ball competition for pay TV. - aap All's well with our world By RENE RIVKIN WELL, WELL, what can I say? Whatever last week was, boring it wasn't Who would have ex pected a one-day fall of 62 points to be followed in the afternoon by. a 40-point clawback, the next day a 28-point rise and the next day a 25 point rise as well. As I said recently what is least expect ed is what often or even usually happens. So I defy any honest pundit to say he predicted the market to fall by 3 per cent and then rise by 5 per cent, all in the space of three days at least without any fundamental changes anywhere. Newspapers, of course, appear to love crashing markets, as they present an op portunity for sensational headlines, and not only the financial papers but as a cover story. What are the facts? They are that the New York market fell 91 points on Tues day last week a 2.5 per cent fall in one day. But the market at that level was still only 8 per cent off an all-time high. So the events of last week don't even begin to approach .the Rivkin definition of the crash. As it turned out I was in Brisbane last Wednesday morning being part of a panel of three speakers, the sub ject being Healthy, Wealthy auid Wise at an AM Breakfast Club meeting. Bet tina Arndt was Healthy, Phillip Adams was Wise, and that morning I was feeling somewhat less Wealthy. But I did tell the 450 breakfasters that the market would fall sharply and to buy any of the leaders on a 3 per cent fall and that they would laugh all the way to the bank. Many leaders did fall 3 per cent in the hysterical panic of the morning session, only to have prices substantially recover by the end of the day and much higher within two days. The fact is, as I've been saying for a few weeks now, the world is going well, interest rates are at accept able levels, and our stock markets fall from a peak of about 20 per cent has more than taken into account this factor. Panic, by the way, is a trait that smart investors, or traders, should not have in their lexicon, and should exorcise from their psychological make-up or quit in vestment/trading altogether. As is usual, the Press assembled vari ous experts to predict the level of the All Ordinaries index in 12 months time. The range seems to be 1900 to 2100 in the pre dictive scenario. That is a substantial downgrading from where the same pun dits would have predicted the market to be in 18 months, six months ago. And all this because of a 2.5 per cent fall on Wall Street one night? Well, my views have not changed. The world is not in a 1987 crash mode. Equi ties now represent good value, and long-term holders buying now will do ex tremely well over one to two years. Bot toms are impossible to predict, so I have no idea whether the panic merchants have been allowed home from the panic asylum or not. I think, however, that most of the panic is out of the system and that last week's events presented an extremely good buying opportunity. I think and hope I am right only time will tell. Rene Rivkin is a professional investor and writer. He may have a financial interest in the stocks he mentions.
  55. 1994-08-21 Article 118264011, score 9.782459 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DONNA KEEGAN,   MAX KLEVEN,   IRVING THALBERG,   ROGER RABBIT,   GROUND ZERO TEX,   BOB THOMAS,   ROBIN HOOD,   JAMIE LEE CURTIS,   TERRY LEONARD,   LINDA FETTERS,   BRYAN UNGER,   JOHN F. KENNEDY
    Organisations SCREEN ACTORS GUILD,   DIGITAL PICTURES INC.,   STUNTWOMAN'S ASSOCIATION,   SAG,   ASSOCIATED PRESS,   APOCALYPSE /VOIR,   DIRECTORS GUILD OF AMERICA
    Locations LOS ANGELES,   NEW YORK,   FORREST GUMP,   FLORIDA
    Misc DIE HARD
    A star is born: the stunt computer From BOB THOMAS in Los Angeles TOM HANK.S shakes hands with John F. Kennedy. A Florida causeway is destroyed by an explosion. Two new hit films feature those startling scenes, both created by a computer. As seen in Forrest Gump and Trtw Lies, such innovations have prompted some to worry that computers may play a major role in future film-making, perhaps en dangering the livelihood of stunt players and other performers. Stop worrying, advises a cross section of industry folk. If any thing, they say, computers may supply work. Digital Pictures Inc. for example, hired 45 stunt play ers from the Screen Actors Guild for a one-hour, action-packed in teractive video, Ground Zero Tex as. Still, veteran stuntmari and di rector Terry Leonard takes a cau tious view. In New York for Die Hard III, he planned a crash scene on city streets that he fig ured would require 15 stuntmen. By using optical effects and a split screen, he hired only five. Leonard, whose credits include Apocalypse /Voir, Romancing the Stone, Tlte Fugitive (the train crash) and Maverick (the stage coach chase), believes that com puter imaging will affect a lot of things in filmmaking as we know it today . I'm afraid the stuntman enter ing the business today is not go ing to find it as lucrative as in the past, he said. In fact, rais ing horses is looking more at tractive to me than staging stunts, much as I love it. As soon as my boys get out of high school, 1 may start slowing down. Donna Keegan, who doubled for Jamie Lee Curtis in a limo helicopter stunt in True Lies. serves as chairwoman for the SAG's Stunt and Safety Commit tee. and says computers should concern everyone. Look how factory jobs have been lost because of computers, she said. There is fear among stunt people, but we are in con stant negotiations to make sure they are protected. Computer imaging is hot to day. but I think the situation will be much like the music industry. Twenty years ago, everything was synthesised music. That lasted three to five years until people decided the ear doesn't want to tally perfect sound. They would rather hear real music instead of Max Headroom. Keegan cited an example of how computers make stunts safer. I did a 100m fall for Jamie in Mother's Boys. 1 used a 'descend er' [cable] that dropped me 60m and then slowly stopped my fall. I felt it, but it was more like get ting out of bed in the morning. They see no real threat to people Later, the cable was erased from the film by computer. Linda Fetters, who underwent 5'/: hours of makeup for stunts as the Catwoman in Slur Trek V, said that some members of the Stuntwoman's Association have been called for interactive videos. So far, computers haven't worked against us. she said. They're not a great concern for us. We're women, so that auto matically makes us a minority, and we're constantly fighting that. Bryan Unger, of the Directors Guild of America, monitors changing technology. In the short term, we see no threat to our members. he said. Directors still oversee special effects, no matter how they are created. We want to make sure our directors are aware of the lat est developments, and we have been meeting with the various manufacturers. I don't think computer imag ing will hurt us in the long run. said Max Kleven, who has direct ed action lor Batman Returns, the Back to the Future trilogy, ll'lw Framed Roger Rabbit? and Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves. The business is changing. .Now. you can stage a car turn over in the desert and put it on a New York street. You can make a big bang by computer, whereas doing it live would be too expens ive. If it draws people in the the atres, that's good. Any time an action picture is a success, it helps the business. Meanwhile. SAG is closely monitoring the situation, and re mains concerned. But we cannot foresee a situation where actors will be reproduced by com puters, a SAG spokesman said. Film-makers will still depend on performers to give movies the sense of depth, movement and human emotion. You can never duplicate the human soul. The computer revolution is not the first new technology that has caused concern in the Him indus try. When sound was introduced in the late 1920s, many industry leaders predicted it was impractic al. It was too expensive to con vert studios and equip cinemas, they said. Irving Thalberg predict ed, Sound will be an important adjunct to the industry, but it won't replace the silent movie. Associated Press
  56. 1994-12-17 Article 127261094, score 9.77281 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN LANGMORE
    Organisations USTRALIA
    Locations AUSTRALIA,   CANADA,   AUSTRA,   UNITED STATES,   JAPAN
    Misc AUSTRALIAN
    Jobs the loser in interest rate rise This week's rise in interest rates should not have happened. JOHN LANGMORE explains why. USTRALIA'S principal economic and social JL JLproblem is unemploy ment. In November, 820,00 people were actively, but un successfully, looking for work. Hundreds of thousands more would like paid work but have despaired of finding any and are not looking. Their lives are being destroyed and their potential con tribution to improved national living standards is being squan dered. The economy has been growing strongly during 199i and that is increasing employment by 224,000 so far this year. Strong growth tends to lead eventually to higher inflation, but has not done so significantly in Australia yet, and the timing and extent of any price increases depends in part on the policy response. At 1.9 per cent, Australia's in flation rate is less than half the industrialised country average of 4.5 per cent and there are no signs of inflation substantially in creasing. Containing possible future in flation should, therefore, not be nearly as pressing a policy goal at present as reducing unemploy ment. Simultaneous growth of em ployment and restraint of infla tion is possible and that must be and is the Government's aim. The issue is how best to achieve both. There are at least six major reasons why the sharp increase in interest rates this week was misjudged. First, the effects of the in creases in August and October are still working their way through the economy. Their full impact has not yet been felt. There are substantial lags in the effects of interest rate changes. Officials should have waited for several more months before deciding whether to recom mend a further increase. As well, the limited available evidence is mixed, some suggest ing that a slowdown has already started. Lending for housing has already fallen sharply. Measured business and consumer confi dence has already started to fall. NSW manufacturers expected a drop in production and employ ment levels next year before Wed nesday's announcement of an in terest rate rise was made. The rapid national income growth in the year to the September quarter took place before the interest in creases began. Second, the 2.75 per cent in crease in rates will certainly re tard business investment. No-one can be sure by how much but an ecdotal evidence shows that some businesses are already abandon ing or deferring investment. This constrains the growth of productive capacity, so forcing the economy closer to lull capaci ty and so to inflationary pressure sooner. It would be a tragedy to snuff out the recovery of business investment so soon after it has begun. Third, increasing interest rates is directly inflationary because mortgage rates are included in the consumer price index. This will strengthen pressure for 'wage increases. As well, producers and distributors will try and offset the addition to costs from higher rates by increasing prices both perverse consequences. Fourth, the two rate increases have already caused appreciation of the exchange rate, and the third has begun to have the same effect. This retards growth of ex ports, encourages increasing im ports and so constrains reduction of the current account deficit, which is also an important policy goal. FIFTH, Australian real interest rates were already among the highest in industrialised coun tries. The real rate on 10-year bonds was 8.5 per cent in Austra lia in October. Only in Canada among comparable countries was the rate higher (at 8.8 per cent) and in most rates were much lower: around 5 per cent in the US and 1.6 per cent in Japan for example. It is striking that the to tal of the much publicised six rate increases in the US has been less than in Australia. Sixth and most importantly, this week's increase will reduce business activity and so the growth of employment. The alter native. approach to restraining growth by increasing revenue is already on the public policy agen da. An economic statement in Feb ruary introducing modest, pro gressive tax increases would have been a preferable approach to continuing the rapid, damaging increases in interest rates. At least it must be recognised next year that further interest rate in creases are neither inevitable nor automatic. John langmore is Member for Fra ser. ACT.
  57. 1994-12-15 Article 127260551, score 9.697534 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People GAE PINCUS,   JODIE BROUGH,   BILL HAYDEN,   ANDREW THEO PHANOUS,   LIO GAE PINCUS,   LIONEL BOWEN,   GARETH EVANS,   JOHN PAYNE,   NEL MURPHY,   KEL LOGG
    Organisations PINCUS,   NATIONAL FOOD AUTHORITY,   KELLOGG
    Locations SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   OF FICE OF STATUS OF WOMEN
    Food regulator resigns over cereal ingredients By JODIE BROUGH, Government Writer Australia's top independent food regulator has stepped down after fall ing out with her political boss about what can be put in your bowl of Corn Flakes. National Food Authority chairwoman Gae Pincus's re signation yesterday is under stood to have followed months of complaints by the food industry, led by break fast cereal giant Kellogg's. The authority, which ad vises Health Minister Car men Lawrence and her state counterparts on regulation, apparently earned the ire of Kellogg's by recommending against cereal manufacturers being free to put whatever vitamins and minerals they choose into their products. It is understood that the industry successfully lobbied Dr Lawrence's Parliamentary Secretary, Dr Andrew Theo phanous, who has executive control of food matters, to side with them against Ms Pincus. Last night, both Kel logg's and Dr Theophanous's office denied having played a role in Ms Pincus's decision. However, it is understood she had been under siege from Dr Theophanous and that she was obliged to re sign. Ms Pincus leaves behind a long public service career in cluding stints as Justice Lio Gae Pincus: her resignation is understood to have followed complaints by the food industry. nel Murphy's associate and as senior private secretary to Bill Hayden when he was foreign minister, at the Of fice of Status of Women, drafting the unsuccessful Bill of Rights for Gareth Evans and Lionel Bowen and as a senior executive at OTC. She said in a statement she was leaving to return to Sydney where she would pursue new challenges in consulting and the law . In an accompanying state ment, Dr Theophanous said Ms Pincus's commitment and drive have, been evident in the authority's many achievements . A spokesman said Dr Theophanous wasn't under pressure from any source, nor did he put [Ms Pincusj under any pressure . Dr Theophanous stands by the statement in his name praising the work of Ms Pin cus, he said. Any sugges tion that he may have forced her resignation is ludicrous. The battle began in 1992, when the authority em barked on a revision of its standard for fortification with vitamins and minerals. Manufacturers said restric tions should be relaxed. The issue is contentious because the nutritional value of fortification is unproven in some instances. It has been argued that some vita mins and minerals may prove detrimental to certain consumers and that fortifica tion is just a marketing tool. The authority favoured in ternational food standards limiting fortification, arguing that nutrition education should be the major strategy to improve the nutritional status of Australians . It wanted to permit fortifica tion to replace nutrients lost in processing-or where there is an identified and proven public-health need . But the industry success fully lobbied both Dr Theo phanous and state health ministers to knock back the authority's recommendation. The draft was watered down. Kellogg's consumer and corporate affairs manager John Payne agreed the com pany had had a philosophic al disagreement with Ms Pincus. Kellogg's position had been supported by a large number of medical and nutritional authorities. However, while Kellogg's had approached Dr Theophanous and state ministers with supplementary information about fortification, there had been no discussion of Ms Pincus's future.
  58. 1994-03-30 Article 118161241, score 9.6553335 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JEFF KEN NETT,   WILL FAHEY,   JOHN FAHEY
    Organisations INDUSTRY COMMISSION,   BP,   TRADE PRACTICES COMMISSION,   PRICES SURVEILLANCE AUTHORITY,   MOBIL,   SHELL,   AMPOL,   NATIONAL PARTY,   VICTO RIA,   CALTEX
    Locations SOUTH AUSTRALIA,   NEW SOUTH WALES,   MELBOURNE,   TASMANIA,   CANBERRA,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   VICTORIA,   BASS STRAIT
    Misc VICTORIAN,   SOUTH AUS,   AUSTRALIAN
    I (Eke Catikrra imts Petrol changes on the right track THE INDUSTRY. Commis sion is on the right track in its calls for the substantial dereg ulation of the Australian petroleum products industry which has become stifled by government regulation and red tape. The commission's interim report on petroleum products argues that the Prices Surveillance Authority should lose its power to set maxi mum wholesale prices, and that leg islation governing the number of service stations in Australia and who should own them, should be re pealed. It argues that the industry is capable of self-regulation. It is a report which has been wel comed by the major oil companies, but seriously questioned by service station owners and petrol distribu tors. At the heart of the disquiet ex pressed by the service station owners and the distributors is their distrust of the major oil companies - Shell, Caltex, BP, Ampol and Mobil. Past experience has taught distributors and service station owners that a leg islative buffer is needed; that, unfet tered, the major oil companies can, and do, wield enormous market power and influence. But the arguably justified misgiv ings of the service station owners and the petrol distributors should not be allowed to detract from the central thrust of the Industry Commission's interim report - that the productiv ity, efficiency and price-competitive ness of Australia's petroleum products industry is being ham strung by government regulation and red tape. The petroleum products industry is possibly the most regulated sector in Australia. From the time crude oil is pumped from Bass Strait until it is pumped into a consumer's petrol tank it is subject to a myriad of Com monwealth, state and local govern ment controls. Over the years, layer upon layer of legislative and admin istrative controls have been applied to the petroleum products sector. Their economic and regulatory legit imacy has rarely been reviewed. The bottom line of the myriad of regula tions and controls which apply to petroleum products production, dis tribution and sale in Australia is that they have made the end product more expensive. More importantly, the Industry Commission has cor rectly identified the fact that few of the controls have actually proved ef fective. For this reason there is consider able merit in the commission's argu ment that the layers of regulation and legislation should be wound back and that there should be more reliance on self-regulation. However it should not be over looked that at least some of the exist ing regulations are necessary and that some damaging distortions will likely occur if they are removed. In line with the concerns expressed by the service station industry and pet rol distributors, the Government should ensure that the major oil companies are not allowed unfet tered market domination. If, as recommended, the Prices Surveillance Authority is to be re moved from the scene along with the legislation governing retail sites and franchises, then the Trade Practices Commission must be fully empow ered to prevent the major oil compa nies from exercising their considerable commercial and finan cial power. The interests of the small operator and the consumer must be protected. The interests of regional centres such as Canberra must also be pro tected. Recent history has presented Canberra as an object lesson in what can happen when market forces are distorted despite the best intentions of government regulators. The Industry Commission is right when it concludes that market forces should drive the Australian petro leum products industry, but it is wrong to assume that it will continue to be adequately driven without some legislative safeguards. Will Fahey see the light? THE NSW Premier, John Fahey, has wisely deferred a decision on daylight saving. There is, after all, time to spare. In the past few weeks, the subject has generated a lot of heat and not a lot of... well,... light. The Victorian Premier, Jeff Ken nett, wants to extend daylight saving from its present four months to just shy of six months - from the first weekend in October to the last week end in March. The main reason he has given is social - the running of the grand prix and the various au tumn festivals. The ACT has similar autumn festivals and it, too, would concur with Mr Kennett's concerns. These social events, of course, have a significant economic impact through tourism. Mr Fahey has been unmoved by the social arguments. The only thing that has moved him from intractable support for the present four-month period has been a business argument - that the Melbourne Stock Ex change would get an hour's jump on Sydney for two months of the year. Daylight saving was shortened to the present four months by NSW three years ago. The ACT, Victoria and South Australia felt they had to fall into line. Tasmania stayed with the six months. Now Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania have called for a six-month period and want NSW to follow. Clearly, it is in the best economic interests of the nation if Sydney and Melbourne are in the same time zone. It makes sense for the whole nation to move to daylight saving, as one, for a fixed period. On the economic and democratic argument it would make sense if NSW, Victoria, the ACT, South Aus tralia and Tasmania moved as one with daylight saving from early Oc tober to late March. It would make even better sense if the other states and territory joined them. While the needs of the people in the western parts of the seaboard states should not be ignored and should be treated sympathetically, the national benefits of consistent time zones should be the dominant consideration. In any case though, it would be plainly idiotic for NSW to have a different summer period from Victo ria, Tasmania and South Australia. In the name of convenience, energy savings and economics, the premiers should take a national approach to daylight saving and put aside the petty parochialism being peddled by the National Party in the far west of NSW. By deferring the decision, Mr Fahey will get time to work them around.
  59. 1994-01-09 Article 126921679, score 9.560289 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALAN THORNHILL,   JOHN DAWKINS,   JOE SMITH
    Organisations PARLIAMENT,   ANZ
    Locations AUSTRALIA
    Credit card claims misleading By ALAN THORNHILL DONT be misled by the latest cuts in credit card interest rates. They look a lot bigger than they really are, and in many cases the gains the public actually makes will be slight. And, with interest-free periods being trimmed and new entry charges being introduced, some people will even find themselves paying more than ever for the privilege of using their cards. The former Federal Treasurer, John Dawkins, said in midDecember that there had been quite astonishing improvements since the banks were allowed to impose an annual charge on credit cards. The fees, which some people thought would be very high, have been announced at very modest levels, largely between 18 and 24 a year, Mr Dawkins told Parliament. In return, we have seen a reduction in credit card interest rates generally of around 4 per centage points, down to about 14.5 per cent, he said. Mr Dawkins said, too, that credit card interest rates had dropped from a peak of 24 per cent, a little more than two years ago, to levels hovering as low as the 12 per cent mark now. As usual, Mr Dawkins was being very charitable. He also talked about nominal, not real, interest rates. The picture that emerges, if we take inflation into account, is quite different. High interest rates are, in large part, a product of high inflation. Credit card interest rates peaked at 24.84 per cent in June 1990. That was just three months after Australia's inflation hit a peak of 8.6 per cent. So the real interest rate on credit cards then was 16.24 per cent. A table Mr Dawkins released, shortly after he spoke, shows that the ANZ bank will be charging just 14.75 per cent on the Visa cards it offers, with an annual fee of 22, from December 1. Where does that leave Joe Smith, ANZ customer, with an average credit card debt of, say, 1000, over the following year? If inflation stays at 2.2 per cent, Joe will hardly benefit at all. True his real interest rate will be 12.55 per cent, once inflation is taken into account. But, with the new 22 fee added, the effective real interest rate that he faces will, once again, be 14.75 per cent. So Joe's charges, in reality, will be just 14.90 a year less than they were in the worst of the bad times. That is, Joe stands to save less than 30 cents a week, in real terms, from what Mr Dawkins calls quite astonishing im- provements. The banks have long been contemptuous of the people a senior executive once admitted the industry privately calls freeloaders . That is those who pay off their outstanding balances within their interest-free periods. It was the banks' determina- tion to make the freeloaders pay something that drove the campaign they ran for years to secure a right to charge an annual fee for credit cards. The banks have long regarded their returns on credit cards as too low. And that, basically, is why they held credit card rates at relatively high levels, for quite a long time after other interest rates started to fall. A major inquiry that a federal parliamentary committee conducted into Australia's banking industry reported in November 1991 that credit card rates had not only stuck at high levels, for a substantial period, but in some cases the interest-free period has decreased as well. The message, as always, is caveat emptor, or buyer beware. It is always wise to be careful with credit.
  60. 1994-11-03 Article 130535187, score 9.558638 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DA VID WHITE,   LES HOSKING,   NOBBY CLARK,   MR WHITE,   JOHN SMITH,   WHITBREAD PIC
    Organisations INNTREPRENEUR,   FEDERAL COURT,   SYDNEY FUTURES EXCHANGE,   FOSTER'S BREWING GROUP LTD,   SFE,   ASX,   S&N,   AUSTRALIAN STOCK EXCHANGE,   AUSTRALIAN SECURITIES COMMISSION,   LEPO,   WHITBREAD,   NEWCASTLE PIC
    Locations LONDON,   MELBOURNE,   SYDNEY,   BRITAIN,   CARLSBURY-TETLEY,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc CORPORATIONS LAW,   SCOTTISH,   BRITISH
    Futures exchange loses battle SYDNEY: The Sydney Futures Exchange lost a major battle over derivatives products yesterday when the Federal Court dis missed its attempt to stop the Australian Stock Exchange from trading the new Low Exercise Price Option. , And in a new twist in the bat tle for coverage of increasingly popular hedging products, the ASX's director of derivatives, Da vid White, said the court action may have backfired on the SFE possibly preventing trade in a new product similar to the dis puted LEPO. . The judgment appears to mean that SFE may not be able to introduce its proposed deliver able share futures, Mr White said. The ASX now plans to finalise discussions with the Australian Securities Commission with a view to beginning trade in LEPOs by early December, although the SFE said it was considering an appeal against yesterday's judg ment. It would appear that this deci sion has been based on technical, legal grounds and we are now ! seeking advice as to whether to lodge an appeal, SFE chief exec ' utive Les Hosking said. SFE's view is that LEPOs have essentially the same profit and loss characteristics as futures contracts and therefore should be subject to the same customer pro tection mechanisms, he said. But Justice Sackville ruled LE POs were securities to be traded on the ASX, rather than futures to be traded on the SFE. The SFE had claimed the ASX's plan to trade LEPOs would create a futures market and this would contravene the Corporations Law, under which only the SFE is ap proved as a futures exchange. But Justice Sackville upheld the ASX's claim that the LEPO was a security as defined under Section 92 of the Corporations Law rather than a commodity as defined in Chapter Eight of the law, which governs futures. Foster's may drop Courage '; MELBOURNE: Market specula tion is mounting in London that Foster's Brewing Group Ltd is planning to sell its troubled Brit ish Courage brewing unit and at tempting to extricate itself from its Inntrepreneur pub partner ship. London-based drinks analysts see British brewers Scottish and. Newcastle Pic and Whitbread Pic as among the favourites to take over Courage's five UK breweries, but a takeover would have to get around potential monopoly and regulatory concerns. Market talk heightened after Foster's annual meeting in Mel bourne on Monday where chair man Nobby Clark said concern over Courage was a drag on Fos ter's share price. The UK assets are having a very severe drag on the share price. The perception in the in vestment community is that it is like a black hole and we keep shoving money towards it, he aid. We have got to deal with this problem in the next year or so, Mr Clark told shareholders. UK analysts said S&N and Whitbread were among those fav oured to take over Britain's sec ond largest brewer, which has 19 per cent of the market and brews Foster's, John Smith's and Cour age and has a string of licensed beer brands. But S&N, with around 12 per cent market share and Whitbread with 13 per cent, would immedi ately fall foul of British monopoly guidelines, which are triggered at over 25 per cent. Bass with 23 per cent is seen too large to mount a takeover and Carlsbury-Tetley is still struggling with its newly formed UK brewing joint venture. Courage in Britain declined comment on the market talk.
  61. 1994-10-30 Article 118294751, score 9.429936 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People TOM BURNS,   BRIAN HOWE,   GRAHAM RICH ARDSON,   ALEXANDER DOWNER,   PAUL KEATING,   BOB HAWKE,   JOHN KERIN,   TIM FISCHER
    Organisations LABOR,   CABINET,   LIBERAL FEDERAL COUNCIL,   BETTER CITIES,   LABOR PARTY,   NATIONAL PARTY
    Locations QUEENSLAND
    Misc CAUCUS,   AUSTRALIAN
    I had to lie from time to time, which I did, says Richardson in new book By CRISPIN HULL Former Senator Graham Rich ardson has openly admitted ly ing in the cause of putting Paul Keating in the Lodge. A spokeswoman for the Lead er of the Opposition, Alexander Downer, said he would not com ment on it yesterday. However, the Leader of the National Party, Tim Fischer, said yesterday that it was no wonder people had such a jaun diced view of politicians when a former Cabinet minister cheer fully admitted he is a liar . In extracts from his memoirs - Whatever it Takes - pub lished in The Australian at the weekend, Mr Richardson justi fied his lying because he had to prevent damage to the party while still keeping Paul Keating's challenge hopes alive between the first unsuccessful challenge to Bob Hawke in June 1991 and the successful chal lenge in December 1991. My dilemma was to keep the challenge going, while winning more Caucus votes than the process of keeping it alive was losing us, he wrote. To some people,- however, my position was obviously seen as equivocal. ... dampening speculation about a challenge was absolute ly necessary on several occa sions: sometimes in public, of ten in private. When Caucus anger was boiling over and the temperature needed to be low ered, I had no hesitation in do ing it or causing it to be done. This did not indicate treachery to Keating, but the difficulty I was having in helping him be come Prime Minister without destroying the party. This sounds uncharacteris tically noble, but having said that I have to add that to achieve that goal successfully I had to lie from time to time - which I did. He mentioned a 2KY inter view with Mr Hawke in which I said publicly that no chal lenge was planned, which was true enough because the second time around there would not be one without my agreement . What I didn't say was that as soon as Hawke made a big mistake, we would be off like a shot. But if the votes had not been secure at the end of the year, then the challenge would be off. Mr Richardson had also held back after the launch of Fightback so Labor's attack on it would not be jeopardised. And in the most Machiavel lian admission, Mr Richardson said he had advised Mr Hawke to do a major Cabinet reshuffle to give his Government re newed vigour, knowing that Mr Hawke was unlikely to have the courage to do any such thing. Mr Hawke had been more likely to water down the advice to a mere movement of one or two ministers which would re sult in Mr Hawke looking weak and looking like he was pre pared to allow one minister, John Kerin, to be the fall guy for a poor government response to Fightback. And this is what happened, Mr Richardson revealed also that he had had to do a job on Queensland Deputy Premier, Tom Burns, for accusing Mr Keating of gross disloyalty, but later at Mass held after the death of the son of an MP, Mr Burns had turned around at the time to give the peace sign and had been surprised to see Mr Richardson. They had ex changed peace be with you greetings. Mr Richardson had told Mr Keating that Mr Keating could not win the next election. He revealed also that approv al for the 800-million Better Cities program had not been given without proper scrutiny of details or testing by econom ic ministers, but had been ap proved by Mr Hawke and Depu ty Prime Minister Brian Howe because it had been Mr Howe's special project and Mr Howe's Left faction had supported Mr Hawke in the first challenge. The approval had shown John Kerin as a weak Treasurer, Mr Richardson said. Former Sena tor Richardson has cheerfully admitted he is a liar, Mr Fisch er said. It is no wonder that people have such a jaundiced view of politicians when a for mer Cabinet minister makes that sort of admission. The internal machinations of the Labor Party will give under whelming confidence to the peo ple with both the Richardson revelations on how Hawke was rolled through to the 1 per cent interest rate hike this week. Richardson: observer at the Liberal Federal Council
  62. 1994-07-27 Article 118193692, score 9.427103 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALISON LEVER,   JOHN ZANFIRACHE,   SAMANTHA COX,   JUDY OAKES,   LISA-MARIE VIZANIARI,   JOHN HOURIGAN,   DANIELA COSTIAN
    Organisations AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF SPORT,   COMMONWEALTH
    Locations CANBERRA,   SYDNEY,   ENGLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   AUCKLAND,   MYRTLE AUGEE,   VICTORIA,   NARRABEEN,   BULGARIA,   ATLANTA,   BRIS,   GREECE,   BRISBANE
    Misc WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS,   AUSTRALIANS,   GAMES,   COMMONWEALTH GAMES,   ENGLISH,   GREEK,   AUSTRALIAN
    Gearing up for a record-breaking return By JOHN HOURIGAN A bouncer from Heaven , ad mitting to being overweight and with a reconstructed knee held firm by a couple of screws, is quietly hoping for a more than creditable return in the interna tional arena at the Common wealth Games next month. Limbering up in a black track suit, which was cunninply a bit big, Lisa-Marie Vizaniari, watched the rain fall and opted out of competition at the Games team meet at Narrabeen on Sat urday. I know I'm overweight if I tell you how much, promise not to print it but I disguise it well ... 95kg would be good, but my weight won't affect my per formances, she said. Lisa-Marie, 22, overwhelmed by the financial support she is receiving from Canberra's Greek community, says she can now af ford to buy equipment, food sup plements and vitamins that she needs before the Games, where she will compete in the discus and shot put Lisa-Marie's sporting story began on a visit to Greece in 1985-86. It traces the excitement of a rising star, the devastation of injury just after her first major breakthrough, the disillusion ment which caused a loss of self-confidence and self-esteem, a complete turn-around and instant success and now perhaps the path to a fairy-tale ending. In Greece, Lisa-Marie was in troduced to discus throwing. About 18 months later she was accepted on scholarship at the Australian Institute of Sport. She quickly asserted her po tential with a silver medal for a 60.44m throw at the world junior championships in Bulgaria. Then she won gold with 56.38m at the Auckland Com monwealth Games. But her world turned upside down later in 1990 when liga ment damage in her right knee forced a full reconstruction. She was out for three years. I let myself go and put on a lot of weight ... for a time I worked as a bouncer at a Can berra nightclub, Heaven ... I did some weightlifting and I tried Lisa-Marie Vizaniari sights set on a powerful comeback at next month's Commonwealth Games. kick-boxing but I was going around in circles, Lisa-Marie said. Then one day I said to my self, hey, this is no good, I've got to try again. Lisa-Marie set about that comeback last November and in March at the nationals she made it as third Australian in both dis cus and shot. In the short term she was off to her second Commonwealth Games. In the long term, she realises her best is way down the track, the World Championships next year, Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000. In my sport they say you don't peak until you're 30. I have been training in Bris bane. John Zanfirache has been coaching me no one appreei-; ates just how good he is and I trained with Daniela Costian. It was a real honour. I didn't train for the shot be fore the nationals but I have had 10 sessions since and got out.a 16.10m at the Brisbane competi tion last week. That is only 4cm off my best and that was when I was 16. Lisa-Marie is ranked in the top eight in the Commonwealth in both events. If there is one gold medal Aus tralia can count on, it is Cos tian's in the discus. She is 10m ahead of her rivals. But you could throw a blanket over the rest of the field and Lisa-Marie and Australia's other representa tive, Alison Lever, are top pro-; spects. As for the shot put, the English duo Judy Oakes and Myrtle Augee have the form'on the board but otherwise it is a toss-up for the bronze. Oakes, the silver medallist in Auckland with 18.43m and who has come out of retirement to compete in Victoria, quickly ' found form this year with 18.38m to head the Commonwealth rank ings. Augee won gold in Auck land with 18.48m and is presently No 2 with 17.37m: England is chasing a clean sw;eep with Y Hanson-Nortey, third in Auckland and currently No 5. However, the Australians, Costian, Samantha Cox and Lis a-Marie will be well in conten tion. Lisa-Marie comes across, as being very humble about her ath letic ability and you won't Ijeaj her expounding her medal pro spects. t , But for certain she is begin ning to feel the adrenalin pump: ing. C '
  63. 1994-05-04 Article 118209248, score 9.422684 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BRUCE JUDDERY,   RON JOHNSTON,   SUSAN SERJEANTSON
    Organisations JOHN CURTIN SCHOOL OF MEDICAL RESEARCH,   IAS,   AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY,   NATIONAL BOARD OF EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION AND TRAINING,   SENATE,   INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES,   SYDNEY UNIVERSITY,   AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL
    Locations AUSTRALIA
    A few ruffled feathers after report on IAS ja. By BRUCE JUDDERY THE JUSTIFICATION of the Australian National University's research-only Institute of Advanced Studies comes under severe question in a report prepared for the National Board of Employment, Education and Training. But institute director Professor Susan Serjeantson has hit back, suggesting that the report's writers, led by Sydney University's Professor Ron Johnston in effect have misinterpreted their own data. The report, The Effects of Resource Concentration on Research Performance, comes only months before a joint review of the institute by panels nominated by the ANU and Australian Research Council, and on the eve of a major strategic planning exercise to draw parameters for the institute over the next 10 years. Its chief finding is that the most productive research comes from teams of five to 12 members. But its several pages of analysis of IAS results hint strongly that concentrations such as that found in the institute are unnecessary for critical mass of research endeavour. A key element in the analysis entailed following the careers of 33 scientists who had moved from the IAS to state universities and mixed teaching-research careers. Their productivi- ty was measured on the basis of Harris Points a methodology that entails allocating scores to various modes of research publication. The chief bone of contention is the report's conclusion that The overall total average research output, over four years for each disciplinary group ing, is not significantly different in the IAS from that achieved in state uni- versities , though it does acknowledge a slight decline in productivity following departure from the IAS research-only environment . Not so, says Professor Serjeantson. The slight decline on the report's figures is a full one-fifth. Those moving from the IAS reported a fall of 20 per cent in their productivity in state universities, even though, in fact, they had matured in their careers, she says. For Australia to achieve top international recognition, research resources need to be concentrated, not spread thinly through the Unified National System. The research output was three times higher for special research centres than for non-centre, research grantees. In fact, Professor Serjeantson considers the report strongly endorses the concentration of research funding in centres of excellence such as the IAS''. But her assertion conflicts with the report's conclusion that It would seem to be significant that the overall average productivity between disciplines/schools varies surprisingly little between the full-time research [including postgraduate education] environment of the IAS and the demands of teaching-and-research within the state systems . These findings provide no support for the assumptions that researchers would be more productive in the research-only situation, where they presumably have more time to devote to research. HOWEVER, it concedes, the sample is unique in that it only describes academics moving from a research-only situation in the IAS to a teaching-and-research position. Those moving from a research-only position elsewhere may present a different picture. Feathers are likely to be ruffled; at the ANU not so much by a wrangle over the value of the report's analysis as by its inclusion of comments from eight of the scientists who had moved on. Only one, an earth scientist, is unstinting in praise of the IAS. Others are at best tepid, and suggest their new positions are more demanding. Several assail the institute for excessive bureaucracy. One from the John Curtin School of Medical Research, and perhaps reflecting the strife that was aired extensively in recent Senate committee hearings remarks that research funds are easier to come by at the state university level.
  64. 1994-01-11 Article 126921970, score 9.389065 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People STEVE ROBERTS,   DAVID DE GARIS,   DE GARIS,   JOHN LARUM,   GRANT BAILEY,   ROB ERT EGGERT,   FAY RICHWHITE
    Organisations CITIBANK,   SBC AUSTRALIA,   AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS,   BLUE CHIP ECONOMIC INDICATORS,   FED,   COMMONWEALTH BANK,   BLUE CHIP,   ANZ,   BLUE CHIP CON SENSUS
    Locations MELBOURNE,   WASHINGTON,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   SOUTH AUS TRALIA,   UNITED STATES
    Misc BUDSET,   T-NOTE,   BLUE CHIP
    BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT Strengthening economy expected to deliver a lower federal Budset deficit SYDNEY: A six-month period of stronger-than-expected economic growth is expected to force the Fed eral Government's 1993-94 Budget deficit prediction down in coming weeks. ! Economists agree that the 16 billion deficit forecast in the August Budget is too high and the revised figure is tipped to be between 12 billion and 15 billion. ; SBC Australia chief economist John Larum said, I think the Gov ernment is somewhat surprised by the strength of the economic recov ery... We're certainly going to see a better Budget deficit than 16 bil lion. At the low end. of expectations, Fay Richwhite economist Steve Roberts was tipping a drop to 12 billion or lower. I think the Government gave it self a lot of leeway with the 16 billion forecast, he said. Now the stronger economic growth rate is chipping in and helping. Analysts pointed to the Govern ment's upward revision of real growth in gross domestic product, from 2.75 per cent to 3 per cent, and higher-than-expected employment levels as the bases for the lower deficit. Mr Larum, who forecast a fall to 14.5 billion, said, We already know the economy is stronger than the 2.75 per cent expectation and higher employment levels will help [Pay-As-You-Earn] receipts. The sale of 1.7 billion worth of Commonwealth Bank shares in No vember will help trim the deficit bill. Four months of higher PA YE tax scales before the November tax cuts took effect will also ease the expen diture burden. Citibank economist Grant Bailey said that a slimmer budget deficit, around his 15 billion forecast, could cut the Government's bond issuance program from 17.7 bil lion. So far 11.3 billion worth of Com monwealth bonds are on issue. The alternative, however, is that the Government will keep up its bond levels and instead run down T-note issues, which have built up substan tially in the past few years. It's looking like the funding pro gram could be reduced, although the Government will probably still keep it running at a reasonable rate to provide a T-note run-down, Mr Bailey said. The Government is expected to announce its mid-year Budget revi sions by mid-February, swiftly fol lowed in May by the 1994-95 Bud get. WASHINGTON: Many finan cial experts believe the United States economy will post its stron gest performance in five years this year, but it will not be as robust as the final months of 1993. The consensus of 51 economists polled early this month by Blue Chip Economic Indicators was that the economy would grow by 3 per cent after inflation this year. If the economists are right, that would be the biggest increase since a 3.9 per cent expansion in 1988. Last month, the Blue Chip panel lists projected 1994 growth of 2.9 per cent. The editor of the newsletter, Rob ert Eggert, said that many of those surveyed had attributed their pre diction of stronger growth to a belief that the economic momentum evi dent in 1993's final quarter now forecast at an annual rate of 4.2 per cent would carry into 1994. Strength in housing, autos and other consumer durables, as well as business spending for ... equip ment, is expected to persist into the new year, he added. First quarter real GDP is expected to grow at an annual rate of 3 per cent. US Gross Domestic Product ex panded 2.5 per cent in 1989 and 1.2 per cent in 1990, before shrinking to 0.7 per cent in 1991. The economy then picked up 2.6 per cent in 1992 and, according to the Blue Chip con sensus, grew 2.8 per cent last year. The US Government will report the 1993 GDP figures on January 28. The Blue Chip survey mirrors other recent forecasts that the mo mentum of the final quarter of 1993 will push the US economy ahead this year, but at a slower Dace than in those months. - w ANZ job ads series shows continuing increase MELBOURNE: The ANZ job advertisement series rose by an ad justed 12.7 per cent over December 1993, compared to a 4.5 per cent monthly increase in November. In trend terms, the number of job advertisements was up 43 per cent, following a 5.1 per cent trend rise in November. The further rise in the job ads series in December 1993 indicates 1994 will bring welcome news on the labour market front, ANZ senior economist David de Garis said yes terday. In seasonally adjusted terms, the average number of weekly adver tisements in major metropolitan newspapers increased 34.7 per cent over the year to December, com pared to 32.3 per cent to November. The job ads series suggests em ployment growth will gather mo mentum during the first half of 1994, Mr de Garis said. Job advertisements also in creased in all states but South Aus tralia in December 1993 compared to a year earlier. In monthly trend terms, SA re corded a 0.1 per cent fall. Western Australia recorded the highest yearly rise at 43.3 per cent, with a 3.5 per cent increase in trend terms in December. Australian Bureau of Statistics employment and unemployment da ta for December will be issued on Thursday.
  65. 1994-06-06 Article 118168902, score 9.388459 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People HARVEY KEITEL,   GLENN CLOSE,   MADGE ALSOP,   ADRIAN DUNBAR,   MARLENE DIETRICH,   SHARON STPNE,   JOAN PLOWRIGHT,   JOAN CRAWFORD,   JOHN IRVIN,   KATY DALY,   SHIRLEY VALENTINE,   JO-ANN STUBBINGS,   MIA FARROW,   BETTE DAVIS,   MISS O'HARE,   KATHARINE HEPBURN,   BABY JANE,   NATASHA RICHARDSON
    Organisations YANKEES
    Locations ENGLAND,   KILSHANNON,   MEDITERRANEAN,   GREECE,   O'HARE
    Misc MISS O'HARE,   IRISH,   ENGLISH,   AMERICAN
    Women's films 'come of age' By JO-ANN STUBBINGS A PATTERN is emerging in cinema today as regular as the rise and fall of popcorn prices. It has nothing to do with the growth of violent movies, however, or Harvey Keitel baring his bottom in anything from The Piano to Bad Lieutenant. It has to do with women's films . You must go and see this movie. It's absolutely marvellous . . . runs the familiar refrain. I don't think your husband would enjoy it though. It's really a women's film. There was a time when women's films were simply vehicles for strong female characters to attract a general audience. Bette Davis feeding dead budgies to a bed-ridden Joan Crawford in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane enjoyed broad appeal. And so did Marlene Dietrich strolling round in strides, and Katharine Hepburn giving Tracy what-for in any number of their films. The femme fatale too wielded power in higher places. Today's bitch batch Sharon Stpne and Glenn Close included command as much if not more respect than their male counterpart. And certainly higher wardrobe fees. The thing is, these movies were made with both the male and female audience in mind. The new wave of women's films I'm talking about is specifically designed to bore the boardshorts off the most earnest bloke. They are movies about women for women. If a film today lacks violence and bad language, if the sex stays off the kitchen table and remains behind silk screens on the bed, it just might be a women's film. If the female protagonists meet at regular intervals, giggle, comb each other's hair and complain about the men in their lives it most definitely is a women's film. My husband says I have the face of a disappointed Madonna, says one character in Enchanted April. Complains another: My husband never says a word too much or too little. Sometimes I think he keeps photocopies of everything he says . Just two years after Shirley Valentine nicked off to Greece to grow and left her hubbie to fry his own eggs, the twinset-and-pearls girls in Enchanted April leave cold old England and its colder chaps for the Mediterranean. In Thelma and Louise, the Yankees take blooming and growing one step further, shooting at any man who fails to show them some respect. Louise assures Thelma she ain't crazy: This is just the first time you've had to really express yourself . John Irvin's recent film, Widow's Peak, pitted with female crowd scenes and Joan Plowright doing what she did in Enchanted April but with an Irish accent, promised to fall once again into the chick flick category. The setting itself a cosy Irish village by single dames having a damn good time without men rings the first alarm bells. Plowright opens proceedings with a crazy car ride through the beautiful streets of Kilshannon, her female chauffeur knocking silly men off their bikes along the way. And then a group of widows with a curious resemblance to Madge Alsop smashes old ornaments against their dear ones' graves. Yes, siree, we're in feline territory. The classic symptoms continue with the major male characters portrayed as bumbling idiots. Plowright's mummy's boy, played by Adrian Dunbar, is a victim from his opening scene in the dentist's chair to his pathetic demise sinking up to the knees in a canoe. Miss O'Hare's (Mia Farrow's) suitor makes a goat of himself over a cup of tea and a cat . . . Suddenly the women's film feel of the movie changes direction. Unlike the studied cuteness of Steel Magnolias and the tweeness of any number of films taken with a neenish tart and a sandwich basket at organised film luncheons, Widow's Peak is genuinely funny. Joan Plowright's words are wittier this time round, the characters more comic and, best of all, no-one suds up in sentiment. There just isn't time. When swishy widow played by Natasha Richardson sashays on to the scene to take up residence on Widow's Peak, the village is a-buzz. Plowright twiddles her indoor telescope like she's never done before, the local gossip whips out her drinking glass, gleaning tittle-tattle through solid brick walls. And the questions come thick and fast. Who is the English newcomer with the American accent? Why doesn't Miss O'Hare like her? Why did the car roll down the hill? Who fiddled with Miss O'Hare's bike brakes? Could we be talking about . . . MOIDER? With a plot that has more twists and turns than an Irish back lane, Widow's Peak moves happily from comedy to mystery thriller to melodrama and farce. Crowd scenes, like the cluster of brown-hatted reporters, are so organised they might break into a Fred Astaire number. And nobody is too worried about the prospect of murder a week after the disappearance of Miss O'Hare, Murder Cruises on the lake are thriving. Clearly, the film is sending itself up and with it the widows in black, the naughty newcomer in white, the gormless men and the implausible plot. So there are more questions raised at the end of the film than jiggers at the Katy Daly dance hall. At ieast everyone in the audience has a few laughs. Including the men.
  66. 1994-08-29 Article 118265828, score 9.325734 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People CURTIS STRANGE,   GREG NORMAN,   JOHN DALY,   ARNOLD PALMER
    Organisations UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS,   THE TIMES OF LONDON
    Locations AKRON
    Misc WORLD SERIES OF GOLF,   BELLSOUTH CLASSIC,   PGA CHAMPIONSHIP
    SPORT Good-time golfer is back, but not forgiven AKRON: John Daly knows that his fellow golfers are watching, many of them waiting for him to take yet another big fall. I know I have made some mistakes, he said. But 1 would never say anything to hurt the tour, but I know some guys aren't happy with me. I wish they would tell me so, I'd rather have them scold me [than ignore him]. I'm not afraid of being scolded. Daly was referring to a July 9 story, origin ally in The Times of London, that received world-wide exposure. He was only three months out of alcohol rehabilitation and was quoted as saying, There are certain players on the tour who do crazy stuff, but they're never going to get exposed unless they are found out by the police and put in jail. He also advocated random drug testing for PGA pros. The opinion of most pros was, Who is Daly to talk? All I was trying to say is that I wasn't the only guy with a problem out there, he said. But it was taken out of context, and people thought I was attacking the tour. Veteran pro Curtis Strange said it another way: John Daly ought to crawl back under the rock from where he came . Many other pros did not make public state ments. They simply shunned him. I respect Greg Norman because he came up and asked me about the story, Daly said. I explained it to him, and things are good between us. I wish Curtis Strange had done the same. [They played together on Friday but hardly spoke.] ljust want to straighten this out and move on. Daly will never be voted Mr Personality in a PGA clubhouse, but it is a different story on the course. Even though he has no chance of winning this week's World Series of Golf, he draws one of the largest galleries. Fans relate to me bccausc I'm a blue-collar player, sort of like Arnold Palmer, he said. Well, he is not exactly like Palmer, and his popularity confuses and bothers some PGA players. Many pros believe Daly is cocky and very capable of saying some rather dumb things. They do not care that Daly came out of nowhere to win the 1991 PGA Championship. Nor do they carc that fans are attracted to his outrageous long driving and even more outra geous lifestyle. Fans see Daly as a blond, becr drinkin , chceseburgcr-catin', good ol' boy from the University of Arkansas. To the pros, he is a guy who never could turn it off. Golf was a big party, and the booze flowed until he nearly drowned. He was arrested and charged with assault on his wife. He trashed hotel rooms and walked ofT the course in the middle of two PGA tournaments. All of the ugly incidents forced the PGA to suspend him for the first three months of this year. Daly needs to understand that his peers believe he embarrassed himself and the tour. Just because he entered a rehabilitation centre in January docs not mean everything is forgiv en or forgotten. Now Daly is back, and he says he is sober. To qualify for the World Scries, Daly won the BellSouth Classic in early May. After all I've been through, I never . thought I'd win a tournament this year, he said. It meant a lot to me to win it while sober. But that does not make everything OK. The man wants acceptance. 1 realise that golf is such a bigbusiness that it's hard to be close to people, but... His voice trailed off. As if Daly docs not have enough to worry about, his back hurts. It felt good early in the week, but about the 10th hole, I felt something, and my caddy heard it pop, he said. It has been swelling up for a while. I've had MRIs, bone scans, all of that stuff. The doctors didn't find anything major that is wrong with it. They think that 1 need to rest it for a month. Daly added: The crazy thing is that after I hurt my back, I shot a two-under on the back nine. So you figure it out. Daly is 28 and seems to be feeling very alone. He is in the midst of a divorce. Most of his fellow pros would rather go out with some one else. I have fans giving mc things like the Seren ity Prayer and telling mc that they understand what I've been through. Fans like that are the ones who have meant the most to me. And he docs need them now more than ever. Knight-flidder
  67. 1994-10-23 Article 118293440, score 9.213112 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People HILLARY CLINTON,   JEAN-BERTRAND ARISTIDE,   RICHARD NIXON,   BILL CLINTON,   SADDAM HUSSEIN,   GEORGE MCGOVERN,   SADDAM HUSSEINS,   RAOUL CEDRAS,   MITT ROMNEY,   TED KENNEDY
    Organisations UN SECURITY COUNCIL,   BUDGET,   CONGRESS,   HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,   SENATE,   NATO
    Locations FRANCE,   WHITE HOUSE,   HAITI,   RUSSIA,   KUWAIT,   CAPITOL HILL,   MASSACHUSETTS,   IRAQ,   BOSNIA,   PANAMA,   UNITED STATES,   PORT-AU-PRINCE
    Misc REPUBLICANS,   AMERICANS,   SERBS,   REPUBLICAN,   MUSLIM,   DEMOCRATS,   DEMOCRAT
    Diminishing options for troubled Clinton MID-TERM ELECTIONS in the United States are notorious for their volatility and for their dangers to incumbent senators and congressmen who share the president's political allegiance. The reasons are not hard to discern: presidents are principally concerned with their own re-election so they take the so-called tough decisions a good distance out from their own polling day in their first term of office. In their second term, their thoughts stray to their place in the history books and almost invariably this is bad news for their confederates on Capitol Hill - unless, of course, they can find a good, clean, eminently winnable war. In that case, everyone is happy apart from the opposition but there are not too many Saddam Husseins to go around. Indeed, the man himself is somewhat diminished these days, not quite the mad demon of the Bush administration. But he has been sufficiently helpful to Bill Clinton to stave off what was looming as an electoral disaster in the November poll. Mr Clinton's stocks have risen slightly since he elevated President Saddam's troop movements within Iraq but with a somewhat provocative, even cheeky, concentration on the south into a full-scale threat to Kuwait. By responding with a massive logistical exercise in which more than 30,000 troops and a vast armoury were transported to Kuwait almost overnight, Mr Clinton showed he was ready for action. US opinion polls reflected popular, if muted, applause. When President Saddam retreated a little, the Clinton Administration sought to humiliate him still further by declaring an exclusion zone for his armed forces in a large area of southern Iraq. But other permanent members of the UN Security Council, notably France and Russia, declined to be part of the posturing and Mr Clinton had to be content with his earlier victory. Closer to home, the President has been able to turn what might have been a disaster in Haiti into a public-relations plus for the Administration - at least for the moment. General Raoul Cedras has been toppled and exiled to Panama; President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has been returned to Port-au-Prince; US soldiers have not been seriously harmed. The fact that the invasion has not solved the endemic problems of Haiti and that the opposition forces have simply gone to ground is not relevant to the US election campaign. In other overseas trouble spots such as Bosnia, Mr Clinton is benefiting from his commendable reluctance to commit ground troops to the conflict. In fact, with Muslim cooperation, he has been able to neutralise the war as an issue. Most Americans don't see it as an appropriate theatre for intervention beyond the clinical use of air power through Nato to punish the Serbs when their aggression becomes offensive to the sensibilities of evening television news viewers. With these foreign-policy successes, it might have been expected that Mr Clinton would develop passable coat tails for his fellow Democrats to grasp in their election campaigns. But this is not the case. Mr Clinton has not been inundated with requests to support candidates. On the contrary, with one major exception, he has eitther been ignored or his policies treated with great selectivity. For while Mr Clinton's presidency was seen initially as being almost wholly concerned with domestic issues the foreign policy elements being an acknowledged weakness it is clear that internal issues do not add strength to his electoral standing. Most recently, the public-health proposals to which his wife, Hillary Clinton, had devoted her energies and her husband his prestige collapsed in ignominious failure on Capitol Hill. It revealed a White House that had been severely weakened by earlier battles on the Budget and, most significantly, gun-control legislation. The latter was a small victory for Mr Clinton but it came at too high a price. , He called-in too many debts to have sufficient political credit remaining to force health reform through Congress. The major exception comes in the form of Senator Ted Kennedy, a bloated and decaying figure, but a link to that era when Mr Clinton discovered the psychological rewards offered by a political career. For more than 30 years Senator Kennedy has held the Mas- sachusetts seat, having inherited it from his brother John who brought it into the family in 1952. Senator Kennedy is being challenged by another name from that era, Mitt Romney, and has been campaigning hard. Massachusetts is Democrat country, the only state which remained in George McGovern's list in the disastrous 1972 campaign against an incumbent Republican Richard Nixon. If it should fall to the Republicans there is a likelihood that for the first time since 1954 the Democrats will lose control of both the House of Representatives and the Senate. If that occurs, there will be almost no chance of Mr Clinton's securing passage of a legislative program that would lay a positive foundation for his own re-election. He would have become a victim of the standard presidential strategy. His options would be reduced to running against an obstructionist Congress or finding another Saddam Hussein.
  68. 1994-10-26 Article 118294014, score 9.203863 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOY HESTER,   BERNARD SMITH,   IVOR HELE,   ALEXANDER DOWNER,   ALEX BY CASSIE PROUDFOOT,   CLIFTON PUGH,   GEOFF PRIOR,   JULIA CLARK,   WALTER BURLEY GRIFFIN,   JIMMY BARNES,   AUGUSTUS EARLE,   EDNA RYAN,   LEO SCHOFIELD,   LIONEL MURPHY,   ALBERT TUCKER
    Organisations NATIONAL LIBRARY,   OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE
    Locations PORTRAIT GALLERY,   CANBERRA,   NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY
    Misc ABORIGINAL,   LIBERAL,   SOCIAL HISTORY,   AUSTRALIAN
    Family matters and the young Alex By CASSIE PROUDFOOT THE STAFF of the National Portrait Gallery situated in Old Parliament House have just finished hanging their second exhibition All in the Family. Considering it is only a matter of months since their last impressive exhibition opened, this is a monumental achievement. The exhibition contains a wealth of images which range from the very early, such as photographic records of tribal Aboriginal families, and sumptuous early colonial family portrait paintings to the contemporary, including Albert Tucker's 1985 portrait of Bernard Smith and a 1992 photograph of Jimmy Barnes and his family. Curator Julia Clark has spent most of her working life in museums dealing with artefacts, and had limited previous experience with exhibiting paintings. The National Library, which runs the Portrait Gallery are also new to hanging major visual art ex- hibitions. This unfamiliarity with the vast amount of work required to plan, collate, curate and hang a comprehensive exhibition may have contributed to the Portrait Gallery's ambitious commitment to open an entirely new exhibition every three months. However, while the staff may be running themselves ragged behind the scenes, the gallery-going public are being treated to a feast of wonderful ex- hibitions. All in the Family is filled with captivating portraits, each with its own fascinating story to tell. Many of the portraits arc of great artistic merit, including Albert Tucker's canvasses, whose subjects seem to almost leap from the canvas, Joy Hester's self portrait, Clifton Pugh's Lionel Murphy and Augustus Earle's portraits of the Piper family. Many John and Sunday Reed, oil on canvas, by Albert Tucker 1982. others, while also visually arresting are even more interesting once the story of the sitters is known. The inclusion of the details of the lives of the people featured in the portraits, rather than extensive art historical comment, gives the paintings relevence to a wide audience. Clark, whose own background has been in Social History and Anthropol- ogy, explains; the National Library didn't want the National Portrait Gallery to be an Art Gallery. They wanted it to be much more interesting in broad historical themes. A lot of Australian history is on display in All in the Family. Important political families arc represented, famous sporting families, lesbian families, immigrant families, colonial families, political families and artistic families. There is a treat for Liberal followers in the portrait group comprising several generations of the Downer family. Even those who aren't fond of Alexander Downer will be hard put to resist Ivor Hele's captivating representation of him as a child. A photographic portrait of Marion and Walter Burley Griffin is situated on the back wall. Walter looks straight out towards the viewer (and through the window, at the impressive vista his vision for a city has become). Marion, as befitted a woman of that era, stands a little to the side gazing demurely downward. Upon reading the caption for the picture, the viewer realises with a shock that Marion entered the competition for Canberra jointly with her husband, was the most famous draftsperson of her day and ran their joint business because Walter wasn't business-minded. Julia Clark believes that portraits such as this need to be approached and deconstructed in the same way as a historical document. Several under-valued Australian women are represented in All in the Family. Apart from those who made significant political and public achievements, there are numerous mothers . As it turned out, said Clark, the more I looked into successful families, the more it seemed that the mother was the most basic source of the children's success, rather than educational programs or anything the government or society might have done. I believe that really emphasises the importance of the family unit to society. Edna Ryan, famous for achieving equal pay for women in 1974, stands indomitable at nearly 90 years of age in her portrait by Geoff Prior. Edna gained the minimum wage for women by countering the widely held belief that men supported families and thus rightly earned higher wages with some sensational statistics. By proving that 130,000 Australian families depended solely on a woman's income for survival, Ryan successfully demonstrated the need for equal wages for women. Ryan was spurred on in her quest to achieve equal pay for women by the memories of her own childhood. Clark has spent the past four months preparing this exhibition, and she is fall of anecdotes about the people in the portraits she has chosen to include. She took pains to find works which are lovely, and which have additional qualities in terms of portraiture and aesthetics. I also wanted to move away from the obvious. With almost every image I want people to think what is a portrait? does it have to be formal? does it have to be posed? Take your family snap is that a portrait? These are the issues I am particularly interested in. Clark's preoccupation with finding interesting and representative families for All in the Family, rather than just society portraits, has led to an exhibition which is particularly aceessable for the viewer. After all. as Clark puts it, everybody has a family. The show has enough images which fall into the category of high art to satisfy the true art lover, while also containing photographs of the Chappel brothers (whose father had them learning cricket almost before they could walk,) and a touching portrait of critic Leo Schofield and his mother. All in the Family is an eclectic collection of images including society portraits, damaged old family photos, colonial painting and modern photography. Like many of the unconventional families represented in the exhibition, the pieces are put together in an unlikely combination, but it works. All in the Family continues until February 5.
  69. 1994-02-19 Article 134303047, score 9.180686 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MALCOLM TURNBULL,   SURI RATNAPALA,   GOUGH WHITLAM,   WOLFGANG KASPER,   MALCOLM TUMBULL,   GEOFFREY DE Q WALKER,   WILLIAM HEINE MANN,   MICHAEL KIRBY,   HARRY EVANS,   JOHN GRAHAM
    Organisations REPUBLIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE,   REPUBLICAN MOVEMENT,   AUSTRALIANS FOR CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY,   FEDERAL PARLIAMENT,   SENATE,   PARLIAMENT
    Locations AUSTRALIA,   TRUE REPUBLIC,   AUSTRA
    Misc AUSTRALIANS,   REPUBLICAN,   AMERICAN
    Key strands in the republican debate THE RELUCTANT REPUBLIC. By Malcolm Turnbull. William Heine mann. 358dd. 19.95. RESTORING THE TRUE REPUBLIC. By Geoffrey de Q Walker, Suri Rat napala and Wolfgang Kasper. Cen tre for Independent Studies. 74pp. tinns. Reviewer: JOHN GRAHAM. THE MOST ardent advocates of a republican Australia take a pretty simplistic view of the procedures for reform. It's time, they say like Gough Whitlam in 1972, and lay down a program of implementation that assumes the rest of Australia is with them. Malcolm Tumbull and his Aus tralian Republican Movement think themselves too wily to follow that narrow path. The cause of the republic will not be won without struggle, he says in the final chap ter of his survey of the debate, and he acknowledges the difficulty of changing the constitution without bipartisan support. For that very practical reason the ARM stands squarely on the con servative side of the debate. It pro poses simply that the Queen and the Governor-General be replaced by a President, be elected by an absolute majority vote in both houses of Parliament and have the same duties and functions as the Governor-General. Tumbull, however, quits that simplicity when he inserts what he tries to portray as a little embel lishment, but which turns into a major diversion. His argument for a full codification of the powers of the president comes from the Republic Advisory Committee of which he is also the chairman and involves a lengthy statement setting them out. He begins with an index of those powers, follows with a description of the method of appointing and dismissing the Prime Minister and finishes with a detailed statement about the inability of the President to dissolve Parliament on the ad vice of a Prime Minister who does not have its majority support. He then moves through the rest of the 128 clauses deleting references to the Queen and the Governor-Gen eral and taking out obsolete refer ences. The result is a document that is unexceptional in its intention, but daunting in its presentation. It is full of excisions and its additions . look forbidding, giving the impres sion of a radically changed consti tution. Justice Michael Kirby, the most persuasive of the Australians for Constitutional Monarchy, has pointed to the formidable problem that major changes present. Of the 63 constitutional amendments that have been put since federation, only 12 have passed. Even those that have bipartisan support and receive a majority of the popular vote can fail because they do not have the support of more than half the states. The 1977 proposition for simultaneous elec tions was supported by all parties and received 62 per cent popular support, but it still failed on the state count. Tumbull professes to appreciate these practical difficulties, but the amended constitution at the end.of his book shows the presentational problems that even the minimalist approach brings. So how do you persuade the peo ple to accept a change that they may want in principle, but from which they may well shy away when they realise the implications of spelling out the powers of the head of state? Turnbull's overall strategy is to turn the republican cause into a mass movement. We must dem onstrate that our cause springs from the people, he says. Just as the move to federation foundered in the hands of politicians and was rescued by thousands of Austral ians in citizens' movements, so too must the people carry the republi can goal to its completion. That is, in part, a return to the popular sovereignty concept that swept the American founding fa thers along, but the ideological has sles it could unleash are illustrated in Restoring the True Republic. Its authors are all republicans, but they are as critical of what they call the minimalist position of the ARM as they arc of the no-change monarchists. Harry Evans, Clerk of the Senate, puts their position in stark, if simplistic, terms in his in troduction. We have drifted into a system of government whereby we choose a party to govern for three years, and entrust the leaders of that party with virtually unlimited pow ers. This is absolutely contrary to the theory and practice of republi can government. Its three authors Geoffrey dc Q Walker, Suri Ratnapala and Wolfgang Kasper, mount a frontal attack on centralised taxing power, what they call judge-made law and the granting of quasi-judicial rights to administrative agencies. Their recommended solutions to return taxing power to the slates, to reform Federal Parliament and reduce the domination of the minis try, and to introduce citizen-initiat ed referendums constitute just the issues that Turnbull and the ARM want to avoid. He wants to concentrate on the identity of the head of the state, which he sees as the practical path to republicanism: If the republican bandwagon is overladen with other issues the axles will break and the wheels will fall off. The problem is that they may well break if the other issues arc shunted aside and left to be devel oped by those outside the main stream republican movement. Turnbull has mounted a powerful argument for treating the switch to a republic as a technical matter, quite separate from more funda mental questions about the future shape of republicanism in Austra lia, but it will take considerable po litical dexterity to keep it that way. As his own text shows, changing the constitution is not a simple matter under any circumstances. These two books demonstrate sharply and authoritatively the two main strands in the republican de bate. They provide together a good start for those who have an instinct ive feel for the need to change, but who want to become belter in formed about the republican de bate.
  70. 1994-09-01 Article 118135044, score 9.171627 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People GEORGE BUSH,   ANDREW ZIOLKOWSKI,   GABRIELLE HARRISON,   NICK GREINER,   NEVILLE WRAN,   BOB CARR,   JOHN FAHEY,   BROKEN HILL,   RONALD REAGAN
    Organisations PARLIAMENT FOR LABOR,   LABOR,   LIBERAL PARTY,   LOWER HOUSE,   LABOR PARTY,   NATIONAL PARTY,   NSW CONSERVATIVE LABOR,   NSW LABOR,   NSW PRESS GALLERY
    Locations NEW SOUTH WALES,   GOULBURN,   PARRAMATTA,   QUEENSLAND,   SYDNEY,   NEWCASTLE,   SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS,   CANADA,   BLUE MOUNTAINS,   UPPER HOUSE,   BADGERYS CREEK,   UNITED STATES,   CAMDEN,   WOLLONGONG
    Misc AMERICANS,   OLYMPIC GAMES,   NSW,   IRAQIS,   OLYMPICS,   ANTI-LABOR,   BULLETIN,   LIBERALS,   ROMAN,   AUSTRALIAN
    Labor is taking a winning Carr trip MANY political analysts write off Bob Carr. True, he's a nice bloke. Brainy, funny and savvy in a sort of donnish way, too. Solid as a rock on policy (or the comfortable NSW Conservative Labor variety). Good with the numbers, and knows his way around the party back rooms and corridors like a weather-scarred tour guide. But Premier Carr? A thoughtful, slightly regretful, shaking of the head usually follows. Just can't imagine it. NSW voters just won't buy it. Doesn't come over well on the box it's his looks, you know. Pity really. This surprisingly widespread view in NSW and national political circles has been seriously challenged by events over last week end in Sydney's sprawling western suburbs. As the Commonwealth Games were winding up in Canada and the nation was basking in the sporting prowess of its youth, the seat of Parramatta was retained in a by-election by Labor with a 9.6 per cent swing against the Government. By-elections are always perilous for governments and tend to exaggerate the level of disgruntle- ment shown by voters to incumbent administrations. Sometimes the slap across the wrist proves to be an electoral aberration. At other times, the result represents the writing on the wall. Parramatta is increasingly looking like just such an ominous warning to Liberal Premier John Fahey. Parramatta always should have been a safe Labor seat. But demographic change which has seen the steady gentrification of Sydney's west, and the impact of electoral redistribution, had converted it into a soft marginal for Labor. It was held by the young (30) Labor MP Andrew Ziolkowski until April this year, when he died of cancer. His sickness was no secret in NSW political circles, an important fact when one considers how long it took the Liberals to come up with an acceptable candidate. Labor took the plunge and backed Ziolkowski's widow, Gabrielle Harrison, to stand. Harrison has her own impeccable Labor credentials, being the daughter and sister of the Harrison political and union family, one of the dozen or so NSW Labor dynasties that flourish like the patrician families of classical Roman times. It was a risk, but an acceptable one. Bob Carr was up to his un- telegenic ears in the strategy. Carr has a pretty good idea of his strengths and his weaknesses. Where possible, he prefers to communicate to the public through the medium of radio, on which he has no peer in NSW, or even perhaps Australian, political life. He works the NSW Press Gallery hard (he was formerly a respected political and industrial relations journalist with The Bulletin) but tries to keep off TV. What the Liberals are now realising is that he shares another trait with his fellow hard-heads in the NSW political machine: he is very good on numbers and is converting that into a deliberate political strategy of targeting marginal seats that need to fall to Labor for him to become Premier. It is reminiscent of Prime Minister Heating's highly selective targeting of a handful of crucial marginal seats, and the issues that dominated the middle-ground electorates, during the 1993 federal election. Some Labor Party players with longer memories look to a similar tactical play by Neville Wran when he wrested power from the Liberals in 1976. Since John Fahey governs with a majority of one in the state's Lower House, and the Liberals and their fellow National Party conservatives are in a minority in the Upper House, the margins are razor thin. Fahey's fear is that his fate might mimic that of US President George Bush who went into the 1992 presidential elections with the apparently unbeatable advantage of having run a relatively quick, antiseptic and successful war against the hapless Iraqis. He had originally inherited the mantle from the indolent political ingenue Ronald Reagan, riding on the fraying coattails of the ageing President's feel-good reputation. BUSH should have won, but didn't. Having won the war, Americans seemed not to trust him to manage the peace. Fahey has inherited his premiership from the impressive, if flawed, political figure of Nick Greiner. He has had his own Desert Storm in the shape of a successful campaign to secure the staging of the Olympic Games in Sydney in 2000, complete with a highly publicised leap of joy which seemed to capture the mood of much of NSW at the time. He was also on hand to shield Prince Charles in spectacular fashion during a gun incident in Sydney not long afterwards. Fahey has a tough hide and a good political brain which belies his somewhat bucolic and avuncular appearance. But his weakness is to be surrounded by a party machine which looks amateurish by comparison with Labor's. Mind you, it is not much better at the national level for the Liberals as the string of federal political defeats over the past decade testifies. What the Parramatta by-election result has demonstrated is that the Liberals have no viable tactical skills in dealing with key marginal seats. In contrast, Carr has been strenuously working the marginals electorates like Maitland on the suburban fringes of Newcastle, and the commuter seats on Sydney's outskirts like Camden to the south and Blue Mountains to the west. Add in several, others where the Government holds seats by slim margins Gladesville, Badgerys Creek and even the Southern Highlands seat held by Fahey himself and the possibility of success for Carr is becoming increasingly evident. Bob Carr (above) and John Fahey: it's a battle between two canny politicians but the would-be Premier Carr has sniffed the sweet smell of success. Fahey's personal popularity means he is almost certainly going to hold his own seat and it is axiomatic that Carr needs to watch Labor's own marginal seats to ensure its own heartland doesn't drift as it did in the late 1980s. But it is the Government which has its back to the wall. In politics, a fright like Parramatta is sometimes the catalyst for a major realignment of strategy. But the Liberal Party structure shows no signs yet of being able to cope with the tough-minded plays which Labor is likely to use to regain control of NSW. With fixed four-year terms in the state, the election date is set in stone March next year, meaning that Fahey and Carr have less than seven months to go before they face the music. On paper, NSW should be a traditional Labor state. The industrial and poorer suburbs of Sydney, the sprawling perimeter commuter belt suburbs, the industrial regional cities like Wollongong, Newcastle, Lithgow and Broken Hill, and the large old railway towns like Goulburn and Wagga should provide a solid half of the seats in Parliament for Labor. Historically that has been the case. Demographic change, as well as the gentrification of the Labor Party itself, has changed the recipe somewhat but NSW is more likely than not to field a Labor administration. Which means that, Olympics notwithstanding, it would be a serious error of judgment to write off a Premier Carr. Such an outcome would have wider ramifications than just in NSW. At present at the state level, Labor is in power only in Queensland. If, by March, Labor holds both of the two populous northern states, it would be a major turning of the anti-Labor tide which swept administration after administration from office in the latter part of the 1980s and early 1990s. It would be a galling experience for the Liberals and their National Party cousins, coming on top of the federal shenanigans. But it could just happen, out there in the marginal seats where would-be Premier Carr is spending an inordinate amount of time.
  71. 1994-09-22 Article 118139382, score 9.161161 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALEXAN DER RUTSKOI,   GENNA DY ZUGANOV,   YURI LUZKHOV,   BILL CLINTON,   VLADIMIR ZHIRINOV,   JOHN MAJOR,   DAVID HEARST,   BORIS YELTSIN
    Organisations KREMLIN,   LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY,   COMMUNIST PARTY,   PARLIAMENT,   AGRARIAN PARTY
    Locations KALININGRAD,   BRITAIN,   RUSSIA,   BERLIN,   MOSCOW,   NEW YORK,   BOSNIA,   GERMANY
    Misc GROUP OF,   RUSSIAN,   BRITISH
    Embattled Yeltsin losing support The idea is gaining ground that Russia needs a steadier guiding hand, reports DAVID HEARST in Moscow. PRESIDENT Boris Yeltsin trav els to Britain this week to meet John Major, the British Prime Minister, leaving behind him a deteriorating Russian economy and growing political opposition. The op position comes both from within his own camp and from his increasingly confident opponents. Many people within his adminis , tration are questioning whether or ' not Mr Yeltsin should go to the country in presidential elections next year arid are speculating about which politician could mount a cred ible attempt to oppose him. After his British visit Mr Yeltsin travels on to New York and Wash ihgton for meetings with President Bill Clinton and discussions on a range of other looming problems from Bosnia to aid to Russia from the Group of Seven leading industri al countries. His natural political allies, the rad ical democrat reformers of Russia's Choice, have lost the confidence of the nation and are now hopelessly split in a weak Parliament. Mean while, Mr Yeltsin's advisers are di vided as to what policy he should pursue. Economic indicators are also far from promising. Industrial output continues to fall, and there are signs that inflation will start rising again from its current low of 4 per cent a month. So desperate has the situation be come that media reports claim he will make a televised address to the nation today, although Mr Yeltsin's office would neither confirm nor de ny this. While Mr Yeltsin is still consid ered a resolute and natural leader in .a time of crisis and open confronta tion, the idea is gaining ground that Russia needs a steady hand, that can cope with the day-to-day minutiae of reform. This is especially the case after his visit to Germany last month, where he took part in a .farewell ceremony for the last Russian troops leaving the country after 50 years. His erratic behaviour prompted caustic press comment. Russian tele vision showed him stumbling on the steps of Berlin city hall and stagger ing after a champagne lunch. His conduct sparked unusual comments in Russian newspapers normally sup portive of the Kremlin leader. The most serious challenge to his authority does not come from the ex treme nationalist Vladimir Zhirinov sky, leader of the Liberal Democratic Party. But if a middle-ground candi date emerged, capable of winning the confidence of the ruling elite of new and old nomenklatura bosses, and the army, an election would have quite a different tenor. One of the most prominent poten tial contenders to have emerged is the Mayor of Moscow, Yuri Luzkhov, who is immensely popular in the capital, although he has always de scribed himself as a team player and loyal to the President. In contrast to Mr Yeltsin's image of Mr Absent , Mr Luzkhov is at present running a hectic schedule of engagements which makes him ap pear as Mr Present . Mr Luzkhov is, however, still far from being known in the provinces, although he conducts the Moscow government like a state within a state. Meanwhile, the radical opposition, a broad and uneasy coalition of ex treme nationalists, hard-line commu nists, and politicians such as Genna dy Zuganov, the Communist Party head who is closer to being a social democrat, have yet to announce a joint candidate to oppose Mr Yeltsin. They met in a session closed to jour nalists in Kaliningrad last Friday. Neither of the two main opposition blocks in Parliament, the Liberal Democratic Party or the Agrarian Party attended, and without them, the electoral position of the radical opposition is weak. The former Vice-President, Alexan der Rutskoi, who led the last Parlia ment's ill-fated and bloody attempts to resist closure, has pledged to form an opposition governnment, ready to take power. Tha Guardian
  72. 1994-05-28 Article 118214481, score 9.119175 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MARTIN WOOLLACOTT,   JEROME K. JEROME,   TIM BELL,   ERIC HOBSBAWMVI,   JOHN MAJOR,   DAVID CAUTC,   WILLIAM TELL
    Organisations INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE,   HAPSBURGS,   BELGIAN ARMY,   HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT,   SAIGON
    Locations COLUMBUS,   ATLANTIC COMMUNITY,   TIANAN,   TIANANMEN,   NORMANDY,   MARS,   NEW SPAIN,   EUROPE,   WATERLOO,   BERLIN WALL,   GERMANY
    Misc CHINESE,   FRENCH,   BELGIAN,   POST-SOVIET,   TORY,   FRANCO-PRUS SIAN,   SWISS,   BASTILLE,   PRUSSIANS,   ENGLISH,   FRENCH REVOLUTION,   SEDAN,   AMERICAN,   WORLD WAR II
    Lives measured by anniversaries News of the past begins, sometimes, to rival the news of the present for our attention, writes MARTIN WOOLLACOTT. The anniversary phenomenon is becoming almost pathological. Everywhere one looks, another anniversary or half-centenary is swelling like a young boil, awaiting the lance of controver sy or the poultice of celebration before subsiding. We seem to be measuring out our lives by these affairs. The French Revolution, Colum bus, Kennedy's assassination and now, of course, D-Day those are just a few of the more prominent of these history festivals over the past few years. Next year, even more World War II commemorations. Meanwhile, the new anniversa ries of the post-Soviet era the fall of the Berlin Wall, Tiananmen, the Gorbachev coup are already rolling along, provoking fresh flur ries. Only a few years beyond lies the millennium itself, the focus of fun damentalist speculation and a mo ment with unavoidable weight even for the least religious. An observer from Mars might say we are in the grip of numerological beliefs as odd as those which influ enced the ancient Chinese. If the habit of assigning significance to particular numbers or particular blocks of years has any justifica tion, it is provided by generational length, and even that is dubious. But we persist in, or we continue to find useful, the idea that because an event occurrcd some multiple of 10 years ago it now deserves some spe cial attention, celebration, reinter pretation or action. Indeed, such anniversaries have a power to generate a chain of events: the most notable recent example was Tiananmen, where the students had gathered in 1989 in commemo ration of the 70th anniversary of the Student Movement. Without the marker of the earlier event, Tianan men, could not have happened as or when it did. News of the past begins, some times, to rival news of the present. There arc days when the mingling of the two in newspapers and televi sion leads to a certain chronological muzziness. Are we in 1944 or 1994, in 1492 or 1992? Is Columbus land ing in New Spain, or the Hampshire Regiment in Normandy? The typical story of a modern an niversary is that it is proposed and organised by governments with the intention of dispelling uncertainties, renewing national feeling and evok ing a mood of national or even in ternational unity. It then goes wrong. Sometimes it is attacked by those who deem it unhistorical, as when 700 years of Swiss indepen dence, celebrated solemnly in 1991, was followed by the revelation that not only was there no apple, no William Tell and no revolt against the Hapsburgs, but also that Swit zerland essentially became independent because nobody could be bothered with it. Sometimes those most concerned, as with the D-Day veterans, resent the manipulation, as they see it, by politicians. At the least the event will be turned inside out for alterna tive meanings. The time when we took the past more or less for granted is over. In stead it is riffed and re-riffed for clues to the future, and every anni versary or prominent death is the occasion for re-examination. The International Herald Tribune, for example, has hung a massive se ries of articles about the future of the Atlantic Community around the neck of D-Day. Competition mean while, leads to earlier and earlier anticipation of the event. In the case of the fall of Saigon 20 years ago next year American reporters have been back 12 months early writing something suspiciously like 20th-anniversary stories, stories which speak of inner perplexity about a war that was so improbable it could not have happened, except that it did. The thing is commercially driven to some extent shaped by the same forces that give us more and more historical theme parks, more period films, more retrospectives and revivals. Businessmen and politicians arc aware of the fear of the future and how the past, even the radical, dis scnting, past can be marketed as re assurance. David Cautc, in his book on the 20th anniversary of the events of 1968, complained of this continual cultural neutering of dis sent, the eclecticism which treats all ideas as short-lived merchandise . But anniversaries are part of a genuinely more intense preoccupa tion with the past since Gorbachev turned our world upside down. He cause most of them have powerful national signiiicance, they arc also central to the arguments about na tional identity which have grown sharper since those days. In adver sity nations look for the templates which enabled them to weather trou ble in the past. John Major's attempted appropri ation of the D-Day celebrations fs of a piece with his party's dilemmas over Europe and over social policy. What Mr Major and media adviser Tim Bell tried to do was to invent a tradition (in Eric HobsbawmVi phrase , to put in place a piece Of national ritual and to stamp it with a Tory mark. As D-Day approaches, it is salfl tary to be reminded that the past is not only about battlefields but also a battlefield itself. Anniversaries are a commercialised and politicised form of historical debate, which in turn is a debate about identity. We have lost our innoccnce in. these matters, which makes the debate more difficult, and even more neces sary. A century or so ago, the French were inventing Bastille Day, and the Prussians were transforming the anniversary of the Franco-Prus sian war into a series of ceremonies intended to unite the new Germany. Bastille Day survived; Sedan Day did not. Whether D-Day will go on much beyond the natural span of those who fought there is a question about Europe and Germany that cannot yet be answered. Battles mean different things to different nations, even among allies, let alone former enemies. A wonderful lesson in perspective is recorded by Jerome K. Jerome jn his autobiography, when his Belgian guide laid out the itinerary for a visit to Waterloo. Wc would be shown the Belgian Lion, Jerome writes, oil a pyra mid, proudly overlooking the field, and would learn how, on the 18th of June, 1815, the French were there defeated by the Belgian Army, as cictotl K., (I,n r. rm..n or,,! c/. u English. The Giw'd'un
  73. 1994-07-02 Article 118188163, score 9.11038 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ICH BIN EIN BERLINER,   EDWARD M. KENNEDY,   THEODORE WHITE,   ROBERT F. KENNEDY,   SAM GIANCANA,   JOHN KENNEDY,   JOE MCGINNISS,   ANDREW KIDD FRASER,   TEDDY KENNEDY,   JOHN F. KENNEDY
    Organisations SENATE,   US SENATE
    Locations WHITE HOUSE,   LOS ANGELES,   BERLIN,   MOSCOW,   CAMELOT,   WASHINGTON,   UNITED STATES
    Misc AMERICANS,   CUBAN,   AMERICAN,   CAMELOT
    Getting inside Teddy's head THE LAST BROTHER. The Rise and Fall of Teddy Kennedy. By Joe McGinniss. Little, Brown and Company. 623pp. 35. Reviewer: ANDREW KIDD FRASER. IN THE 1960s and '70s, the Americans, with their flair for promotion and their serious need to believe, created an entire myth, called for want of a better shorthand, Camelot. The myth centred on the Kennedy family, impossibly handsome, inspiring, and above all, destined to win. In all, there were nine children, four boys and five girls. Two of them Joe and Kathleen died in airplane crashes before they reached mature adulthood, but for a brief time there were three of them in power in Washington. In the 11 months after the 1962 Senate elections, John F. Kennedy, or Jack, was president; Robert F. Kennedy, or Bobby, was Attorney-General; and Edward M. Kennedy, or Teddy, was the youngest member of the United States Senate. The Camelot myth was given eternal life by historian Theodore White, who called it a magic moment in American history, when gallant men danced with beautiful women, when great deeds were done, when artists, writers and poets met at the White House, and the barbarians behind the walls were held back. Well, as they say stateside, then was then, now is now. The '80s and '90s have seen the death of Camelot. The myth being created now is that nothing like Camelot ever took place, and what fools they all were to believe it. This, is the super-real '90s, bro, not the dreamtime of the '60s. Far from a golden age, it was a time of comely moral charlatans who charmed their way to the leadership of the most powerful country on earth, only to jettison its best interests when their ambitious dad called on them to do so. Their sheer confidence and arrogance let them get away with follies for which other mortals were held re- sponsible. This is a book of the 1990s, and as such, a shining example of the latter category. As portrayed by Joe McGinniss, Teddy Kennedy is a vain drunk with a wandering eye who acts consistently out of self-interest. He's a nice guy, sure, and means well, and the pressures on him are immense, but he's basically a moral weakling who caves in at the first sign of pressure. The main problem with the book is the vast amount of supposed factual evidence which is, to put it mildly, questionable. For example, when the Cuban crisis was on in 1962, McGinniss proclaims that In Moscow . . . Khruschev was displaying far more prudence and sense of proportion than Jack . Really? How did he know? Whatever Jack's failings, prudence and a sense of proportion weren't exactly qualities that Khruschev displayed abundantly. There also a fly-on-the-wall account of a meeting between John Kennedy and Sam Giancana, a mobster of the time. At this meeting, again according tc McGinniss, Giancana was not a happy man . . . (he) didn't like this talk about Bobby's highest priority as Attorney-General being the break-up of organised crime. It had to stop. Right away. Note the tone. It's all presented as undisputable fact, when clearly he's making it up. An inspired guess, yes but a guess none, the less. The lack of an index not to mention footnotes is also disquieting. When authors make as many outrageous statements as McGinniss does, you want to be able to check them. The book also has far too short a time frame. Granted, a lot of the action in Teddy Kennedy's life was in the 1960s. But he also had a substantive career after that he was, after all, a presidential candidate of sorts in both 1976 and 1980. And he is still a member of the US Senate, a gathering that bills itself as the world's greatest, deliberative body . But there's virtually nothing in this book after the '60s. In fact, there are only eight pages between the end of the '60s and the end of the book. In short, its not to be believed as a work of history. It's a shame because where it does have some value is in portraying the sort of pressures that Teddy Kennedy was under. To use the parlance of the '60s in which most of the book is set, it attempts to get inside Teddy's head. And it does this best when recalling facts. After Bobby is shot, Teddy is devastated. His two older brothers, carrying the hopes of a generation, have been violently murdered in public. Yet even before he left the Los Angeles hospital where Bobby had just died, he was confronted by an emotional man who said, You've got to take the leadership! Now that Bobby's gone, you're all we've got! It's a sort of pressure very few people could cope with, Kennedy training or not. The trouble with the destroyers of the Camelot myth is that the history they are rewriting is as flawed as the original myth. As that time recedes, what's discounted in the Kennedy era is the way they excited people. Not just the Americans, but people all around the world. John F. Kennedy's famous speech in Berlin when he pronounced 'Ich bin ein Berliner was delivered to more than a million people. Who would pull that kind of a crowd today? Clinton? Major? Yeltsin? Hardly. It's time to stop debunking the myth of Camelot that's been well and truly done, and honest history is the better for it. But this book suffers too greatly from the same moral failures of which it accuses the Kennedys, to have much credibility.
  74. 1994-05-06 Article 118209800, score 9.103192 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MIKE TAYLOR,   JOHN MURRAY,   IAN DAVIS,   PETER COOK,   BERT EVANS,   PAUL KEATING,   BOB COLLINS,   BOB MCMULLAN
    Organisations PRESS CLUB,   ABC,   CHAMBER OF MANUFACTURES OF NSW,   DE PARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT,   CANBERRA TIMES,   VICTORIAN EMPLOY ERS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY,   MTIA,   DEET,   METAL TRADES INDUSTRY ASSOCIA,   NATIONAL PRESS CLUB,   PRI MARY INDUSTRIES AND ENERGY,   MASTER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION,   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    Locations CANBERRA,   AUSTRALIA,   DARWIN
    Misc POST-WHITE PAPER,   ECONTECH,   BUD,   WORKING NATION WHITE PAPER,   DEET
    A fast diet of fruit and politics At the post-White Paper break fast at the National Press Club yesterday, the Minister for Pri mary Industries and Energy, Bob Collins,' was introduced to his audi ence as a well-rounded minister. Mr Collins patted his ample girth and agreed, even though his presenter was referring to the Min ister's wide experience in politics. The Minister and the guests would have discovered the Press Club is a great place for breakfast for anyone wanting to lose weight. Yesterday's fare was sliced fruit, tea, coffee, tiny rolls, and jam. The fruit did not last long among an audience expecting sausages, eggs and bacon and, as they left, some guests were heard muttering that they were off to get some breakfast. They wondered if Mr Collins had headed back to the Members Dining Room in Parlia ment House which provides a full breakfast for politicians. Bob Collins said he was the right person to talk about the re gional development aspects of the White Paper because he had lived in the regions for 30 years, grown vegetables near Darwin, worked in the buffalo industry and as an ag ricultural extension officer. The Minister said the White Pa per contained a sensible blueprint to promote regions as centres of export activity. He also welcomed changes to the Rural Assistance Scheme that will allow funds to be directed to projects benefitting farming communities as a whole, likp thn l.nnH pnrp crhpmf - TOM CONNORS Picture: GRAHAM TIDY A well-rourided Bob Collins at the Press Club yesterday Bosses warm to role as job compact brokers . By MIKE TAYLOR, National Affairs Writer Australia's major employer and industry groups have confirmed their interest in acting as job bro kers as part of the Federal Gov ernment's Jobs Compact. The Prime Minister, Paul Keating, yesterday nominated the Metal Trades Industry Associa tion as accepting the role of jobs broker and the MTIA's executive director, Bert Evans, yesterday confirmed his organisation's inter est in such a proposition. Under the jobs brokerage ini tiative, peak employer and indus try bodies such as the MTIA, the Chamber of Manufactures of NSW and the Victorian Employ ers Chamber of Commerce and Industry will act as intermediaries in locating jobs and training places amongst their members for the long-term unemployed. Commenting on the fact that the Prime Minister had nominat ed the MTIA as an organisation which would take on a brokerage role, Mr Evans said yesterday that his organisation was, howev er, being realistic about what could be achieved. We are not pretending for a moment that it will be easy, Mr Evans told The Canberra Times. It is one thing for us to take on a brokerage role, it is another think entirely to convince our members to cooperate. But we have given the Gov ernment a commitment to seek to provide jobs and training places and we will do everything we can to live up to that commitment, Mr Evans said. However the Master Builders Association is taking a much more cautious approach to the brokerage role, with the MBA's national director, John Murray, saying his organisation would be analysing the implications be fore making any commitment. The MBA first wanted to de termine how the Government's new package bedded down' with the association's existing build-a job scheme and where the trade unions stood on the issue. DEET job programs do work: study By IAN DAVIS, Finance Editor Preliminary studies by the De partment of Employment, Educa tion and Training show previous ly unemployed people who have undertaken training or subsidised employment through the Govern ment's labour market programs have much higher levels of em ployment success than previously believed. The centrepiece of the Govern ment's Working Nation White Paper was the massive expansion of places in labour market pro grams over the next four years. Previously unpublished infor mation from DEET's own moni toring of existing programs dur ing 1992-93 shows a much higher proportion of those who had passed through most labour mar ket programs were in unsubsi dised employment when moni tored six to eight months after completing the programs than re vealed by other monitoring car ried out three months after par ticipants had completed programs. According to a DEET official, the rise in the numbers in unsub sidised ( real ) jobs after six to eight months compared to after three months suggests that those who have undertaken the labour market programs have a much better chance of finding real jobs than previously believed. The rise in the later monitoring period may indicate that many of those who lose their jobs once the Government subsidy to em ployers cuts out are finding jobs three to six months later. Trade roles 'agreed' The Minister for Trade, Bob McMullan, has strongly denied he was undermined by initiatives announced in the White Paper. Senator McMullan was over shadowed by the Minister for In dustry, Science and Technology, Peter Cook, who announced some of the major trade initia tives in the Paper. On ABC radio yesterday Sena tor McMullan slammed The Can berra Times coverage of Senator Cook's press briefing and denied that Senator Cook had dominat ed trade issues. It really is amateur hour jour nalism they [The Canberra Times] have got it wrong. It is agreed on the basis of a paper which I put forward. So it is no way it is not a victory for me but it is not a victory for Pe ter, it is an agreement between people with a common purposes. After repeated requests for an interview, a spokeswoman for Senator McMullan said last night he had said all he wanted to say on the subject and was now keen to get on with the job . - IAN McPHEDRAN Economy to decline, say forecasters Private economics' forecasters claimed yesterday that Austra lia's economic growth over the next three years would fall short of what the Federal Gov ernment deemed necessary to meet its jobs growth target as set out in the employment White Paper and get the Bud get deficit down to around one per cent of gross domestic pro duct by 1996-97. Access Economics advised its business clients this week that the economy would grow by 3.75 per cent in 1994-95 and then fall to 3.5 per cent in the following year before slipping further to 3 per cent in 1996-97. This represents a steady decline from the 4.25 per cent tipped by Access for this financial year. At his post-White Paper address to the National .Press Club in Canberra yesterday, the Prime Minister, Paul Keating, said that annual growth of 4.5 per cent to 5 per cent should be achievable. Access Economics was supported by Econtech which said yester day that despite a lift in busi ness investment, it expected 3.7 per cent growth in 1994-95, marginally below the 3.8 per cent forecast for 1993-94. Ac cording to Econtech, the hous ing-industry, which had been rising strongly, had now peaked and thereafter should restrain growth in 1994-95. -tom Connors
  75. 1994-07-08 Article 118189552, score 8.90609 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NEALE FRASER,   DAVID WHEATON,   TONY ROCHE,   JIMMY CONNORS,   ASHLEY COO,   ANDRE AGASSI,   BILL TAL BERT,   JOHN MCEN ROE,   HIE NASTASE,   FRANK SEDGMAN,   BRYAN SHELTON,   KEN ROSEWALL,   KEN MCGREGOR,   HARRY HOPMAN,   GREG RU SEDSKI,   MAI ANDERSON,   JOHN NEWCOMBE,   LEW HOAD,   TONY TRABERT,   JAVIER FRANA,   JACK KRAMER,   MARK PCTCHEY,   BORIS BECKER,   DAVID WITT,   JIM MY CONNORS,   FRED STOLLE,   ROD LAVER,   PAT CASH,   ROY EMERSON,   ION TIRIAC
    Organisations CENTRE COURT,   INTERNA,   TIMES
    Locations CANADA,   NEWPORT,   SPAIN,   WIMBLEDON,   UNITED STATES
    Misc DAVIS CUP,   AMERICANS,   AUSSIE,   AUSTRA LIAN,   GERMAN,   AUSTRALIANS,   WIMBLEDON,   ATP TOUR,   MODERN,   AMERICAN,   ROMANIAN,   US OPEN,   AUSTRALIAN
    SPORT Top seed in Lew's way: a reminder of when tennis had money, standards and no brats Fame titles bows out PETER McFARLINE i Comment NEWPORT: Top seed Greg Ru sedski, of Canada, and twice cham pion Bryan Shelton were upset in the second round of the US215,000 ( A298,000) Interna tional Tennis Hall of Fame Cham pionships yesterday. American qualifier David Witt, ranked 209th in the world, used a big serve to end the title defence of Rusedski with a 6-4, 6-7, 6-4 win. The 42nd-ranked Rusedski, who won his lone career title on the ATP Tour last year, suffered a service break in the sixth game of the third set when he double-faulted twice to fall behind 4-2 and never recov ered. Shelton, who won the only grass court tournament in the US in 1991 and 1992, was picked off by fellow American David Wheaton 6-4,6-4. Wheaton, a former Wimbledon semi-finalist who has fallen to 127th from a career-high of world 12th. hit 11 aces and won all but four of his 39 first serve points against Shelton, who reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon. I served really well and I came up with the big serves on his break points, Wheaton said. Seventh seed Javier Frana of Ar gentina, the only other seed in sec ond round action yesterday, was beaten by Mark Pctchey 6-4, 6- At Wimbledon in 1985, Lew Hoad was taking tea one afternoon in a hospitality tent. Hoad's idea of afternoon tea was a beer, a ciga rette and a yam with old friends. He was doing all three on this afternoon but he was also keeping an eye on the television monitor. Out on Centre Court, John McEn roe, then the top-ranked player in the world, was giving yet another display of awe-inspiring tennis mixed with a lethal dose of bad temper and histrionics. What he was seeing clearly dis pleased him. In his unobtrusive way he let it be known that he had neither time nor understanding for gamesmanship or lack of self control on the tennis court. Hoad, whose death this week was a blow the tennis world could ill afford, loved Wimbledon and the other major tournaments. He had won in his time all of them except the US Open. And along the way had come, like almost all the other stars of his era and be fore, to appreciate sport for its wider implications. Being the most gifted athlete was only part of the game. Making friends and keeping them, living life to the fullest and respecting the game and its people were as important to him as the playing of it. The erosion of those values in the modern era greatly saddened him. He was still a regular visitor to the grand slam tournaments but he preferred to watch the juniors rather than the established stars. Hoad hated being disillusioned. And he was sadly disillusioned by the direction tennis has taken in the past two decades. Much of the sorrow and the tributes that have abounded this week have come from people who understood and appreciated the pure joy that the players the very best players of bygone eras brought to, and took from, their chosen sport.. When eventually McEnroe, Jim my Connors, Boris Becker, Andre Agassi and Pat Cash, to name a few, have their obituaries written by those who remember them in their prime, will the same emotions and sentiments clog the sports pages? I very much doubt it No-one has missed the emotive irony of Hoad's premature death on the day of the men's singles final just 37 years after he had won the second of his two titles, crushing countryman Ashley Coo per in just 52 minutes. Yet another piece of irony a few days earlier was scarcely noticed. Ion Tiriac is regarded by today's tennis community as the pioneer of the modern manager, the ruthless, single-minded planner of the ca reer paths of talented but tempera mental teenagers. Boris Becker is, Lew Hoad ... sadly disillusioned by the direction of modern tennis. of course, his best-known protege but there are a number of others. Last week in an interview in The Times, Tiriac blamed the ills of the modern game that is, the diminished standards of behaviour of the players on two factors: money and parents who drive their children for success at any cost His comments were taken serious ly. And so they should have been. But it should never be forgotten that the fiery Romanian was in the late 60s and early 70s one of the leaders in the decline of behaviour on the court Tiriac never won a major singles tournament but, as a doubles partner of Hie Nastase, he was a formidable presence. Tiriac and Nastase more often than not let their tempers get the better of them and their clashes with umpires and linesmen and women brought a new and unwel come dimension to the game. Because strong action was not taken immediately, the players who felt inclined to let their feel ings get the better of them prolifer ated. Nastase was a major influence on Jimmy Connors; Con nors on McEnroe; McEnroe on Pat Cash. And although Tiriac recog nised, nurtured and guided the pu bescent talent of Becker, there can be little argument that his playing philosophy was in part taken up by the German wunderkind. That same year that Hoad was shaking his head in disbelief at the behaviour of McEnroe, 17-year-old Becker was becoming the youngest male to win tennis's most presti gious championship. Yet even then some of his opponents felt that young Boris was using intimidat ory tactics against his opponents. The authorities never took action against him. The apologists for the modern player and the general falling away in standards of behaviour point to the huge pressure now placed on players to gain points for rankings and how can we forget it the ridiculous prizemoney now avail able to anyone who can make it into the top 100 in. the world. They forget, conveniently, that in the 50s and 60s the competition among the top men was as fierce and as even as it is today. Perhaps more so. The difference was that those men had been brought up. at home, at school and by their coaches to understand that while winning was important, losing was an integral part of the game and had to be handled with as much aplomb. There was just as much prestige at stake. And money was a source of considerable rancour. It was money that enticed leading ama teurs Frank Sedgman and Ken McGregor to join the professional ranks of American Jack Kramer. Hoad and his great friend, partner and competitor Ken Rosewall, did the same unthinkable act in 1957. Hoad signed up for 50,000, which was a fortune in those days. Many Australians regarded this as an act of treason. Gradually they came to their senses but it was more than a decade before the amateur titles opened up to the professionals. The point is that money in ten nis then was a matter of great im portance. Yet it did not seem to interfere with the established eti quette and inherent sportsmanship of tennis. Harry Hopman's effect on Aus tralian tennis was substantial. He was the architect of the success of Sedgman, McGregor, Hoad, Rose wall, Cooper, Neale Fraser, Roy Emerson, Fred Stolle, Rod Laver, Mai Anderson, John Newcombe and Tony Roche to name the brightest lights in his galaxy. He was also a rigid disciplinarian. The players prospered from this. But it did not stop someone like Hoad becoming a young man mag netically attracted to the so-called evils that afflicted the youth of the time. Hoad was a champion player as well as, in that dreadful Austra lian vernacular, a champion bloke. Yet he never did anything on the court or off it to lower tennis's admirably high standards. Indeed, he added to them. The Australians weren't alone in their production of players to whom the welfare of the game was more important than winning. The Americans were just as mindful. J recall a Davis Cup challenge round in the 50s when Tony Trabert, a Wimbledon champion and the out standing US player for many years, made a public comment that did not sit well with the US Davis Cup captain of the time, Bill Tal bert. Talbert told Trabert to make a public apology for his words be fore he played again. He did. It was a minor incident in the obscenity-ridden atmosphere of to day it would not have been worth mentioning but then it was' a. matter of major concern to ttie American officials. Tennis more than any other sport has allowed its players to run riot. Money may well be an inside ous part of the decline but the ! dreadful craving of parents arid so-called tennis gurus is as much,, if not more, to blame for the break down in the code of conduct. Aside from Martina's gracious farewell, perhaps the most com forting memory of Wimbledon 1994 was provided by Sampras,! who said long before he won his second championship that he had, tried to model himself on tfye golden age of Aussie tennis play ers . I hope Lew Hoad read that at, his ranch in Spain. Then agaifi, Lew would not have understood To him the era which he dominat ed was just as good as any before it. He could never comprehend that he had been a part of anything special in tennis. TtwiAg
  76. 1994-05-11 Article 118210699, score 8.90548 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN HEW,   ROSS PEAKE,   CHERYL KERNOT,   RALPH WIL,   RALPH WILLIS WILLIS,   MARTIN FER GUSON,   IAN SPICER
    Organisations BUDGET,   ACTU,   MEDICARE,   ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES,   CUSTOMS,   SENATE,   PARLIAMENT,   CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
    Locations SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   UNITED STATES
    Misc OLYMPICS,   ABORIGINAL,   BUD,   AUSTRALIAN DEMOCRATS,   AUSTRALIAN,   ASIAN
    HHBMflgg MttBM Probably never been better placed to achieve prolonged high economic and employment growth' Treasurer Ralph Willis Willis bets on business By ROSS PEAKE, Political Correspondent The Government is counting on a boom in business investment to underpin its Budget which directs its major spending to health programs and estab lishing a land buying fund for Aborigi- - nes, while reducing unemployment to below 10 per cent by June next year. The Budget, unveiled by Treasurer Ralph Wil lis last night, will give 135 million to help athletes prepare for the Sydney Olympics, 68 million extra in foreign aid and 48 million to teach Asian languages in schools. Mr Willis said his first Budget would be underpin ned by strong growth of 4.5 per cent in the economy and a sharp rise in business investment. He said the Budget contained no new taxes or tax increases, but predicted the financial year should end with a Budget deficit of 11.7 billion the figure much-awaited by the markets. After initial uncertainty, which saw the dollar fall and interest rates rise, markets reacted positively but modestly. Ten-year bond futures closed last night at 8.76 per cent, down slightly on the 8.79 per cent yield at which they were trading before the Budget. The Australian dollar, which had been at US72.04c before the Budget was unveiled, initially fell to US71.74c but bounced back and was trading late last night at US72.35c. The promised second round of 3.5 billion income tax cuts were not factored into the Budget's forward estimates for 1997-98 and Mr Willis said they would not be delivered before June 1998 at the earliest. The Government confirmed it will not introduce a jobs levy or increase the Medicare levy, but will crack down on tax compliance and increase the cost of aviation fuel. The airport departure tax will be scrapped to elimi nate complaints from the tourist industry and replaced with a 27 arrival tax, built in to the cost of air fares of international visitors arriving in Australia. The Budget predicts 250,000jobs will be created and unemployment will fall to 9.5 per cent by the end of the next financial year. The deficit will be cut faster than earlier thought and the 6.5 billion cost of programs for the unemployed contained in last week's White Paper will be fully covered. The outcome will be achieved without tax rises by relying on stronger than expected growth and general pruning of some government services. Business investment, the missing link in the recov ery, is predicted to rise by almost 14.5 per cent next financial year after only a 1 per cent rise this year. At a press conference, Mr Willis was forced to defend accusations that the forecasts, particularly for business investment, were too optimistic. He pointed out that Australia was already growing at 4 per cent per year, according to official figures. The Budget predicts inflation to rise marginally, to 2.25 per cent. The new spending program is focused on health, directing almost 1 billion over four years to new and expanded health programs. The main items are 500 million for Aboriginal health programs, 169 earmark ed for mental-health programs, 10 million to promote immunisation of children, 93 million for medical research and 209 million to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The Aboriginal land fund will receive almost 1.5 billion in the next 10 years. New spending on Aborigi nal health includes 162 million to expand services and 338 million to establish housing, sewerage facili ties, water and power. Continued on Page 22 Treasurer counts on a boom in business Continued from Page 1. Taxation benefits will be in creased for schemes which en courage employees to buy company shares. The chief executive of the Aus tralian Chamber of Commerce Ian Spicer praised the Budget for not creating sharp changers in policy direction. ACTU president Martin Fer guson said the Budget placed the onus on business to maximise opportunities created by Austra lia's strong economic growth. Opposition Leader John Hew son accused the Government of reaping 6 billion in extra reve nue from bracket creep when wage earners are forced into higher tax brackets by inflation through the refusal to give the second round of tax cuts. He said this meant the Gov ernment had misled people by claiming there were no tax in creases tn the Budget and he re fused to rule out blocking Budget tax measures in the Senate. Australian Democrats Leader Cheryl Kernot said the Budget lacks guts and was designed to buy off the Opposition. Mr Willis repeated the Gov ernment's belief that a 5 per cent unemployment rate should be within our grasp by the turn of the century and said even lower levels should be possible in sub sequent years. Australia has probably never been better placed to achieve a prolonged period of high eco nomic and employment growth, he told Parliament. This Budget, by confirming and improving the Govern ment's deficit reduction pro gram, takes further steps to enable ... sustained high growth. Mr Willis said public servants would be retrenched in Customs, Administrative Services and the Australian Quarantine Inspec tion Service. He defended the growth pro jections and the assumption that the Budget framework would be underpinned by a boom in busi ness investment. I don't think we've been at all over-optimistic about growth ... There is nothing on the horizon one can see that can conceivably change that, he said. Mr Willis argued the Govern ment had cut business taxes and improved depreciation provi sions in previous statements and it was now up to business to get the economy moving with in vestment. If it doesn't happen, you've got to ask, what are our busi nesses in this country doing? he said. The Budget, the first to be is sued before the end of the finan cial year, estimates the deficit for this financial year will come in at 13.6 billion 2.4 billion low er than forecast in last year's Budget. The Budget deficit will be fur ther reduced in 1994-95 to 11.7 billion, 2.5 per cent of GDP. The Government aims to reduce the deficit to 1 per cent of GDP by 1996-97 and estimates the Bud get will be in surplus towards the end of the decade. The Budget slightly accelerates the deficit reduction schedule set last year, with the Budget papers estimating the deficit falling to 0.4 per cent of GDP in 1997-98, the last year for which estimates are given.
  77. 1994-03-05 Article 118156007, score 8.824518 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MAURICE DUNLEVY,   JOAN NA TROLLOPE,   JEANETTE WINTERSON,   MARCUS CLAPHAM,   WORDSWORTH CLASSICS,   JOHN IRVING,   EDITH WHARTON,   JANET FRAME,   HAROLD EVANS,   KARL MARX,   EVELYN WAUGH,   GRAHAM GREENE,   ALLEN LANE,   DICK FRANCIS,   TREVOR GLOVER,   CATHERINE COOKSON,   CLIVE REY,   MICHAEL ONDAATJE,   MONA MINIM,   PATRICIA HIGHSMITH,   T. S. ELIOT,   JULIAN BARNES,   BRIAN MOORE,   GEORGE ELIOT
    Organisations BBC,   RANDOM HOUSE,   MODERN LIBRARY,   EVERYMAN,   REED CONSUMER BOOKS,   OXFORD
    Locations HERTFORDSHIRE,   VIRGINIA WOOLF,   ENGLAND,   BRITAIN,   BRIGHTON ROCK
    Misc MODERN LI,   WORLD CLASSICS,   PEACE,   BLOOMSBURY CLASSICS,   ENGLISH
    Yesterday's classics, today's best-sellers Maurice Dunlevy AS I WRITE this column, the best-selling novel in England is a classic written more than 120 years ago. It's selling at the rate of2000 copies a day and is outselling the latest nov els by Catherine Cookson and Dick Francis. It contains no explicit sex, no gratuitous violence and is neither a thriller nor a romancc. It's not a so cial melodrama. It isn't even a shop ping novel. But George Eliot's Middlemarch is a 6 million BBC television series and it's selling like a bonkbuster. Who dares to say the classics are dead books by deceased authors? Who could sustain the case when Edith Wharton's The Age of Inno cence is also one of Britain's top-sell ing novels? Film and television took these two titles to the top, but even without the help of film the classics are enjoying a boom comparable to the one they enjoyed around the end of last centu ry, and bookbuyers are enjoying the benefits of a price war. In January Penguin launched its new cheap classics series, Penguin Popular Classics, because their mar ket was being eroded by Wordsworth Classics, published in paperback at a mere 1 ( 2.12) apiece by a small Hertfordshire reprint house. In the Wordsworth series a slim Richard II costs 1 pound and a fat War and Peace also costs 1. At first we thought they were cra zy to charge such a low price, but it's a pretty impressive package, conceded Penguin's managing director, Trevor Glover. Marcus Clapham and Clive Rey nard launched their Wordsworth Classics 18 months ago. They kept the price to 1 apiece by publishing big editions (at least 100,000 copies of each title), offering the text without introduction or notes, marketing in supermarkets and chains, and letting the popular titles subsidise the un popular. Their turnover doubled in a year and their profit in the past year was 1.5 million ( A3.2 million). Now everyone is getting into the booming classics market and trying to find new ways of packaging the product. I have before me the entry of Reed Consumer Books. They've re cently launched Compact Books, a series of pocket-sized hardcover clas sics with glossy dust jackets, board covers and glued spines. The first six titles are Evelyn Waugh's Vile Bodies and Decline and Fall, Graham Greene's Brighton Rock and The Heart of the Matter and George Or well's Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. No commissioned in troduction, no scholarly notes. Just the plain text and priced from 10.95 to 12.95. This throws out a challenge to two recently relaunched hardcover clas sics series, Everyman's Library and the Modern Library. Their titles can cost from two to four times as much. But they do offer extras. Everyman's (relaunched in 1991) offers full-cloth covers, section sewing, ribbon mark ers, acetate protective jackets and ac id-free, cream wove high opacity pa per. They are built to last, although the type in many of them doesn't match the standards of the binding and paper. The other major hardcover series was Random House's response to Everyman's, which returned a profit in its first year. Harold Evans re launched the venerable Modern Li brary at the end of 1992. Its big selling point is that unlike Everyman's the type is consistently good. That's be cause Random exchanged computer book rights for the resetting of all titles. Like Everyman's, Modern's chief appeal is to those who believe a classic volume, like a classic text, should be durable. Another new hardcover series calls into question this hallmark of dura bility. Bloomsbury Classics come in a hardcover pocket format and blas phemously mix Virginia Woolf with Patricia Highsmith and many other living literary novelists such as Joan na Trollope, Julian Barnes, Brian Moore, John Irving and Jeanette Winterson. The three titles I have before me are Michael Ondaatje's Coming Through Slaughter, Janet Frame's Mona Minim and the Smell of the Sun and Will Selfs The Quantity Theory of Insanity (each a hefty 24.95, but Bloomsbury would have to pay royalties). Although I don't agree with T. S. Eliot's opinion that there are no true classics in English, I' do have doubts about the premature labelling of these as classics. I have no doubts, however, about the classic status of most of the titles in the three major English paperback classics series, Penguin Classics, which Allen Lane expanded rapidly in the 1950s and which has been re launched several times, Oxford's World Classics, which was re launched in September 1990 and has since doubled its sales, and Every man's paperbacks, relaunched in 1991. All are aimed at the student market and all offer substantial intro ductions by literary notables, scholar ly notes, and in some cases, new translations. Their prices range from around 7 for a popular title such as Pride and Prejudice to a rip-ofT 24.95 for each of the three volumes of the Penguin edition of Karl Marx's Capi tal. It's nice to see the revival of inter est in the classics. It will be very interesting to see how these and other classics series fare in the marketplace now that competition is heating up. Bookbuyers reaped the benefits dur ing the big classics revival at the end of last century, but eventually the dozens of competitors fell away to a handful and prices rose again.
  78. 1994-10-29 Article 118294575, score 8.8073635 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ROBERT COTTRELL,   MARK ROBER TI,   GEORGE MACARTNEY,   JOHN WILEY,   GEORGE III
    Organisations FOREIGN OFFICE,   ALBION,   COMMU NIST PARTY
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN,   ASIA,   CHINA,   ROAD,   NEW YORK,   VICTORIA PARK,   BOHAI RIM,   UNITED STATES,   HONG KONG,   IMPERIAL CHINA,   BEIJING,   CELESTIAL KINGDOM
    Misc CHINESE,   TRI,   CHINESE EMPIRE,   SINO-BRITISH,   TIANANMEN-STYLE COM,   NA,   OPIUM WAR,   BASIC LAW,   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT,   CHINESE EMPEROR,   BRITISH,   COMMUNIST
    End of freedom for Hong Kong? THE FALL OF HONG KONG. China's Tri umph and Britain's Betrayal. By Mark Rober ti. John Wiley & Sons. 336pp. 45. Reviewer: PAUL MONK. BOOKS about Hong Kong these clays are rather like books about Homo sapiens and the ccosphere. There arc doomsayers, relentless optimists and just about every shade of disposition in be tween. Mr Roberti,. a journalist who worked in Hong Kong for a decade up till last year - as a correspondent for Asi aweek - falls somewhere in thedoomsay ing part of this spectrum. His subtitle con tains the basic message: the free city is about to fall into the hands of barbar ians . He is reportedly living now in New York and working on a novel about Hong Kong. Most of this book consists, of a narrative account of the Sino-British negotiations over the future of . Hong Kong from 1982 to 1990. Mr Roberti's claim to originality is that he, in his own words, worked full time for more than two years, interviewing 142 people in Hong Kong, London and Beijing, including 'almost all of the major players', and 'filed over a hundred Free dom of Information Requests with the United States government'; thereby recon structing a more or less definitive record of the negotiations. ' ? His argument is uncomplicated: Britain is stripping the people of Hong Kong of the protection of British democracy and forcing them to live under a Communist dictatorship. Or, as he puts it, a little less baldly, towards the end of his book, Hav ing failed to provide the Hong Kong peo ple with either a truly representative gov ernment to protect them after 1997 or a place of refuge, Britain has left her colonial subjects to the mercy and whims of Chi na's leaders. The Basic Law gives Beijing the means to control every facet of Hong Kong's administration through its hand picked governor. Even, more damning, The gap between what the Hong Kong people needed in order to keep living in freedom and what China was willing to give could not be bridged, so the Foreign Office and Thatcher's government simply covered it up. Mr Roberti's account of the Sino-British negotiations may prove to be the most complete we will get this side of the repeal of. the Official Secrets Act. Certainly, it is quite detailed enough for anyone )who de sires a working record of the process. Per haps it might have been made more useful, though, by inclusion of the text of the Ba sic Law, or at least its most significant clauses, much as Robert Cottrell includes the text of the Sino-British Joint Declara tion of December 19, 1984 as an annex to his, 1993 book The End of Hong Kong. However, Mr Roberti's book conspicu ously lacks two things which are vital to the sort of case its author tried to build. First, an opening chapter setting out a his torically reflective and conceptually sophist . icated dilation on what has made Hong Kong such a vibrant and prosperous city-state in the colonial era. Second, a much more substantial conclusion, setting out with maturity and rigour the grounds for the author's opinion that Hong Kong, as we know and love it, is about to pass into history and that its people may suffer serious oppression in the process. The ab sence of both these elements makes The Fall of Hong Kong a thinner book, in both senses of . the term, than its subject de serves. What seems to elude Mr Roberti, in his concern over the possible end of freedom in Hong Kong, is the tremendous historical irony involved in what is about to happen to that great enclave of colonialism and 'capitalism. If one can stand back just a lit tle from the recent drama over democratic reform and fears of Tiananmen-style Com munist repression in Victoria Park or Na than Road, what seems to me to stand out is the grand dialectic of Hong Kong's history from the Opium War to 1997. Let's remember that the barren island of Hong Kong and its mainland toehold were extracted from Imperial China as part of a British campaign to prise the Middle King dom open to foreign trade. The Emperor Qianlong, after all, wrote to King George III in 1793, We have never valued inge nious articles, nor do we have the slightest need of your country's manufactures. His Britannic Majesty's envoy to the Celestial Kingdom, George Macartney, noted, on that occasion, that the Chinese Empire, awesome though it appeared, suffered from grave internal weaknesses that could lead to its disintegration. Well, we are still hearing variations on Lord Macartney's prediction, but the atti tude of the Chinese Emperor has changed in toto caelo. In between, Hong Kong has been taken by Britain and used as a base from which, in many ways, the change of attitude in China has been subtly engen dered and is now being engineered. Does China want it back in order to reverse this process? Hardly. It is intent, however, on reversing the result of the Opium War. What is at stake, therefore, is no longer the old issue of opening China to foreign trade. That war has been won by Britain. The issue now is whether China can be changed further, into a less arbitrary and repressive polity, one in which the rule of law and not of men prevails. The Commu nist Party fears that perfidious Albion is 'The issue now is whether China can be changed further.' trying, none too subtly, to use Hong Kong to this end. Now Hong Kong cannot be held for this purpose, but the very reincor poration of it into China may very well subtly engender the kind of change in ques tion - over a long period. Mr Roberti is plainly concerned at more immediate possibilities of political repres sion and human tragedy. His moral con cern does him credit, but perhaps it vitiates his political and economic judgment. He asserts that Britain should have either in troduced full democracy to Hong Kong years ago and so presented China with a fait accompli before the approach of retro cession made the issue too sensitive. Per haps. But by his own account there is now and has long been a powerful constituency in Hong Kong which opposes demoralisa tion. Mr Roberti nowhere spells out how or when the massive changes might plausi bly have been introduced against this op position and in view of the colony's histor ical character. Tacitly conceding this point, he declares that Britain should have al lowed any or all of Hong Kong's citizens to emigrate. He argues that this would have proved an economic boon to Britain. Per haps - though it would have destroyed Hong Kong, which would not be to anyone's benefit. He wavers on the matter of Hong Kong's economic future, for bet ter or for worse, before entering the judg ment that it will cease to be an Asia/Pacif ic financial centre and instead become almost exclusively a Chinese financial and commercial centre within 20 years from 1997. This is highly contentious, given both current trends and China's prospects. Mr Roberti concedes that China's bur geoning middle class ( estimated in 1993 to be about 200 million ) and booming economy are drawing record amounts of foreign investment and that vast quantities of this are being channelled through Hong Kong. He does not explore the ways in which Hong Kong is itself financially colo nising China. But he concludes that inter national companies are unlikely to expose their regional operations to the risks of a legal system that cannot protect their as sets, to a government that could blacklist them .,. to political uncertainty and per haps to social turmoil. If this is so, why is foreign investment pouring into Shang hai, the Bohai Rim and ever deeper reaches of the Chinese hinterland? Mr Roberti does not allow for the dialectical interaction of China's forbidding ways with the now indisputable pull of international economic engagement. As well, he betrays his lack of apprecia tion for the triumph that Hong Kong itself is in the larger context of Chinese history.
  79. 1994-05-22 Article 118213144, score 8.719472 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People KING VIDOR,   BILLY WILDER,   GRAZIA DE ROSSI,   STANLEY DONEN,   KAREN MOLINE,   HUBERT DE GIVENCHY,   WALT WHITMAN,   JACK CARDIFF WAR,   GREGORY PECK,   STEPHEN SAUNDERS,   FRANZ PLANER,   HARRY STRADLING,   FRED ASTAIRE,   JOHN HUSTON,   ROBERT OLMSTEAD,   BRIAN JEFFREY,   WILLIAM WYLER,   CARY GRANT,   JOHN LOVEDAY,   MARK COOVELIS,   NICK MUNCIE,   DAVID THOMSON,   AUDREY HEPBURN,   FRED ZINNEMANN,   AMY BLOOM,   GARY COOPER,   GEORGE CUKOR,   ROBYN KARNEY,   ROBYN KAMEY
    Organisations SCEPTRE,   MAFIA,   MACMILLAN
    Locations 213PP,   SICILY,   240PP,   277PP,   HOLLYWOOD,   OREGON,   OLIVIA,   MOLINE,   175PP,   NEW HAMPSHIRE,   PARIS
    Misc MY FAIR LADY,   PEACE,   ENGLISHMAN,   RIVER DOGS,   AMERICAN,   DISASTROUS BLOODLINE,   ROMAN,   BRITISH
    Books Celebrating a virtuous life THIS is a book which delivers more than its large format and generous number of photographs might suggest. It is an unashamed celebration of Hepburn's life and films, and regular allusions to the subject's virtuous qualities leave no doubt about the author's partiality. Yet the text is intelligent, controlled and sufficiently detailed and perceptive to allow the reader to review some interesting constants in Hepburn's career. One is the benefit she derived almost from the outset of working with great directors. In a dozen of her 26 films, beginning with her first major screen role in Roman Holiday (1953), she worked with some of Hollywood's big-league directors William Wyler, Billy Wilder, King Vidor, George Cukor, Stanley Donen, Fred Zinnemann and John Huston. She would, later comment, I was so terribly lucky to really, by chance fall into movie-making at a period when these directors were around and wanted me, and that has been the sort of miracle of my career . . . Another constant is the way Hepburn reinforced her innate good taste and sense of style through a close and lifelong association with the likes of Paris couturier Hubert de Givenchy, the team of Alberto and Grazia de Rossi, who influenced her cosmetic and hair styles, and accomplished cinematographers such as Franz Planer (The Nun's Story, 1959), Jack Cardiff War and Peace, 1956) and Harry Stradling (My Fair Lady, 1964). This careful approach to her public image enabled her to achieve renown as for her style as for her films, and gave rise to a standard Hepburn lexicon which included. charm, poise, elfin, wistful, ethereal, urchin, gazelle-like, chic, gamine and simply class . A third constant is Hepburn's teaming with older leading men as a foil for her screen image of doe-eyed innocence, beginning with Gregory Peck in Roman Holiday and running through a string of films including Funny Face (Fred Astaire), Love in the Afternoon (Gary Cooper) and Charade (Cary Grant). Author Robyn Kamey observes that, A STAR DANCED: The Life of Audrey Hepburn. By Robyn Karney. Bloomsbury. 191pp. 39.95. Reviewer: BRIAN JEFFREY. while the technique usually worked well, it failed badly when the 56-year-old and chronically ill Gary Cooper had to pass for a playboy having an affair with a mysterious young woman. His gaunt and sadly aged features had to be overcome by filming through gauze filters and keeping him in the shadows. As a result, this otherwise enjoyable film is spoiled by the muffling of Cooper's role. Karney says Hepburn's early films, popular as they were, led some critics to question her acting ability. Except for this ability to exude an impish, waif-like quality, there is no evidence that Audrey Hepburn can do anything else, opined one. Readers will probably side with the author in arguing that Hepburn answered her critics with strong performances in such films as The Nun's Story, undoubtedly the weightiest role of her career and one in which, through the nuances of her performance, she effected elements of steely strength as a counterpoint to her character's natural vulnerability. She also demonstrated in her later roles that, when necessary, she could dispense with her haute couture image for uninhibited physicality. This is nowhere more evident than in Two For The Road, her most adult and difficult role, in which she portrays a character during five stages of a couple's disintegrating re- lationship over a 12-year period. The book examines Hepburn's films in some detail. Sadly, towards the end of her career, film styles changed and there was little place for her ability to project fashion, innocence and fun. Instead, films were promoting violence, gutter language and rasping contemporaneity . Recalling Hepburn's unhappy experience in one of the few roles she accepted during the 1970s, the disastrous Bloodline, which was filmed in Sicily, one of her colleagues tells Karney, Audrey [had] come with her own bodyguard, but decided after a while that, on balance, Audrey Hepburn: careful approach to image enabled her to achieve renown as much for her style as for her films she'd rather be kidnapped by the Mafia than have to complete the picture . . . Karney says Hepburn's lifelong modesty in acknowledging her natural gifts was genuine. She writes, What set her apart from many actors of whom the same might be said was her ability to live alone with her emotional disabilities; she never allowed them to affect her public or professional behaviour, never took refuge in drugs or drink or promiscuity. She herself would have held this to be her good fortune, rather than something to admire. This is a fine tribute to a woman who delivered the goods through an incomparable combination of personality, elegance and sensuous yet untouchable beauty. I recommended it to her many admirers. Winter reading to cause the shivers FOR WINTER reading try these emerging talents. For extra shivers, try Mark Coovelis and Karen Moline. ROBERT OLMSTEAD is a distinctive American regionalist. The New Hampshire of his stories echoes to the uncom- promising language of farmers, diggers and fellers. In This Life and Bruno and Rachel are energetic stories of family ties and travails. They have the magnificently moving naturalism of Brueghel paintings. In A Place to Stay an impromptu .Wedding turns a man's sights to home. A startling hunting tragedy is a A Boon to a man pestered by his late father's best friend. Various dogs and cows are laid low in River Dogs (Minerva, 240pp, 13.95). Readers, stay your animadversions on these adverse animals. In This Life will make it all up to you, with the piercing scene where Harley's love Elizabeth disappears on a snowy lake. Only in his 40th year, Olmstead also has three novels. PSYCHOTHERAPIST Amy Bloom cracked Best American Short Stories two years running. If the collection Come to Me (Macmillan, 175pp, 12.95) is any indication, she would make a warm and insightful counsellor. The first and best story, Love is not a Pie , celebrates the life and death of a woman who has loved two men gracefully for many years. Bloom has a lucid and feminine sensibility for family follies. A widow, having slept with her stepson in a moment of madness, goes on a shopping jag for an ill-matched set of goods which is clearly the cart of a woman at the end of her PAPERBACKS Stephen Saunders rope . A man invites a couple to dinner to check out the woman who may become his next lover. A young woman waiting for her aged husband to die lies to him about imaginary lovers. Less successful are the psychotherapy- based studies and a whole-of-life story set in the voice of a male narrator. NEW YORKER Mark Coovelis's murderous' monster would challenge Amy Bloom's therapy. As is the way these days, this auspicious first novel starts at the end and works back to it. The guilty question for brother Marvin is what he was doing when Gloria (MacMillan, 213pp, 12.95) drifted into the hands of a serial killer. Marvin strikes up a relationship with a woman doing an In Cold Blood on the case. It's hard to pinpoint why Coovelis's undemonstrative style is effective. Here is the rare journalist to make a respectable crossing to fiction. A DIFFERENT kind of obsession impels young British novelist Karen Moline. Famed actor Nick Muncie's raw maleness is overpowering . He is one of these men who are so skilled at sex but who cannot love . Seducing brilliant portraitist Olivia is his big mistake. There's a creepy-crawly fascination to Olivia's squirming and Nick's increasing desperation. Moline's exploitative, if expertly served, Lunch (Picador, 372pp, 14.95) leaves a bitter aftertaste. Does the beast like Nick exist and could any sane woman really fall for him? Hmm ... a survey of the corridors of power may help us resolve the question. IN HALO (Sceptre, 277pp, 14.95) an orphan lad on a wagon train to Oregon falls into bed with (that's right) Lorelei, luscious mother of the girl Justly. Unlike the sexual education that Moline's Nick visits on Olivia, the boy Scrag's sexual awakening is safe and sentimental. His photographer friend Sylvester inspires him to poetry with Walt Whitman's newly published Leaves of Grass. It is left to the town of Halo to show Scrag the bad side of frontier life. British poet John Loveday's fancy of the American frontier is like fellow Englishman David Thomson's romantic Silver Light. It offers a different view of 19th-century mores.
  80. 1994-01-16 Article 126922966, score 8.689077 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ANTHONY MASON,   R. G. MENZIES,   GARFIELD BAI,   BRUCE DONALD,   G. BARWICK,   KERRY PACKER,   RAY MARTIN,   JIM HACKER
    Organisations ACTU,   ABC
    Jim Hacker, Sir G. Barwick, and the pitfalls of the public eye I RICHARD BEGBIE I MOST journalists have become, in their own pale indoor way, as bushfire-weary as the commu nity at large. What started out as a good story has turned into a national night mare. The ominous pillars of smoke by day and fire by night have aroused a new sense of how little and frail is our subur ban cocoon in the face of this ancient, capricious land. Tales of ordinary heroism and subur ban tragedy have at least rescued us from silly-season pieces on post-Christmas sales and performing dogs. But they have also diverted attention from a lengthy ABC interview with the nonagenarian Sir Garfield Bai;wick. Any other lime it would surely have excited a, few lawyers, as well as the dwindling band of 1975 stalwarts who still maintain their rage. Reports and comments I have seen tended to focus on the program's refer ences to the 1975 drama, especially the fact that Sir G. consulted the present Chief Justice, Sir Anthony Mason. Why this unremarkable revelation should cause a stir nearly 20 years on escapes me. Perhaps it was the only reportable crumb to fall from an interview table where Sir Garfield spent an hour insisting he had no feelings on any of the issues raised. It was not hard to believe him. Yet this was a remarkable piece of television all the same. The content of the interview was dull, but its style and man ner were, for 1994, quite exceptional. Here, in full colour, was a program that will always live in memory in the grainy black and white of our old Pye 21-inch, circa 1965. I don't think I've seen any public figure treat an interviewer with such cavalier disdain, such easy hauteur, since R. G. Menzies was at the height of his power . Hawke was a boy in the ACTU. Now don't get the wrong picture. The interviewer was no Hinch or Carleton. Bruce Donald was not just polite, he showed the almost desperate respect due to a living legend. But the legend gave him no quarter. Poor Donald's understanding of events, the line of his questions, the very presuppositions of his world-view, were all fatally flawed. It was clear, one was made to feel, that the great man had made a major concession in condescend ing to do the interview, and could now see that he was wasting his time with a sprat who hadn't done his homework. Like some ancient Galapagon tortoise he sat, eyes blinking slowly and mechani cally, imf ervious to the hasty judgments and shallow questions of a mere journal ist. (To this mere journalist Donald seemed to have done his homework very well indeed.) My, how times have changed. The only public figure, let alone politician, who would treat an ABC interviewer thus in 1994 is probably Mr Kerry Packer. For the rest, Jim Hacker, of Yes, Minister fame, has become exemplar. We laugh at his fawning attitude to interviewer or reporter because it is close enough to life. Eminent people queue up to appear on or in the mass . media, as only film stars once did. At the end of the interview it is they who thank the interviewer for asking them on, rather than the conven tion that prevailed in Sir Garfield's day and was so courteously maintained by Bruce Donald the other night. It is the current-affairs host, the disc jockey, who is now the star. See how prime ministers and opposition leaders fall over themselves at election time to appear on Sixty Minnies or the John Laws radio program. (Laws, for Can berra's educated illiterate, is the bloke with the pink shirt who promotes engine oil between overs in the cricket.) Ray Martin is more famous than most he interviews. 1 am not for a moment advocating a return to the manner affected by public figures on news and current affairs pro grams of the 60s. It is elitist, propagan dist, and a bad example to the children. But the Barwick interview did serve as stark reminder that the latter-day alterna tive is, if anything, more odious. News and current affairs today de mand novelty, excitement, scandal and violence what news producers call the best bits of bang-bang . Public fig ures who behave themselves and concen trate on their jobs arc short on these desiderata. To be noticed by a dollar driven entertainment industry which re quires regular victims, they have to spend lots of time doing silly, trivial things. Some, especially among the politic ians, arc undoubtedly Hackeresque in their addiction to the public eye. We see or hear them every day, no longer able to help themselves in the quest for 24-hour exposure. The symbiosis of such addicts with an industry fast turning into one giant video-clip presents a disturbing prospect for government in the new cen tury. It was surely no chance that 1 became aware of this addiction around the end of the Menzies-Barwick era. The first addict I saw at close quarters was an eminent man whose work had brought him re cently into the public eye. With alarming speed his attention shifted from that sub J stantial and important work to his im age . Circumstances brought me quite close to him, and I noticed that he had begun to take all the daily newspapers. He would sit at his desk each day, flicking through them in a non-stop fever of im patience. There's a lot in there I can do without, he would say grumpily after each lightning scan. At first in my innocence 1 saw this as evidence of a great mind. How quickly he could skim and absorb the key elements of national and international news! But it soon became clear that his ritual response meant only that the paper had made no reference to himself. And as the scales fell from my eyes I began to see the same thing emerging on all sides. Perhaps he was an extreme, but through his eyes 1 first saw the ghost of things to come, and feared for it. Even the Barwick model, antipathetic and inade quate as it is, might be preferable to this.
  81. 1994-05-20 Article 118212757, score 8.641669 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALEX TROTMAN,   PETER BREWER,   JOHN OGDEN
    Organisations GEN ERAL MOTORS-HOLDEN,   FORD ASIA-PACIFIC,   FORD,   CAPRI,   EF FALCON,   DETROIT MOTOR SHOW,   FAO,   FORD FALCON,   LINCOLN CONTINENTAL,   FORD MOTOR COMPANY,   FORD AUSTRALIA,   FALCON
    Locations BROADMEADOWS FORD,   MELBOURNE,   EUROPE GRANADA,   MICHIGAN,   AUSTRALIA,   BROADMEADOWS,   TAIWAN,   EUROPE,   FORD AUSTRALIA,   UNITED STATES,   DEARBORN,   JAPAN
    Misc GM-H,   POST-EF FALCON,   GLI,   ESCORT,   EUROPEAN,   LASER,   JAPANESE,   AUSTRALIAN
    Pictures: CAR AUSTRALIA The new EF Ford Falcon: above, photographed secretly near the Broadmeadows Ford factory recently; right, the headlights, tail-lights and nose of the EF borrow Commodore styling. Will the EF be Ford's last Australian Falcon, asks PETER BREWER. IF IMITATION is the sincerest flat tery, then Ford has paid rival Gen eral Motors-Holden a huge compli ment. The new EF model Ford Falcon, due for release in July, borrows many of the styling cues of the highly successful VR Commodore in an attempt to peg back the Holden's snowballing popularity. As these photographs taken near the Ford factory at Broadmeadows, Mel bourne, show, the shape of the head lights and tail-lights of the new Falcon are strikingly similar to the Commodore, as is the attempt to give the nose of the car a much lower, wide-tracked look and improve its aerodynamics. All the sheet-metal in front and be hind the EF Falcon's doors is new, and the boot has a pronounced lip on its trailing edge. The upmarket Fairmont and XR models will have a wide but comprcssed headlight/driving light com bination lamp, and cooling air for the engine will be ducked from below the bumper line. Inside the car, Ford has revised the seat design, dashboard and centre con sole layout and door trims, and added a driver's airbag (which will be optional on the entry level GLi). Ford has capitulated on one of the most glaring design faults of the EA range and banished its awkward umbrel la-type handbrake in favour of the more conventional lever type, located on the left hand side of the driver's seat along side the console. This is the final and most extensive makeover of the current Falcon, a direct successor to the much-criticised EA se ries. Ford Australia president John Ogden is remaining tight-lipped over the com pany's manufacturing future, and the re cent global restructuring announced by the Ford Motor Company offers little scope for the Australian arm to retain its current level of design and engineer ing autonomy. By January 1, 1995, two of Ford's largest (and previously autonomous) op erations Ford of Europe and Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan will be merged into a single global operation: Ford Automotive Operations. Ford Asia-Pacific, which encompasses facilities in Japan, Taiwan and Australia, will be added to FAO over the next few years. The aim of the plan is to save money and make Ford a leaner, more efficient operation beyond 2000, with the amalgamation of the European and United States operations expected to save an estimated 8 billion by the end of the decade. Under plans for FAO, the US will be the world-wide source for all Ford's large rear wheel drive platforms (such as Lincoln Continental and Ford Crown Victoria) and large front-drive models like the Taurus/Sable and the made-for Europe Granada. Light trucks, too, will remain a responsibility of the Dearborn research and development centre. Ford of Europe will retain responsibil ity for the company's small/medium front-drive cars like the Escort, Mondeo and Festiva. Where Ford Australia fits into the wider scheme of operations is uncertain, but in an interview at the Detroit Motor Show in January, the president of Ford Motor Company, Alex Trotman, was adamant that for the Australian opera tion to continue, it must remain finan cially viable and fund all its own pro duct development. This poses a major dilemma for Ford Australia. Freshening up an existing model is, by motor industry standards, a relatively inexpensive task. GM-H spent S140 mil lion refurbishing the sheet-metal, upgrad ing the electronics and widening the track on its VR Commodore, adding in all the development time and re-tooling. Ford's bill for the EF Falcon will be a similar sum and this upgrade will help the range soldier on until 1997. What happens from that point on, however, is uncertain. The cost of developing an all-new Fal con/Fairlane range, even by borrowing an existing platform from the US, would leave Ford Australia with little change from SI billion a sum it clearly can not afford even though the company is expecting a return to modest profitability in the next two years A transplanted US rear-wheel drive car would require considerable restyling and re-engineering to suit the quite dif ferent requirements of Australian buyers. To keep the Falcon cost-competitive, it must have a high percentage of local content, which would add to the com plexity of developing an Aussie-US Fal con hybrid . This option would be less expensive but would leave Ford still saddled with a costly, long-term big car prograrc which may not be flexible enough foi the future. Fully importing a car froir the US or Europe is a long-odds chancc for the future Falcon. Australian buyers have an overwhelm ing preference for rear-drive big famil) cars, and there are none in the Ford US line-up which would remotely appeal here. The longer Ford delays making a de cision on the post-EF Falcon, the more the odds shorten on an extensive mak eover : a low-cost but thorough rework ing of the current car. This is a safe option in the short-term because the value of the yen has inflated the cost of imported Japanese cars, dampening their appeal and allowing the Falcon and Commodore to share 35 pet cent of the total passenger car market. With the Capri finished and local as sembly of the Laser slowly grinding to a halt, Ford Australia's entire manufactur ing focus is now on the Falcon. If it is axed completely and Ford has refused to rule out that option a major pillar of the Australian motor in dustry will fall with it.
  82. 1994-09-21 Article 118139231, score 8.597184 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALAN BOND,   JOHN BANNON,   TREVOR SYKES,   ABE GOLDBERG,   CHRISTOPHER SKASE,   LAU RIE CONNELL
    Organisations RESERVE BANK,   STATE BANK OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA,   TNE CANBERRA TIMES,   BELL RESOURCES,   QINTEX,   ALLEN & UNWIN
    Locations AMERICA,   AUSTRALIA
    Misc SOUTH AUSTRALIAN DEMO,   CUP,   AUSTRALIAN
    Fairy tales believed too readily TOM CONNORS looks at a book on the antics of the corporate cowboys of the 1980s. TREVOR SYKES learned one major lesson when writing his saga of Aus tralia's failed corporate cow boys, The Bold Riders: never trust the recollections of people who claim to have a good memory. There were contacts who claimed not only to know the dates of significant meetings involving the financial dealings of the high flyers of the late 1980s but everyone who was there and the decisions taken. But painstaking checks often found them to be wrong on all counts. The secret of writing history, whether financial or social, he says, is to get the chronology right because without this things do not fall into place. Sykes was talked into writ ing the book by his publisher, Allen and Unwin, who thought that with his 25 years as a re spected financial journalist it would be a reasonably stress less task. However, Sykes let himself in for three years of hard slog trying to get the chronology right while delving into the seamy world of corporate crime and mismanagement. It was a world where com-' pany balance sheets told fairy tales about their financial strength. Some recorded year after year of good profits while the companies were effectively broke and hanging on by a piece of cotton. The balance sheets did not show the millions being stashed away by the corporate cowboys in their family compa nies, how they were ripping off shareholders with extravagant salaries, bonuses, share alloca tions and luxurious lifestyles. Banks and other lenders did not give balance sheets and an nual reports more than a pass ing glance in the late 1980s in their frenzy to lend to Alan Bond, Christopher Skase, Lau rie Connell and others. Sykes describes the period as truly abnormal to the extent that the corporate cowboys could lay their hands on so much money with so little se curity. He says that never before in Australian history has so much money been channelled by so many people incompetent to lend it into the hands of so many people incompetent to manage it . Sykes comes down hard on the banks, arguing that the fi nancial crashes of the late 1980s were the result of the breakdown of the Australian fi nancial system, both financial ly and morally. The banks, regarded widely as the guardians of the con servative monetary faith lost 20 billion in unsound lending. If the banks were not lending massive amounts directly to the cowboys, it was being done by the finance companies they established. In The Bold Riders, Sykes ex plains that each trading bank was like a stiffly respectable hotel which insists that guests could not take ladies to their rooms but the desk clerk could always, however, give you a reference to the wholly owned whorehouse next door . There are few financial writ ers with Sykes's startling turn of phrase. Some others would have made a meal of the story bury ing the reader in a maze of ac counts and money trails with out bringing it to life. Sykes has a daring adventur ous style that makes the book hard to put down. He does not pussyfoot about. For example, he says that Bell Resources was looted of over SI billion but no-one was ever charged. And he says that one of Australia's major ex ports in the early 1990s were former high-flying corporate cowboys, like Abe Goldberg and Skase, who were fleeing the country to avoid being questioned. In an interview with Tne Canberra Times, Sykes ex-, plained the difficulty facing fi nancial journalists trying to ex pose the excesses of the late 1980s. He said that long before the stockmarket crash of the late, 1980s he believed Alan Bond was broke but he asked himself who am 1 to question this, man the banks are falling over to' loan money to, who is court-! ed by the Prime Minister, and a national hero after heading the America's Cup winning syndicate. Journalists had to be ex tremely careful under Austra lia's libel laws. They noted that the leader of the South Australian Demo crats, lan Gilfillan, who having raised questions about the business dealings of the State Bank of South Australia was fined several thousand dollars and gagged from criticising the bank. Gilfillan was eventually proved correct but the verdict against him remained. Sykes claims that the media advisers of John Bannon's La bor Government worked over time to defend the bank and discredit the Opposition. The corporate cowboys had friends in high places and jour nalists could not do a lot if the accounts were fudged. On the other hand, he says, some journalists were too starry-eyed and were accused of making heroes of the bold riders. The journalist's role was to probe and pose the question does it make sense and if it does not seem to make sense it usually does not . SYKES concedes that he had problems dealing with Skase, a former journalistic colleague and an old friend. It is one of Sykes's strengths that he admits his own frailties. His first glance at the bal ance sheet convinced him that Skase's company, Qintex, was stretched as thin as a ware with massive debt and a skimpy coverage. He has some twinges of con science that he did not tackle his old friend fiat out but at the same time he did not praise Skase. . According to Sykes, Qintex actually told the truth in its balance sheets and this was a further reflection on the finan cial institutions that continued to back him. Sykes is convinced that Aus tralia had not learnt a lesson from financial disasters. There had been regular fi nancial busts since the first settlement and man does learn from the past . However, he believes the problems of financial excesses could be eased by a retreat from financial deregulation. He says the liquid assets and government securities (LGS) ratio and the statutory reserve deposits should be reimposed upon the banks. These determined the finan cial backing the banks had be hind their lending and levels ot deposits they had kept with the Reserve Bank. Both could be adjusted to tighten or ease lending whereas today the Gov ernment's only tool is changes in interest rates and this can be rather blunt and does not stop the speculators from heavy borrowings in an eco nomic upturn. Sykes wants legal reform to end the situation where it can takes years to record a convic tion and punish a person for fi nancial fraud. This, he says, keeps those charged in the spotlight and makes it hard for Australia to improve its corporate image. The Bold Riders. Behind Australia's Corporate Collapses. By Trevor Sykes. Allen & Unwin, 651 pp, trp 45.
  83. 1994-10-07 Article 118289971, score 8.59016 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DAVID JULL,   NEIL PICKARD,   JOHN SHARP,   KEATING MALCOLM MACKERRAS,   GARRIE GIBSON,   DON DOBIE,   JOHN HOWARD,   PAUL KEATING,   DAVID BEDDALL,   MALCOLM MACKERRAS,   BOB HAWKE,   MARY CRAWFORD,   GARETH EVANS,   BOB HALVERSON,   BOB MCMULLAN,   PETER WALSH
    Organisations UNIVERSITY OF NSW,   LABOR,   NEW ZEALAND LABOUR PARTY,   HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,   SENATE,   AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE ACADEMY,   LABOR PARTY,   UNIVERSITY COLLEGE,   LABOR PARTY NATIONAL CONFERENCE
    Locations SOUTH AUSTRALIA,   BENNELONG,   CANBERRA,   QUEENSLAND,   MORETON,   HOBART,   NEW ZEALAND,   KAKADU NATIONAL PARK
    Misc POLITICS,   OLYMPIC DAM,   LIBERALS,   DEMOCRATS
    Backing quotas will come to haunt Keating MALCOLM MACKERRAS says the ALP's affirmative-action decision will be damaging electorally. THE LABOR Party National Conference last week in Hobart was preceded by commentators generally expecting it to be a success for Paul Keating in contrast to the June 1991 Centenary National Conference which was expected to be a debacle for Bob Hawke. The 1991 conference was a disaster for Bob Hawke personally. However, we now know that Labor won the subsequent federal election under a different leader. Consequently, and being wise after the event, we can say that the conference was a success, for the party while being a major setback for its then Prime Minister who lost his leadership later that year. When we reach June 1996 what will be our assessment of the September 1994 conference? First, we will know that the party was led into the next election by the leader at that conference, Keating: second, we will be able to assess whether the Prime Minister displayed good or bad political judgment at that conference. In my opinion he displayed bad judgment. Therefore, I think that conference will go down in history as Keating's Fightback! Remember how well that document was received when handed down in November 1991. However, its initial reception was a very poor guide to its final reputation. Only two decisions of the September 1994 conference will be remembered by history: the quota for female parlia- mentarians and the decision not to change uranium policy. Keating would, have displayed good political judgment if, from the very beginning, he had made it clear that he opposed both any change to uranium policy and affirmative action for women. Had he done that he would not have been seen as a humiliated loser on uranium. He would also have stopped his party from foisting on it self the affirmative-action policy which is obviously going to be damaging to Labor electorally. The essential point about the affir mative-action decision is that the Labor Party is going to be forced to make an early decision on this key question. Is the policy a trick? Or is it a simple case of discrimination based on sex? Either decision damages the reputation of Labor. I have no doubt which way the party will jump. It simply cannot allow people to say this is all a trick. There fore, Labor must implement its rules unfairly against men and be seen to By a nice irony, on the very day the Hobart conference quite correctly humiliated Keating on uranium, on the same day the current-account deficit blew out to its highest in five years, the Queensland Redistribution Com- missioners decided the map for the 26 seats in that state at the 1996 election. Unbeknown to Paul Keating his party had, two days earlier and acting on his advice, thrown to the Liberals the present Labor seats of Forde and Moreton. Mary Crawford (Forde) and Garrie Gibson (Moreton) have seen their seats weakened for Labor to the point that both are on a knife-edge. In the good old days when Labor, like the Liberals, had a non-discriminatory policy, common sense would have forced both male and female incumbents to contest the present seat on the basis that each is winnable. The Labor rule is that a winnable seat is one needing a 5 per cent swing. IS LABOR to stand female candidates at the next federal election in Bennelong (John Howard's seat needing a swing of 3.2 per cent for Labor to win), Hume (John Sharp on 3.8), Fadden (David Jull on 4.8), Casey (Bob Halverson on 4.4) and Cook (Don Dobie on 3.5), pretending that these are winnable? If Labor were to stand female candidates for such seats while simultane- ously organising Holt (safety margin 10.8 per cent) for Gareth Evans the whole policy would be seen to be a trick. That cannot be allowed. Now come back to the problem of Gibson and Crawford. The latter thinks she should be given a better seat, Rankin, which is held by David Beddall and has been strengthened to need a 13.4 per cent swing to fall. She has, in my opinion, an unassailable case. (Had Paul Keating thrown his weight the other way at Hobart, Crawford would have had no case). The new Rankin contains 39,624 electors from the old Rankin and 32,709 from the old Forde, a total of 72,333. The Queensland branch will not stop Crawford from being the next Member for Rankin. Beddall will become the Neil Pickard of the Keating Government. Crawford is already talking about federal intervention in Queensland affairs to ensure she gets a safe seat. So there. Safe seats are to be reserved for women. Otherwise the Labor Party will be accused of not being serious about the new policy. We saw what happened when Senator Bob McMullan foolishly suggested that the third ACT seat should be reserved for a woman. The idea went down in an opinion poll like a lead balloon. Within a few days of the cheering and the flowers at the national conference this policy has started to go off the rails. Moreover the situation will get worse. Whatever possessed the Prime Minister to back it? My answer is that Keating is a man of poor political judgment but very caught up in the need to be trendy. He believed he had to prove possession of the vision thing , so he fell for a scheme which is going to be a disaster for his party. It needs to be remembered that the New Zealand Labour Party gave thorough consideration to this idea before deciding to reject it. The view which prevailed was that every possible en- couragement be given to women but no quotas be imposed. BEFORE the November 1993 New Zealand general election there were seven Labour women in their House of Representatives. Now there are 14. If they can double the number, without imposing a quota, why did Australian Labor need to resort to this? I come now to the uranium question. Whatever one thinks of the merits of Labor allowing only two mines (Ranger in the Northern Territory and Olympic Dam in South Australia) it was, and is, quite obvious that the party's electoral interests were best served by keeping that policy. At first glance the mystery is how Keating ever came to think otherwise. My theory is that he and I have different ideas about electoral history. My view is that Labor won an unwinnable election in March 1990, Hawke's last. The critical feature of the 1990 victory was that Labor made a conscious decision to allow its primary vote to fall in order to help the Democrats and the Greens (or, at least, realising that such would happen). It then hoped it would scramble back on preferences in the House of Representatives whilst bolstering minor parties of the Left in the Senate. It did that through a high-profile pro-environment campaign replete with pretty pictures of Kakadu National Park and the rest. Had the June 1988 Hobart national conference reversed Labor's anti-uranium policy (as Peter Walsh, for example, had long wanted) it would have ruined the 1990 strategy. It would appear that Keating identifies the unwinnable election to have been March 1993, not March 1990. I wonder where he obtained that idea. Of course, he was leader by then. My view is that Hewson simply gave the House of Representatives election to Labor and Keating can claim only minor credit. His contribution to the election outcome was to bungle the Senate election for Labor. In short, our present Prime Minister is a man of whom it can be said that there is less to him than meets the eye. Malcolm Mackerras is Senior Lecturer in Politics, University College, University of NSW, at the Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra.
  84. 1994-04-04 Article 118111171, score 8.558853 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People CRISPIN HULL,   STU ART LITTLEMORE,   BILL MANDLE,   JOHN HOWARD
    Organisations INDUSTRY AND TRADE PRACTICES COMMISSIONS
    Locations CANBERRA,   AUSTRALIA
    CRISPIN HULL Problem is with quality of infill THE INDUSTRY and Trade Practices Commis sions have conducted half a dozen major inquiries over the past few years. Nearly all of them have been into the people we love to hate: oil companies, real-estate agents and lawyers for example. (Journalists, among those Stu art Littlemore and others love to hate, incidentally, have rightly escaped their attention, for we have a fairly open profession. Ring-ins like John Howard and Bill Mandle are permitted). The commissions are out to get monopolies. They hate laws which give the professions exclu sive practice rights, high entry requirements and expensive in club practices. Indeed, it is now at a stage that I cannot see why the com missions should bother with ex pensive inquiries. You can be reasonably confident of what their findings will be on any topic: repeal all special laws per taining to that industry or pro fession, allow others in to do at least some of the work, lower professional entry standards, in sist on uniform standards across the states, allow practitioners to move between states and to rely on general trade-practices provi sions to ensure competition, truthful advertising and consum er protection. All very commendable stuff. But it can be taken too far. And there is another side of the coin. Sometimes, the legisla ture says people have to be pro tected from themselves. Thus backyard appendectomies are frowned upon. Sometimes, the legislature says people have to be protected from each other. Thus only a certified mechanic can pass a car for registration. And conditions can change. A professional monopoly justified yesterday might be no longer justifiable today. Equally, where no professional, monopoly was required yesterday, it might be today. Technology gets easier, to use, so a dental techni-: cian can whip up a set of false teeth without six years of den tistry training. Property-law sim-. plification and computer title searching make it unnecessary for a conveyancer to have five , years' legal training. The point of this column is to argue that conditions in town planning have got to a stage that it is time to impose some sort of architectural standards upon people wanting to build within the city limits. The common law has always been that a man (last century it invariably was a man) could do what he liked with his own land: build as high or dig as deep as he liked. In a land like Australia it seemed not to matter what people did with their land. Now, however, the population has grown and governments do not seem to have any population policy to stop it. More and more people are living in smaller spaces, especial ly in the cities, and governments are encouraging it. People are living closer to each other. This means the buildings they are in have to be designed better to avoid noise, sight and other im pacts from close neighbours. It also means that if governments permit extra building within the old 1960s quarter-acre-block' areas, neighbours can be pro-' foundly affected. Canberra's present infill argu ment is not so much about infill per se, but about the quality of the infill. The trouble is, builders are getting drafters to do the de sign, or worse are doing it them selves. A builder might be an excel lent constructor. The building might never fall down, but that is a different skill from design. Moreover, bad design does not just affect the person doing the extension or the people who choose to buy a new townhouse in a redevelopment zone. It af fects all the neighbours. People have to be protected from their neighbours' bad de sign, and perhaps their own. Perhaps it is time to look at compulsory architecture: no planning approval without plans being signed off by an architect. Or, if not signed off, planning authorities should make it clear the plans will be scrutinised in detail and rejected if badly de signed. Sure, some architects are lousy, but most architects are better at architecture than most builders. The result can only be an improvement. And in the long run it may be cheaper. The savings in energy and social costs of cramming people into badly designed dwel-. lings would more than pay for the architecture. But don't tell' the Industry and Trade Practices Commissions.
  85. 1994-08-24 Article 118264496, score 8.514817 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN LEWIS,   ERIC ANDERSON,   HENRY VI,   JOHN RAE,   PRINCE WILLIAM,   PRINCE CHARLES,   TIM CARD,   GAY PADGHAM,   CHRISTOPHER BANTICK
    Organisations ST CLARE'S COLLEGE,   WESTMINSTER,   ETON COLLEGE,   ACT SCHOOLS AUTHORITY DESIGN,   ETON,   ETON RENEWED,   GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL
    Locations LONDON,   AUSTRALIA,   MANSFIELD,   GEELONG GRAMMAR,   ETON,   VICTORIA,   CAMBRIDGE,   NEW ZEALAND,   GEELONG
    Misc OLD TESTAMENT,   MATHS,   TIMBERTOP,   GEELONG GRAMMAR,   ANGLICAN,   ENGLISH-SPEAKING,   NON-BRITISH,   ENGLISH,   BRITISH
    EDUCATION PERSPECTIVE A return to the Old School CHRISTOPHER BANTICK catches the headmaster of Geelong Grammar as he prepares to leave for Eton College. TODAY. John Lewis, headmaster or Geelong Grammar School, will address the school assembly for the final time. Next month, he will take over the headship of Eton College. For Mr Lewis, this will not.be such a new thing. He taught at Eton from 1971 until 1980, after winning a double first in classics at Cambridge. He was only 38 when he took over at Geelong Grammar, for what has become an interlude of 14 years before his return to Eton. John Lewis is trim and 51, the right age for a change to arguably the finest school in the English-speaking world. His credentials are impeccable for the post. Geelong Grammar, whose Timbertop campus, in the alpine country above Mansfield in Victoria, was attended by Prince Charles in 1966, is commonly viewed as the Eton of Australia. Moreover, John Lewis's Cambridge ;ind Eton background (he was in charge of college, a particular house for tugs , an Eton expression for outstandingly gifted boys) should equip him admirably for the role of leading what is the quint essential English public school. Eton was established in 1440 by Henry VI and in the school's five centuries of history, New Zealand-born Mr Lewis is the first non-British headmaster. This, perhaps will add to a role which is already in the public eye. Even though he has been there before, the British establishment will be keenly observing and assessing his performance. Not least since Prince William is due to begin at the school. The simple reason for high public interest in who heads Eton is because of the special place Eton has, not only in the fabric of British conservative public life, but also the distinctive role Eton College has in British private-school education. . This was neatly summed up by John Rae, former headmaster of Westminster a major London private school soon after the announcement of John Lewis's appointment. How Mr Lewis decides to play his influential hand will help to determine whether the unity of the independent sector can be maintained. Independent schools look to Eton for leadership in another sense. Whether the other schools like it or not, Eton is the flagship. If Eton's self confidence falters or its stan-: dards fall, the credibility of the independent sector may be called into question. I spoke to John Lewis as he prepared to leave Geelong Grammar. It took some time to arrange the interview. He has been in great demand for the various expected farewells before his valedictory assembly today. He sees his departure from the school as being personally costly, yet he is a realist and believes he holds no unique place at Geelong. Geelong is a love affair. I am stirred by a terrible wrench of going. I am not irreplaceable. One of the telling roles of headship is how impossible it is! Some things do happen, some don't or can't! Although having already spent time at Eton as a master, being its head will be very different. As he prudently reflects on his anticipated arrival, John Lewis offers the measured comments of one used to being deft at public relations. Something he is well aware will be required at Eton. There are certain expectations on you at Eton. This is not wholly foreign territory. I know full well that the job will be more challenging and complex. I can't pretend to be fully abreast of the changes in the British education scene. Yet, you never know about a job until you do it. I know Eton is a hard-working school. I have seen more clearly now, how it has worked out many of the an swers to the process of education.- Eton's and Geelong's ethos are similar. Both schools take pupils from a range of loca tions. Both believe in the merits of a re- sidential community. GEELONG Grammar and Eton-College are Anglican schools. This is for him a significant element of continuity. Quite apart from needing to be familiar with the traditions of Anglican ism, John Lewis sees this in a personal way. Both Eton and Geelong place significant store in the opportunity for the ex- ploration of faith. To me, this is hugely important. I'm not sure how else you explore the beyond the unmundane, except in the context of the tradition we inherit. John Lewis knows that he will follow, the outspoken and at times softly con- troversial former head of Eton, Eric Anderson. In a recent address, prior to de parting from Eton, he said, As guardians of civilised values we must, like Old Testament prophets, tell people truths they do not want to hear, that there are higher standards than those which most people find good enough and that the effort to reach them is worthwhile. Vibeke and John Lewis: There are certain expectations on you at Eton. Inherited beliefs like this, which rightly or wrongly place Eton in the role of custodian of the future, will be demanding as will the observance of the great weight of tradition which underpins much of Eton. Something John Lewis's wife, Vibeke, has begun to explore in reading a new book, Eton Renewed, A History from 1860 to the Present Day, by Tim Card. It's a book which is written virtually entirely from the perspective of an Eton insider. John Lewis remarked that his wife had beaten him to it! One characteristic becomes undeniably apparent when talking to John Lewis. He is a modest, visionary teacher who cares about his pupils and the school they attend. He will take this with him to Eton and he will leave this in the hearts, minds and memories of those who farewell a fine pedagogue and headmaster today in Geelong. The secrets behind a good design By GAY PADGHAM A DESIGN is not a creative vision which appears magically on a piece of paper. It is the result of a problem-solving process which, if followed, enables you to produce a design which stands up to the hard light of day. Design is fundamental to many fields such as publishing, public relations, ad- vertising, car manufacture, clothing, and textiles. So, how do you create a good design proposal? Just as you use an algorithm to solve a Maths problem, you can use a design process to come up with a good solution to a design problem. There are as many different design me- thodologies as there are designers, but all follow a similar path. A design process makes a complex task manageable by breaking it down into separate steps. You begin with a design brief. This can be given by'your teacher, or by your client or, in some .circumstances, you identify the problem; and write your own brief. Start by working out the parameters of the problem. These are the unavoidable constraints vithin which a solution must be reached. They will differ according to ON COURSE the nature of the problem but a useful checklist to follow includes: How much money do you have to spend? How much money will your client be prepared to pay for the product? What must the design solution actually do? What task must it perform to be ef fective? Are there any safety requirements which must be observed? What materials and construction methods would be ap propriate? How long must it last? How long do you have to solve the problem? The next stage is to research. Do you need any additional information to solve the problem? Information about materi als, production techniques, ergonomics or user requirements? Gather all the infor mation . and then look at existing solu tions. Has this problem been solved be fore? Examine the existing solutions critically. Which are the essential factors of these designs? But do not let existing solutions restrict your thinking. Explore other possibilities, too. Conceptualisation: the stage where you let the ideas flow. Start with a blank sheet of paper and sketch any possible solutions that come to mind. Generate as many possibilities as you can. Do not al low anything to halt the flow of your thinking. Sketch every idea, even if it seems impractical or unrealistic. After about 10 minutes you will prob ably find that you have run out of ideas. Stop and evaluate. Look at your sketches and identify the good possibilities. Get input from others designing is a team activity. Ask those around you to help you pinpoint the ideas which aTe worth developing. Often other people can per ceive factorsyou had not considered. When you have selected two or three of the most promising ideas, develop these concepts further. Produce drawings to show the possible appearance, materi als, construction and surface finish. A good standard of drawing skill is helpful to enable you to visualise the item in de tail and to communicate your ideas to others. Present your completed concept drawings to your teacher, colleagues or client for their opinions and select the best concept. The next stage depends upon the na ture of the item being designed. You may need to produce a model to check the proposed construction method or to com municate your idea in more detail or pro duce specification drawings showing ma terials and dimensions. Effective presentation of your design is most important. You have to sell your concept to the teacher, your colleagues or your client. Ensure that your drawings are clear and well-produced and describe the visual appearance of the design in de tail. Do not forget to include essential in formation such as material and dimen sions and internal construction. Make sure that any models you have made are well-constructed and well-finished. A successful design is a combination of many interrelated factors and there is no one method of achieving it. However, fol lowing a design procedure similar to the one above, helps the creative process along and should enable you-to come up with a great solution. Gay Padgham is a professional graphic de-. signer who teaches in design and tech nology at St Clare's College. She chairs the ACT Schools Authority Design and Tech nology Panel.
  86. 1994-03-01 Article 118155075, score 8.316109 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN HEWSON,   MRS KELLY,   CHERYL KERNOT,   LEO MCLEAY,   JOHN LANGMORE,   STUART HAMILTON,   PETER COSTELLO,   JOHN TAYLOR
    Organisations LABOR,   HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,   ROS MARGO KINGSTON,   COALITION,   SENATE,   NSW RIGHT
    Misc AUDIT ACT,   DEMOCRATS,   DEMOCRAT
    Time finally runs out for Ros MARGO KINGSTON chronicles Mrs Kelly's accelerating slide into oblivion over the sports rorts affair John Hewson: As every day goes by we will raise more and more details of more and more of these grants and this is a cancer it's going to eat them up. (November 1993.) BESIDES Kelly, there were four major figures behind her decline and fall: NSW Right heavy Leo McLeay (representing the tribal loyalties of his and her faction), Democrats leader Cheryl Kernot, Auditor-General John Taylor, and Opposition finance spokesman Peter Costello. Taylor played hard, to assert his authority in the face of strong anti-Labor feeling. Kernot played hard, to press her 1994 theme of accountability, and show why everyone needs a Democrat in the Senate. Costello played hard, to assert his power as prosecutor, and his prowess as the fresh down-market operator the party needs as leader. McLeay was the mates representative, on the committee to ignore the evidence and assert might, not right. Each upped the ante at key moments, when momentum could have been lost. The trouble began on Tuesday, November 16, with the publication of Taylor's horror report on her administration of a 30 million sports-grants program she had spent just before the election without a document on why she ticked some and crossed others. Kelly faced sustained attack in Question Time, where she made the mistake that would eventually expose her. Rather than admit the truth that she had had absolute discretion to do what she liked with the 30 million and used it Kelly insisted that the scheme was fair. The Opposition had for months ignored embarrassing government stuffups in its incestuous leadership obsession. This time the party rallied. The Government had bought the election, and they were going to prove it. Kernot's first move was to deny Opposition demands for Senate Estimates to be recalled. Instead she forced the Government to move forward a House of Representatives committee inquiry from February to December. Costello coined the term sports rorts , and within a week the rorts were beginning to show. A never-ending series of examples of discrepancies and biased treatment followed, which would entangle senior ministers in Kelly's web. The Government, courtesy of its NSW Right dominance, made no attempt to examine the substance in the urge to protect its own. Keating's first tack was baseless claims of sexism, that the Opposition was taking the callous view that you can shout a woman down . Kelly just kept parroting: I repeat again to this House that this program is run on a needs basis. And it is run.on a needs basis . But after the first flush of reports, media interest waned to a few news papers. Television was unexcited. Old news. Too complicated. Nothing would ever happen to Ros anyway. Government Members said she'd stay because she'd done what she did for them, and that, for most, was where it ended. On December 16, Taylor and Kelly's department head, Stuart Hamilton, appeared before the committee. It was dodge-and-shuffle time, with Hamilton briefed incessantly by Kelly staff in the breaks. That night, at least one TV station said the issue was over. But Hamilton had given one vital piece of evidence: that only Kelly knew why her decisions had been made. That night at a traumatic committee hearing, McLeay felt he could not shut out Opposition demands to call Kelly. He brokered what he thought was a clever compromise: the committee would ask her some questions in writing, for her reply next year. Hopefully, the issue would be then be dead. But the department had produced reams of material which, with hard work and tip-offs, would corner Kelly. Keating was so contemptuous of the issue that on December 23 he promoted Kelly to the highly sensitive position of his women's adviser. In retrospect, if he had not been so blindly arrogant, he could have moved her out of Sport, declared her duly punished, and salvaged credibility. Over Christmas Costello analysed files and sent off Fol requests. Taylor sent a new submission, telling the committee it should do its job or herald the end of accountability and the death of democracy. Kelly claimed she had kept all details of grant applications, nearly 2000 of them, in her head. On February 3, McLeay bowed yet again to Opposition outrage. He refused to allow Kelly to be called, but agreed to a private meeting with Taylor that night. All gloves off, Taylor declared the program an easy-money scheme attracting fraud like flies around a carcase . Hamilton's evidence was clearly rubbish . From February 6 Costello began a daily drop of damaging documents implicating Keating in the scheme, Kelly in a cover-up, and yet more concrete rorts. Keating said the issue was an absolute, abject waste of time . Kernot moved in, threatening a Senate inquiry which would call Kelly staff and other key witnesses blackballed by Labor. In a last attempt at damage control, Kelly agreed to give evidence to the committee late next day. The infamous great big whiteboard overshadowed a reasonable performance, although later many of her assurances, especially that she had never seen an ineligible grant, would haunt her. . The whiteboard saw sports rorts explode into public consciousness, triggered a new joke genre, led to comparisons with the poor old voter who had to keep every little receipt for the tax man, and saw lots of people start ringing the Opposition with new sports rorts. Still Keating defended, saying he made his big decisions on a doodle pad . That defence lasted a day. Kernot renewed her threat. Last Tuesday Kelly was humiliated, admitting she had approved an ineligible grant. Her Medigate performance was so awful that Labor backbenchers began telling reporters she had to go. Still, Keating backed Kelly. No-one was game to advise him otherwise. Thursday saw the Coalition's highrisk play after a passionate tactics meeting. The decision to forgo questions and call an immediate censure on Keating was made to get Hewson into the play. The same old leadership thing. The momentum of the campaign, and Hewson's leadership, was at risk after a poor speech. Only when the public gallery burst into applause in support of the Opposition was Hewson saved, and Kelly gone. A stunned Keating backed off. He discovered the virtue of process and said he would wait for the committee report. Yesterday, a pale and diminished Keating did not say why he was letting Kelly go. He had left himself without a line to justify his abandonment of her cause. John Langmore delivered an unprecedented House of Representatives committee report highly critical of a Government minister. Taylor got a new Audit Act shafting him delayed. McLeay proved he couldn't fix certain problems. Kernot set her accountability theme in concrete. Costello became a real leadership contender. And no-one will volunteer to run the Government's next slush fund.
  87. 1994-11-18 Article 130538335, score 8.296947 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN FAULKNER,   KEITH WILLIAMS,   SADDAM HUSSEIN,   SADDAM HUS SEIN,   SADDAM HUS,   ROLF EKEUS
    Organisations GOSS LABOR,   COMMONWEALTH,   UNITED NATIONS,   HINCHINBROOK CHANNEL,   UNITED NATIONS SE CURITY COUNCIL,   SEA WORLD
    Locations HIN CHINBROOK CHANNEL,   FRANCE,   BAGHDAD,   QUEENSLAND,   SAUDI ARABIA,   AUSTRALIA,   HAMILTON ISLAND,   GREAT BARRIER REEF,   RUSSIA,   IRAQ,   PORT HINCHINBROOK,   UNITED STATES
    Misc AMERICANS,   IRAQIS,   KURDISH,   AMERICAN,   IRAQI,   KURDS
    CThr (ftanbrrra (Eimrs Moonlight raids on mangroves THE PORT Hinchinbrook affair is an object lesson in how not to . run . a na tional environment policy.. The Minister for the Environment, John Faulkner, took action this week, belatedly some say, to stop the destruction of man groves on the site of a proposed ' resort at the entrance to Hin chinbrook Channel in north Queensland. Late on Tuesday night he obtained a proclama tion banning the destruction of the mangroves, but the develop er, Keith Williams, was ahead of , him. His workers were hacking down the mangroves by moon light. It took, it seems, four hours for Williams to get word to the bulldozers- to stop by when virtually all the man ' groves had gone. Williams, who under the Bjelke-Petersen regime once had ! legislative backing to virtually do what he liked with his two major tourist projects, Hamilton Island and Sea World, is used to getting his own way and has found the Goss Labor Govern ' ment smiling kindly on develop ers and not that apparently stressed by possible risks to the . environment. We now have the odd situation where a state La bor Premier and a former stout supporter of Sir Joh Bjelke-Pe tersen,-one of the so-called white'shoe brigade , are on the same side against Faulkner. The Premier and the develop er are accusing the minister of actions that will stifle develop ment in Australia. They are also saying, and not without some justice, that the Commonwealth had ample opportunity to put its views about, or to impose re - strictions upon, the project, long before a commitment had been made to the investment. If the greenies are annoyed by ' Williams and Goss they could also be annoyed by Senator Faulkner. His late-night dash to save the mangroves was futile and we must all now await to see what damage will be wrought by the destruction of an area deemed by scientists as vital to protect the seagrass that provides a sanctuary for the du gong and other endangered spe cies. Williams wants to dredge the Hinchinbrook Channel', the home of an endangered dolphin, several rare turtles and the du gong, but the channel is also considered part of the Great Barrier Reef and who knows what damage would be wrought on the reef and the marine life if dredging went ahead. There are those who claim that the Great Barrier Reef re gion is already over-developed. There are too many resorts, too many people being brought on to sensitive areas. The last thing the area needs is another resort like the mas sive Williams proposal for Port Hinchinbrook, especially one that has already caused the de struction of more than 4ha of mangroves and demands chan nel dredging. Australia has a duty to preserve the grandeur of the barrier reef and has to put this task ahead of the demands of developers and their friends in the state Government.. This means acting early to stop environmental damage and knowing exactly what the Com monwealth's powers are and what has been agreed. We do not want a repeat of the current situation where Goss says that Senator Faulkner approved of the mangrove clearance while Senator Faulkner says that he had no such power and could act only against a threat to the reef heritage area. There must be more precision in environmental protection be fore more mangroves disappear by moonlight. Saddam a loser again PRESIDENT Saddam Hus sein's protestations of coop x eration have been given short shrift by the United Nations Se curity Council with its decision to maintain the economic sanc tions on that country/Moreover; . there seems little likelihood that any action from Saddam Hus sein, short of abdication, will persuade the Americans to change their, minds. The decision came earlier this week after an official UN report which questioned the bona fides of the Iraqis in dealing with weapons inspection. Weapons commission head Rolf Ekeus told the council he had evidence of the continued existence and concealment of undeclared weap ons and the means for their de livery . He did not specify the evidence and no doubt the Ira qis would argue that it is impos sible for them to prove the non-existence of hidden weap ons. However, Ekeus is an expe rienced and responsible operator in this field and his report must be respected. Nevertheless, it must be said that the United States is taking a harder line on the matter than any of its major allies. Indeed, France has joined Russia to urge that the oil embargo be lifted after a six-month testing period of a UN monitoring sys tem to ensure Baghdad's long-term disarmament. It seems that the oil issue is central. If the embargo on Iraqi exports were lifted the world price would fall, much to' the detrimerit;,;of Saudi Arabia which has still to repay the 13 billion3 'it owes 'the US for the short Desert Storm war in 1991. The US argues that the UN reso lutions already provide for the export of a limited amount of oil to pay for food and medical supplies but that Iraq has not taken advantage of them. In stead, the Iraqi Government has been spending precious foreign exchange on palaces for Saddam Hussein. . A further complaint is that Saddam has been applying his own economic embargo to the Kurds in the' north of his coun try. The UN has declared the northern Kurdish region a safe haven from Saddam's forces; whether he can be forced simul taneously to supply the Kurds with food from his scarce supplies is somewhat question able. In any case, the embargo is notoriously ineffective. The Iraqis claim that with their formal recognition of Ku wait this week, all the precondi tions have now been met for the UN to relieve their .worsening economic plight. In truth, the only action guar anteed to produce an American change of heart is the only one Saddam Hussein cannot contem plate his own departure.
  88. 1994-05-12 Article 118210973, score 8.197535 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People SALMAN RUSHDIE,   PAUL JOHNSON,   JOHN MAJOR,   PHILIP LAR,   NICK SEROTA,   NEAL ASCHERSON
    Organisations HOUSE OF LORDS,   NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE,   CIVIL SERVICE,   COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL SALVATION,   LABOUR
    Locations ENGLAND,   ITALY,   CALAIS,   BRITAIN,   BRUSSELS,   DOVER,   GREECE
    Misc ENGLISH TORIES,   CARIBBE ANS,   ITALIANS,   ISLANDISM,   SPANISH,   IRISH,   GREEKS,   ANGLICAN,   PORTUGUESE,   BRITISH
    Going potty about Britain By NEAL ASCHERSON GOOD pamphlet is a mis sile. It flies through the air jL 9l with a graceful, skimming trajectory and hits a pompous twerp in the eye. The best recipe for a pamphlet is a first-class literary education fried in controlled fury. Paul Johnson, whose Wake Up Britain! is just out, has the recipe. Paul Johnson's talent for polem ic, once left-wing and now right wing, is justly famous. He is an an gry, kindly, upright man. His words are clean and hard, their rhythm exhilarating. He enjoyed writing this book, and the enjoyment is in fectious. The trouble is that most of what he writes is potty. Britain, he declares, is going to the dogs or at least into a grey ish hell of decline. Declaring him self an old man, he looks back to the virtuous land of his youth in the 1930s, and asks where those virtues, that grandeur, have gone? How did it come about that his grandchildren have been robbed of that ancient Britain, robust, salu brious and sterling ? Instead, they must grow up in a world which is unrestrained, foul-mouthed, garish, defiled, vicious and often plain evil . This kind of lament is familiar. Most right-wing polemic starts like this. But Paul Johnson does not de spair. If he did, he would be no good as a pamphleteer, whose knack is to say that there is still just time to save the country from the scoundrels who are push ing it over the edge. He believes that the British hate what is hap pening to them and can be induced to defy it. There follows the naming of guilty men and women. There are a lot. They include Labour govern ments, trade unionists, the National Health Service, the Civil Service mandarins, John Major and his Government, the penal reform lob by, the opponents of capital pun ishment, lenient judges, juvenile criminals, the mass media, the quangos, the Irish, the Caribbe ans , West Africans, Spanish, Greeks, Portuguese and Italians (the last six being social-security scroungers trained by the lristi). New Age travellers, organised teachers, mothers raising children on welfare, the House of Lords, Anglican bishops, literary prize committees, architects, Salman Rushdie, Nick Serota, Philip Lar kin, Brussels bureaucrats... To stop here is unfair to John son, but my space is limited. But the list is so long that it is practi cally a census. The healthy, decent British who do not fall into one of these categories must be a minority, even an endangered species. Paul Johnson divides the nation into two. There are the chattering classes , who run everything and are responsible for all evil. Then come the rest, the taciturn classes who he assumes to be boiling with suppressed resentment. The chatter ers have brought Britain down into the mud. The empire is gone, great-power status is gone, our sov ereign Parliament is going fast . The streets have grown unsafe for children. The Church of England, once a guardian of morals, does no more than blather trendily. The television gushes filth. But now comes the surprise. This kind of analysis usually ends in a call for a Committee of National Salvation to sweep subversion from the land with an iron broom. Paul Johnson, in contrast, calls for more democracy. Hope rises suddenly only to be dashed again. What he means by democracy, it turns out, is a new Tory party which will rule in much the same old way, but will somehow express the general will by listening to general prejudice: xe nophobic, punitive, benighted. The new party, will be a party of civi lised nationalism , to reassert sov ereignty and lead the masses of Eu rope in a continental rebellion against the menace of federalism . It seems to me, putting down this long pamphlet or short book, that Paul Johnson and I have lived in different countries. I am not much younger than he is. I have seen many of the changes and the van ished ways of life that he has. But in almost all that has changed, where he perceives only decay, I have watched an enormous raising up, as millions of human beings have risen from confining degrada tion or dim, deferential narrowness into the light. Freedom, which is both release from poverty and the gaining of the power to realise what is within an individual, is of ten misused. But if it were not mis usable, it would not be freedom. Much is wrong with Britain. Most of it is the consequence of ar chaic, oppressive traditions of gov ernment which still bind a people which has grown wiser and more independent. The British state, with its old traditions of sovereignty and secrecy, must go to the scrap-heap. Islandism , the ideology which as sociates all that is. good in Britain with the distance from Dover to Calais, is no longer even a joke. But Paul Johnson, incredibly, wants more sovereignty, more Channel, rather than less. Worst of all is the rhetoric about chattering classes . These arc just the same imaginary pests whom English Tories used to call pseudo intellectuals , and the term itself is not important (although I have al ways been amused by the idea that plain folk in Britain communicate in dark, Lawrentian grunts and monosyllables). But look at the im plication! The healthy, natural con dition of the human race is stasis. Change is no more than an infec tion by insolent cliques of heretics who dare to have new thoughts. Democracy , in Johnson's plan, is no more than a return to the mythified past, and a populist swat ting of all those who criticise it. England is best, or rather always was best. England invented democ racy. Italy and Greece are coun tries with no tradition of freedom . Paul Johnson calls his book Wake Up Britain!. But in reality he is telling Britain to stop chattering and go back to sleep. This is strange. His sort of writing has al ways kept people awake, and yet he is condemning his own style of po lemic to silence. The IrKfependent
  89. 1994-03-17 Article 118158483, score 8.197437 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN TURN,   IAN CAUSLEY,   NEVILLE GILL,   JOHN SOUTHERN,   BOB MAR,   BRUCE WARD,   MARK WARD
    Organisations FAR SOUTH COAST ANGLERS' ASSOCIATION,   CANBERRA FISHERMAN'S CLUB,   NSW PARLIAMENT,   NSW FISHERIES,   SEALORD PRODUCTS LTD,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOR PARTY,   OPPOSITION,   NZ HIGH COURT,   NZ BUREAU OF RURAL RE,   SEALORD
    Locations NEW SOUTH WALES,   LAKE MULWALLA,   BROULCC,   BARLINGS BCACH,   AUSTRALIA,   BRAEMAR,   BUCKENDERRA,   NEW ZEALAND,   NUMERALLA
    Misc DOWNUNDER,   NZ ACT,   NEW ZEALANDCRS,   AB,   NAROOMA SPORTFISHING CONVEN,   NON-ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIANS,   MAORI,   ACT,   MAORIS
    SPORT NZ experience casts a long cloud over NSW proposals ANGLER'S ANGLE with John Turn bull V The NSW Minister for Agricul ture and Fisheries, Ian Causley, has accused the Labor Party of holding back reform of the fishing industry. He said in NSW Parliament last week that, contrary to claims by Opposition spokesman Bob Mar tin, foreign multinationals had not taken over the New Zealand fishing industry after the introduc tion of property rights. There arc two major compa nies in the New Zealand fishing industry, the biggest of which, Sea lord, is a New Zealand public com pany with a 20 per cent Maori shareholding, he said. The sec ond is Sanford, again an NZ com pany with Maori shareholding. Mr Causley said that attempts by Mr Martin to discredit propos als to manage NSW fisheries through the introduction of fisher ies property rights showed how out of touch he was. However, the Minister seems to be on shaky ground. Although New Zealand has a much smaller population than Australia, it has a much larger commercial fishing industry, worth about 1.2 billion annually, compared with NSW's 50 million. A considerable proportion of the NZ fisheries is now worked by foreign fishing boats chartered to NZ companies that are partly owned by foreign investors. Significantly, in 1992, the NZ High Court struck out a challenge to the NZ Director-General's deci sion to allow Sealord Products Ltd to retain its catch quota although 40 per cent of its shares were owned by foreign investors. The decision enabled Sealord to remain 40 per cent owned by over seas investors and retain its catch quota, provided total foreign shareholdings in the NZ fishing industry did not exceed 24.9 per cent, and no single foreign invest or held more than 24.9 per cent of Sealord shares, or was responsible for more than 25 per cent of the Sealord board. Although this High Court deci sion implies that the policy of the NZ Government is to limit foreign ownership of the NZ fishing in dustry to 24.9 per cent, another significant result was verification of the Director-General's powers to distribute catch quotas to com panies with a high proportion of overseas ownership, regardless of objections by NZ fishermen. Nor does the Act impose provisions on the Director-General to consult NZ fishermen before granting in creased ownership to overseas in vestors. Thus many New Zealandcrs see the new Act as having ceded a quarter of their fisheries to foreign owners, and an Act that may at any time result in even more fall ing into overseas hands. The prospect of similar legisla tion in Australia is alarming. Yet NSW Fisheries are at present pre paring legislation similar to the NZ Act and they intend to try to rush it through Parliament before the current sitting finishes. It is a frightening situation for both ama teur anglers and commercial fishermen, not least because many people are still unaware that such legislation is pending it is legislation that obvi ously requires careful scrutiny and consideration, not only because it means the loss of property rights to the general public, but because, if NZ is any example, of the dis ruption to the fishing industry which may be the result. The NZ Bureau of Rural Re sources has reported that after property rights were introduced, the overall trend was clearly to wards concentration of quotas in the hands of fewer operators; and that there has been a 37 per cent reduction in the number of small fishing boats. In the 1991-92 fishing season, NZ-owncd and operated boats caught only 41 per cent of the catch, while foreign vessels char tered to NZ companies caught 59 per cent. The catch, however, in creased, due to more efficient fish ing methods, which was a blow for anglers and conservationists. Is this the future for Australia's fisheries? In NZ, Maoris were granted a significant proportion of the fish eries under the property rights leg islation, which seems fair enough since they form a large proportion of the population and were the original owners. The NSW Gov ernment has not yet revealed their plans for such rights in this state. Given the trend with other Ab original land claims, however, the effect of the new Act could be that non-Aboriginal Australians who like to fish, swim, boat and picnic could be banned from large areas or made to pay for the privilege. All the many recreational and commcrcial fishers I have spoken to since this proposal was revealed agree that more time is needed for consideration and comment. . The Minister announced yes terday that more than 300 rock lobsters, some undersized, had been seized in raids since last year's introduction of a new li censing system and tagging pro gram designed to stamp out black marketeering. One fisherman has had his permit suspended pending court action, and another is facing court for trading lobsters on the black market. . The Canberra Fisherman's Club's Neville Gill won the recent Narooma Sportfishing Conven tion with a 68kg black marlin on a 10kg line, despite big seas and 50 knot winds. Kaleen's John Southern reports lots of small to medium-sized tai lor at Barlings Bcach near Broulcc at the weekend, and says the big seas have also brought the bream on the bite, with prawns and beach worms the best baits. Bruce Ward, of Numeralla, had good fishing at Buckenderra re cently, using mudeye baits from shore. A lot of small rainbow trout arc beginning to appear. Kambah's Mark Ward enjoyed good fishing for Murray cod at Lake Mulwalla recently, using Downunder deep-diving lures. Many fish were undersized, but one was a respectable 12kg. Snowy Mountains fishing is picking up with the cooler weath er, but is still nothing to rave about. The ACT and Far South Coast Anglers' Association held their freshwater competition at Buckenderra on the weekend, and the 70 competitors landed 67 trout, the best a brown weighing 2.35kg. The best trout fishing reported this week has been at Braemar, where 95 fish were weighed, the best a 4.2kg brown.
  90. 1994-08-18 Article 118263347, score 8.196805 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALAN GREENSPAN,   BOB GIORDANO,   ROSEANNE CAHN,   JOHN LIPSKY,   JOHN DURIE,   DARWIN BECK
    Organisations FIRST BOSTON,   COM MERCE DEPARTMENT,   CONGRESSIONAL,   FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD,   FED,   GOLDMAN SACHS,   SALOMON BROTHERS,   APPLE COMPUTER,   TREASURY
    Locations EUROPE,   NEW YORK,   UNITED STATES
    US interest rate move gets the thumbs-up JOHN DURIE in New York reports on attempts to slow the economy. WALL STREET has applauded the Federal Reserve Board's decision to increase short-term interest rates by 0.5 per cent. The increase to 4.75 per cent is the Fifth interest-rate hike this year since February 4 as the Fed attempts to slow the economy to prevent a rapid in crease in inflation. Fed chairman Alan Greenspan deliv ered exactly what the market wanted and the size of Tuesday's rate hike al so means that the Fed will effectively be off the agenda for the next few months. Ever since it first started raising rates the Fed has been a major cause of uncertainty in financial markets. Long-term bond investors had feared that Mr Greenspan had fallen behind in his avowed promise to make pre-emptive strikes against inflation but Tuesday's move puts him squarely ahead of the game. Stock prices jumped minutes after the Fed raised rates but they are ex pected to be weak in coming months as investors begin to realise that a slower economy means lower corpo rate profits. Long-term interest rates also fell, with the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond down from 7.5 to 7.42 per cent immediately after the report. In a statement released after its poli cy meeting the Fed said, These mea sures were taken against the backdrop of evidence of continuing strength in the economic expansion and high lev tT els of resource utilisation. It added, These actions are expected to be suffi cient, at least for a time, to meet the objective of sustained non-inflationary growth. The move comes as debate intensi fies on whether the economy was in fact already slowing before Tuesday's rate increase. While most Wall Street economists expected a rate hike they are divided over whether the economy is slowing. Goldman Sachs chief economist Bob Giordano argued that the economy was already slowing appreciably and, with no signs of rampant inflation, there was no need for a rate hike. But Salomon Brothers chief econo mist John Lipsky argued that, with strong employment growth, the econo my was running close to capacity. In the United States an unemploy ment rate of 6 per cent is regarded as being a sign that the economy is close to capacity, which means prices would start to increase. In July the unemployment rate edged up from 6 to 6.1 per cent but Fed officials have made it clear that they are worried that the economy is close to capacity. The economy grew at a 3.5 per cent annualised rate in the first half of this year and Mr Giordano argues that it will slow to below 2.5 per cent over the next six months. Growth below 3 per cent would Alan Greenspan: delivered what the market wanted calm Fed fears of imminent increases in inflation, he said. Three per cent growth is regarded as Mr Greenspan's line in the sand in terms of growth that could fuel infla tion, and anywhere above this rate of growth is considered dangerous. In the first seven months of the year inflation is running at a rate of 2.7 per cent, the same as last year, but with higher oil prices most economists think the good news is already out on inflation. In recent Congressional testimony Mr Greenspan has noted that when the official government statistics show an increase in inflation it is usually too late for us to act. Mr Greenspan has argued that the Fed should move before any signs of inflation to avoid much bigger in creases later. The US economy has created more than four million jobs in the three-and a-half year recovery but many of these jobs are classified as temporary in the retail trade or for placement services. In an attempt to save costs, compa nies such as Apple Computer have sacked staff then rehired them as con sultants with none of the normal bene fits, such as health care. This trend has also contained wage increases, with wages up just 3 per cent over the past 12 months, negating one of the key components of the con sumer price index. Housing is the only sector of the economy that appears to have peaked at an annualised rate of 1.5 million new home starts. In June new home construction fell 9.4 per cent but in July the sector bounced back with a 4.7 per cent in crease or an annualised rate of 1.4 mil lion homes. Darwin Beck, a First Boston econo mist, said that last month's increase means the slowdown in activity will be gradual and does not point to a rap id increase . Car sales in July fell but this was due more to production problems and the industry is on track to post a 9 per cent increase in sales this year with 15.5 million vehicles expected to be sold. This compares with 14.2 million ve hicles last year and will be the best year since 1988. Debate among economists has cen tred on the big increase in inventories posted in the second quarter this year combined with the sharp fall in de mand. The camp that thinks the economy is slowing argues the big increase in inventories was not planned and shows retailers and factories cannot off-load their goods. The other argument says that the build-up was planned and notes that inventories were low heading into the quarter. Roseanne Cahn, a First Boston econ omist, says the second quarter GDP figures are likely to be revised up to as much as a 4.4 per cent annual rate from the original estimates of 3.7 per cent. More recent retail figures show de mand was stronger than the Com merce Department had first predicted. Ms Cahn thinks the economy will grow by 3 per cent in the second half of the year and slow to a 2.5 per cent rate next year. With Europe showing definite signs of life, economists think it will help maintain US growth.
  91. 1994-12-03 Article 127258086, score 8.196558 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NEIL KINNOCK,   STEPHEN PRICKETT,   FRANK CRANSTON,   JOHN MORTIMER,   LEO MCKERN,   MORTIMER JOHN MORTIMER,   A. E. MINTY
    Organisations RAAF,   BLACK CATS,   CONSOLIDATED AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
    Locations FRANCE,   AUSTRALIA,   CATALINA,   OXFORD
    Misc RUMPOLE,   GERMAN,   RUM,   GREEK,   JAPANESE,   AUSTRALIAN
    More from Mortimer John Mortimer with Leo McKern: His acting exists where I always hope my writing will be. IT IS not clear if Mortimer's title is designed to suggest that murderers form another part of his life, or if this other part is to distinguish it from the First part, so ably and enter tainingly described in his 1982 autobiography Clinging to the Wreckage. Certainly readers who come to this volume expecting a sequel to that are likely to be baffled by an arrangement that is more anecdotal than sequen tial. Mortimer's glory is his versa tility. He often gives the impres sion that anyone who has been a lawyer, knocked about the world a bit, and met a selection of oddball types could, if they set their minds to it, sit down and bang out a few novels, film and TV -scripts, and create a character like Rumpole (who we are introduced to almost as an other friend: As soon as he stepped on to the page, he began to speak in his own voice, which is undoubtedly the great est favour a character can do for you. ) It is only on reflection that you realise the sheer pro fessionalism of the man: that when most people would be struggling to make their way in one very demanding job, he was turning out this amazing variety of writing at the same time as being a very successful barris ter. The result is fascinating to those, like me, who have never yet either been accused of mur der, or defended someone who lias, just because it gives us in sights into the barrister's atti tudes as well as the prisoner's. MURDERERS AND OTHER FRIENDS. Another Part of Life. By John Mortimer. Viking. 260pp. 29.95. Reviewer: STEPHEN PRICKETT. His blow-by-blow account of one particular murder trial com plete with a last-minute acquit tal because of fresh evidence has all the excitement of a Rum pole story, and, sure enough, it becomes one. Slightly more startling is the reverse story of a totally imaginary Rumpole case, opening with a guardsman wearing a woman's red dress ly ing stabbed through the heart outside a German disco, that lat er on turns out to have had its exact real-life parallel. The pro fessional relationship of barris ter with murderer is, Mortimer reflects, brief but intense while it lasts. But lest one should get the impression that friends are not normally murderers, he adds that one of his best friends at Oxford, a pacifist, a Greek scholar, a lover of Mozart, and a country doctor, one day killed his mistress and committed sui cide. Judges, one suspects, are often madder than those in the dock. My favourite among many is the one who was outraged by the story of a wife who, for 20 years, had always bathed with her husband. What so upset his lordship was not the shared bath, which he took as normal, but that she made him sit at the tap end, which he obviously found both cruel and deeply in decent. Slightly less -entrancing are whole chapters so dripping with famous names of actors, writers, politicians or media personali ties that one thinks more of a tabloid gossip column than one man's autobiography. Why someone with as rich an imagin ation and psychological insight as Mortimer should feel it neces sary to tell not-very-exciting stories about his friendships with Olivier, Gielgud, or Neil Kinnock, and illustrate them with photos of the this is me with Larry in the South of France variety, is not clear. One half-suspects that his pub lisher has persuaded him to put together a lot of half-digested material on his life, and then to pad it with references to the fa mous, on the cynical grounds that anything Mortimer writes will sell. The pity is, it probably will but those who like vin tage Mortimer will be disap pointed by this raw and uneven brew. If the result is occasionally hi larious, it is sometimes just con fusing. This feeling of not quite knowing what is going on, and when, and with whom is com pounded both by his habit of re peating some stories from the earlier volume and, by what one can only assume is either an ex treme conservatism or an equal ly extreme carelessness, his marrying two wives with the same name. Is there a Rumpole story with that plot, or have I missed it? Remarkable flying machine for its time THE Consolidated Aircraft Corporation's PBY twin-en gined Catalina flying boat was a remarkable machine for its time, and for Australia a major bonus when very little else was going for us. With its long range and its ruggedness the Catalina was able to maintain accurate surveillance of Japanese moves in our northern area. No mere observers, however, the RAAF's two squadrons of Catalinas painted black be cause they operated largely by night also bombed Japanese shipping and bases. They also BLACK CATS. Compiled by A. E. Minty. RAAF Museum. 250pp. Si5. Reviewer: FRANK CRANSTON. later specialised in sowing mines in harbours or shipping channels which not only sank enemy ships but forced labori ous sweeping procedures and se riously disrupted the enemy's operational momentum. Mr Minty has relied heavily here on reports by wartime col leagues and records as well as his own logs and recollections. The story changes pace as differ ent perspectives come into play, but never loses its interest. The RAAF Museum has done well with this effort to ensure the memory of a relatively small part of a national effort which was undertaken in strict secrecy and was later to fall victim to the security which surrounded it by evading most of the chron iclers. Black Cats is a worthwhile ad dition to any library which has an interest in Australian history and in military aviation history in particular.
  92. 1994-09-02 Article 118135129, score 8.187067 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People GORDON WILSON,   IAN PAISLEY,   JONATHAN BALL,   JAMES MOLYNEAUX,   TIM PARRY,   MARTIN MCGUINNESS,   PAUL MORLEY,   JOHN MAJOR,   GERRY ADAMS
    Organisations WEBLEY,   IRA,   DEMOCRATIC UNIONIST PARTY,   PROTESTANT,   IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY,   ULSTER UNIONISTS,   SINN FEIN
    Locations WEST BELFAST,   WARRINGTON,   LONDON,   FALLS ROAD,   CHESHIRE,   NORTHERN IRELAND,   BRITAIN,   IRISH SEA,   STAPLES CORNER,   ENNISKILLEN,   BELFAST,   IRISH REPUBLIC,   IRELAND,   BERLIN WALL,   DUBLIN
    Misc ULSTER,   CATHOLICS,   REMEMBRANCE,   BISHOPS,   UNIONIST,   INDEPENDENT GUERRILLAS,   ARMALITE,   IRISH,   CATHOLIC,   UNIONISTS,   WORLD WAR II,   BALTIC EX,   BRITISH
    Celebration aplenty, but no-one claiming victory HOPES HIGH: A republican woman waves an Irish tricolour in the Falls Road, Belfast; Gerry Adams addresses IRA supporters in West Belfast; Paul Morley, 6, with a British soldier in West Belfast. Time needed to peel layers of suspicion BELFAST, Thursday: People did not dance in the streets. They said, I'll believe it when I see it. They said, I wonder what the murdering bastards will get out of it. They said, It's a con. Most of these things they said to themselves, 6r in safe company. To react in a particular way was a political act, which could be dangerous.: Over the years the optimists in Belfast have dwindled to a tiny band, much patronised by everyone else. For most, the carapace of cyni cism is so thick that they have not yet admitted, even to themselves, the significance of the IRA's announcement that it was laying down its arms. Because of all the layers of suspicion, and be cause this is a zero-sum conflict, the immediate reactions were first to establish that it really is over, and second to work out who won. Unionists and the British Government want it carved in tablets of stone that the stoppage real ly is permanent. The Government in Dublin, which is a society dedicated to the culture of celebration, is satisfied already. The IRA will pre sumably in time satisfy London that it means what it says, but Unionists will not be convinced. They will say that since the IRA guns and Sem tex are still out there somewhere, the republi cans must still be regarded as an armed move ment and excluded from politics. Yesterday's business was primarily between the IRA and the British Government, and it is here that the business of permanency is to be sorted out. The Unionist community is poised, uncertain whether to accept the words of James Molyneaux, leader of the Ulster Unionists, or to believe the Reverend Ian Paisley's prophecies of treachery. Mr Paisley, the leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, said, I don't see in the document any renunciation of violence, I hear the salute to murderers. I see no suggestion whatsoever of a permanent cessation of violence. In notably calmer tones, Mr Molyneaux urged British Prime Minister John Major not to accept the statement yet because it did not go far enough. Mr Major had no option but to reject the IRA statement until it agreed the halt was permanent. Mr Major's own view was that we need to be clear that this is indeed intended to be a perma nent renunciation of violence that is to say, foi good . The Unionists' final verdict will help decide whether the loyalist paramilitaries again attack Catholic pubs, or whether they decide to give the peace a chance and try to get their own boys home from the prisons. Many lives could depend on this decision. In the meantime, the point about permanency will either be quickly settled or develop into the kind of stubborn stalemate which has characterised so much of the peace process. Many lives could depend on that, too. Yet up in west Belfast, among the hundreds who turned out at a hastily arranged rally to hear Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness, no one was in any doubt: it was over. The IRA campaign, the major part of the violence through the years, has run its course. Mr Adams praised the IRA to the skies and praised the people of west Belfast, who remained undefeated despite all Britain had thrown at them. But he did not claim victory; he did not tell them they had won. Continued on Page 8 Editorial, Pry or Page 10 Celebration aplenty, but no-one brave enough to claim victory Continued from Page 1 He said the core issues had not been resolved. This means the IRA cam paign had been stopped without achieving many of its aims including, crucially, extracting a British declara tion of intent to withdraw. Mr Adams and Mr McGuinness will now argue for this at the conference table, rather than seeking to bring it about through force. The crowd ap plauded, but it svas all slightly forced. The Sinn Fein woman who chaired the rally, who is noted for her generally unsmiling countenance, wore a fixed smile for much of the time. One thing we all know is that the struggle is not over, she told them. We are into a new and important phase of this struggle. They dutifully applauded, but' it was clearly putting a brave face on things. Mr Paisley may think the republi cans have won, but the people who stood in the street did not. These are proud people. One of them years ago coined the phrase: God made the Catholics and the Armalite made them equal. The new proposition being put to them by Mr Adams is that his pres ence in politics will fulfil the function of that Armalite. Yesterday they showed much trust in him, but there is less than full commitment to his argu ment. Even if the import of the day had been more clear-cut, it would not have been a time for the sort of jubilation which attended, for example, the fall of the Berlin Wall. There has been too much loss, too many funerals, too many widows and orphans for that type of celebration. Besides, too many issues remain unresolved, too many di visions remain, too many things could yet go wrong. The south of Ireland are world champions at parties and revelry: northern culture has always been grim mer, and a quarter of a century of di vision and death has done nothing to improve that. A momentous point, however, has been passed in this pain ful process: the IRA has stopped and says it does not intend to start again. Realists will dwell on all the things that can still go wrong, but perhaps yesterday was the day when it became safe to join the optimists and to accept that Ulster is moving slowly and awk wardly, but unmistakeably, towards peace. The Independent Guerrillas' arsenals are still a concern BELFAST: The IRA's open-ended cease-fire will probably not destroy the guerrillas' arsenal of automatic weap ons and home-made barrack buster mortar bombs it is more likely just to bury them. Security sources say tonnes of arms and munitions are likely to be moth balled in underground rural dumps ex cept for some which will be kept for emergencies such as a feared rash of attacks by Protestant extremists. The IRA's arsenal ranges from the 1950s British Webley service revolvers to the .50 calibre Barrett sniping rifle, probably (he most formidable weapon it holds. They are now likely, to be greased, wrapped in oiled cloth and buried in a. series of dumps along, across and over, the border with the Irish Republic, the sources said. It is widely thought the IRA has up to '300 tonnes of weapons and muni tions in dumps that include portable cabins sunk1 into rivers or. bogs. Their location is known only to top IRA men. Last year, when the opening across the Northern Ireland-Ireland border was opened, police found an arms haul buried in a petrol drum in the river bank. -neuter Offer the 'start of the end' LONDON, Thursday: A Northern Ireland draper who touched the hearts of millions around the world when he forgave the Irish Republican Army for killing his daughter, hailed the IRA cease-fire on Wednesday as the start of the end . Gordon Wilson, from the Northern Ireland border town of Enniskillen. offered grief-stricken words of for giveness for IRA bombers who killed his daughter during a Remembrance Day commemoration ceremony in the town in 1987. He received 10.000 letters of sup port after relating how he clutched the hand of his daughter Marie as her life ebbed away under the shat tered remnants of Enniskillen's com munity centre on November 11 that year. The blast killed 11 people. Asked to react to the IRA's an nouncement of an end to its 25-year guerrilla campaign against Britain. Wilson said, I'd like to think this is a breakthrough. 1 think it's the start of the end. It allows people to sit round a table and work something out which could not have been done if folk were at the table with a gun in their hand and talking down the barrel of it. Business as usual for police LONDON: It was business as usual today for police investigat ing a string of unsolved IRA atrocities. While politicians on both sides of the Irish Sea digest the IRA's cease-fire statement, the legacy of 25 years of bloody conflict lives on in police files which remain open. In Warrington, where two boys died in a bomb attack on a shop ping centre on March 20 last year, determination is as great as ever to catch the killers. Three-year-old Jonathan Ball died instantly. Tim Parry, 12. died some days later. A spokesman for Cheshire po lice said, Investigations into the murder of Jonathan Ball and Tim Parry continue. These cases will never close. We are still appealing to the pub lic for any information which could bring their killers to book. Other major IRA crimes for which no-one has been convicted include: April 24. 1993 - Bishops gate bombing. City of London. One man died and up to 1 bil lion (SA2.07 billion) in damage was caused to the commercial heart of the capital when a huge lorry bomb exploded. April 10. 1992 - Baltic Ex change bombing. City of London. Three people died and 91 were hurt when a 1000-pound bomb exploded the biggest on the mainland since the World War II. Hours later, another bomb ex ploded at Staples Corner, on the MI motorway.
  93. 1994-08-29 Article 118265834, score 8.139132 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People AMY WEEKES,   DANIEL CONLON,   JOHN PAINTER,   W. L. HOFFMANN,   ANTHONY HEIN,   COLLEEN RAE-GERRARD,   JACKIE LOVE,   MAREE JOHNSON,   LARRY SITSKY,   PETER COUSENS,   ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER,   MARY TATCLI ELL,   PETER SCULTHORPE,   SARAH DEPASQUALE,   MICHAEL WHITTAKER,   PETER CONSTANT,   ANDREW DARK,   DON BANKS,   RONALD WOODCOCK,   MICHELLE HIGGS,   ANNE GILBY,   VAUGHAN WIL,   JEREMY TATCHELL,   ROB GUEST,   HANS GUENTCR MOMMER,   MAL COLM FOX
    Organisations ST PAUL'S CHURCH,   LIEDER SOCIETY,   SCHOOL OF MUSIC CHAMBER ORCHESTRA,   SCHOOL OF ARTS CAFE,   ACT CANCER SOCIETY,   AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER CHOIR,   RAAF CENTRAL BANDS,   RMC
    Locations PARIS OPERA,   FURLONG ROAD,   MELBOURNE,   CANBERRA,   SYDNEY,   LLEWELLYN HALL,   ADELAIDE,   LLEWELLYLN MALL,   QUEANBEYAN,   MADEW,   THEATRE ROYAL,   MANUKA
    Misc DAFFODIL,   FRENCH,   GERMAN,   ENGLISH,   TEA ROSE DUO,   CONCERT,   AUSTRALIAN
    The Phantom adapts well to Sydney By W. L. HOFFMANN WHILE in Sydney re cently I took the op portunity to see that phenomenon of Australian musi cal theatre, Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera, in its new location at the Theatre Royal, where it had just concluded its first 12 months. It was nearly four years ago that I reviewed the opening per formance of the Australian pro duction at the Princess Theatre in Melbourne, a venue that pro vided an atmosphere that admi rably suggested the opulence of the Paris Opera, the setting of the show. I was interested to sec how it had been adapted to the smaller and rather bland sur rounds of Sydney's Theatre Roy al, and to hear a different cast of principals. There has been a successful interior remodelling, which does give something of the feeling of a 19th century opera house, and the smaller venue provides a more intimate ambience for the audience, which, in some signifi cant areas, adds to the dramatic impact. One big difference is in the fall of the chandelier from the roof in the spectacular end ing to the first act. In the Prin cess it travelled fairly sedately to crash on the stage, but now it comes down very fast over the audience to stunning effect. The three current principals all have had operatic experience and the performance is very strongly sung, with Rob Guest as the Phantom giving a sombre per formance, which yet touches a sympathetic chord. Excellently matching him, both vocally and dramatically, is Maree Johnson as Christine, singing with a clear and warm tonal quality in a characterisation that is suitably strong yet beguiling. And Peter Cousens as Raoul brings his fine voice to the role of Christine's The Tea Rose Duo, Bernard and Sarah Depasquale, who will appear at the School of Arts Cafe in Queanbeyan on September 1, 2 and 3. rescuer, their love duet, All I ask of you, one of the musical high lights of the show. This modern, popular opera is still drawing packed houses, and looks set to establish a new Aus tralian long-run record for musi cal theatre. Those who have not yet seen this remarkable show should take the advantage of its proximity in Sydney, and anyone who has already enjoyed it will find, as I did, that this present Sydney production is just as memorable and enjoyable. In Canberra this week Thurs day night offers a choice of three very different music per formances. At the School of Mu sic at 8.15pm Australian violinist Ronald Woodcock will give a re cital in the Australian Compos ers Series. With pianist Colleen Rae-Gerrard he will play the So nata for violin and piano by Don Banks, Six Miniatures by Mal colm Fox, and' four pieces by Larry Sitsky, titled Tetragram maton, together with shorter works by Peter Sculthorpe and Michael Whittaker clock that night in St Paul's Church, Manuka, the Australian Chamber Choir, under the direction of Hans Guentcr Mommer, will perform Dvorak's Mass in D major, together with choral pieces by Vaughan Wil liams and Messiaen, and solo items provided by organist Bar bara McRac and Anthony Hein richs (trumpet). The soloists for this program will be Amy Weekes (soprano), Mary Tatcli ell (contralto), Andrew Dark (tenor) and Jeremy Tatchell (baritone). Over in Queanbeyan, at the School of Arts Cafe, Thursday night brings the first of three performances by the Tea Rose Duo from Adelaide. Bernard and Sarah Depasquale are a piano and violin duo who are establish- ing a wide reputation in a repertoire of high-quality salon music, music that ranges from the. baroque to popular classics, and includes favourites from musical theatre. This dinner-show promises a bottomless cup of listening pleasure . On Friday night, in Llewellyln Mall at 8.15, the School of Music Chamber Orchestra, conducted by John Painter, will play a nicely varied program of string works . Bach and Bartok, as well as the Viola Concerto in A minor by Telemann and Sarasate's Zigeunerweisen in which the soloists will be Daniel Conlon (viola) and Michelle Higgs (violin). Saturday night brings a Daffodil Day Concert in Llewellyn Hall at 8 o'clock, sponsored by the ACT Cancer Society, and featuring Jackie Love as guest artist with the combined RMC and RAAF Central Bands, together with a local vocal ensemble, Rhythm Syndicate. The ACT Lieder Society' offers something a little different on Sunday afternoon when, at 2.30 at Madew's Winery, Furlong Road, Queanbeyan, the pre- sentation Baroque 'n Bottles brings a program of baroque cantatas, guitar solos, and English, French and German madrigals, leavened with wine tasting. Phone inquiries . to 281 2466. And in the Girls' Grammar School Chapel, Deakin, also at 2.30pm on Sunday, a former Canberra oboist, Anne Gilby, with guitarist Peter Constant will perform a program of works by Coste, Telemann, Villa-Lobos, Ravel and Ibert.
  94. 1994-07-11 Article 118190208, score 8.038765 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALAIN BOUBLIL,   BELA BARTOK,   MARGARET SUTHERLAND,   DOROTHY HEWETT,   VICTOR HUGO,   LEN VOR,   JOHN THOMSON,   SWEENEY TODD,   IAN MCLEAN,   PETER WISEMAN,   STEPHEN PIKE,   FLO EWART,   GENE VIEVE LANG,   MOYA HENDERSON,   ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER,   LES MISERABLES,   SARAH SHALDERS,   MARK NORTON,   W.L. HOFFMANN,   HELEN NOONAN,   CAMERON MACKINTOSH,   BELINDA JEZEK,   JEAN VILJEAN,   HELEN MOUNTFORD,   HELEN IRELAND,   COLIN FISCHER,   JUDITH WRIGHT,   COLIN ANDERSON,   PEGGY GLANVILLE-HICKS,   BRENTON BROADSTOCK,   CAROLYN MONGER,   CLAUDE-MICHEL SCHONBERG,   MUSICA VIVA,   TONY FALL,   LINDA STUCKEY,   OLIVER MILLER,   JOHN SHAW NEIL,   LYN MOSELEY,   ROY WEISSENSTEINER,   LORRAINE FRANCIS,   KEVIN HOOP
    Organisations CANBERRA PHILHARMONIC,   SCHOOL OF MUSIC IMOGEN PARKER,   LES MISERABLES,   TIVOLI CONCERT HALL
    Locations FANTINE,   FRANCE,   LONDON,   BARRIOS,   AMSTERDAM,   CANBERRA,   TOKYO,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   TEL AVIV,   LLEWELLYN HALL,   ITALY,   BRITAIN,   LES MISERABLES,   BROADWAY,   BUDAPEST,   FAIRFAX THEATRE,   EPINONE,   GERMA,   ALBERT HALL,   THEATRE ROYAL
    Misc AUSTRALIAN YOUTH ORCHESTRA,   FRENCHMEN,   EUROPEAN,   ALL-CANBERRA,   PHILHARMONIC,   AUSTRALIAN
    Les Mis: records before it begins By W.L. HOFFMANN NEXT SATURDAY night brings a landmark in music-theatre in Canberra with the open ing performance of Canberra Philharmonic's production of Le.s Miserables. It will be the first presentation here of this dra matic and highly successful musical, which is still, nine years after it was first seen in London, being played in many locations around the world. And such is its audience appeal that this Philharmonic production, which will run through to the end of the month at the Canberra Theatre, is already complete ly sold out. Thus it has already created two records for Can berra: it is the first Philharmonic production to sell out 10 days before its opening, and the audience of more than 15,000 people who will see it is a record attendance for any single show at the Canberra The atre. Les Miserables was written by two Frenchmen, Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg, and opened at the Barbican Theatre, London, on Sep tember 30, 1985. It received a lukewarm critical re ception but, once again, as with The Phantom of (he Opera a few years later, the critics were wrong, and audiences flocked to see it. In 1987 it opened on Broadway, where it is still running, and productions quickly followed in Tokyo, Tel Aviv and Budapest. It has now been seen by audiences totalling -30 mil lion around the world. The Australian professional production opened at the Theatre Royal, Sydney, in November 1987, and 'ran for four years around the country. I was at that opening night and still recall the dramatic impact the show made on that occasion. The writer and composer were both present for that Australian pre miere, and the producer, Cameron Mackintosh, de clared it the finest performance of the show to that date. So this Canberra production has something to live up to. It is being directed by Colin Anderson, but he is the only visitor associated with it. The designs are by John Thomson, the musical director is Ian McLean, and the chorus director Colin Fischer. The all-Canberra cast is headed by Stephen Pike as Jean Viljean and Philip Pain as Javert, with Lyn Moseley (Fantine) and Roy Weissensteiner (Marius). Tony Fall and Lorraine Francis play the evil Thenadiers, and three voice students from the School of Music Imogen Parker, Sarah Shalders and Kevin Hoop er take the roles of Epinone, Cosette and Enjol ras. They will be supported by an ensemble of 36 singers. Les Miserables, like the best of Bernstein and Takacs String Quartet: this outstanding ensemble will perform in Llewellyn Hall on Saturday night. Sondheim, and Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phan tom of the Opera, pushes the barriers of music-the atre forward. It is a contemporary opera, being completely through-sung , and has been aptly de scribed as a great blazing pageant of life and death at the barricades of political and social revolution in Victor Hugo's 19th century France . Already Can berra has mounted very fine local productions of West Side Story and Sweeney Todd, and although Les Miserables is the most demanding and ambitious show that Canberra Philharmonic has yet attempted it has every promise of being a memorable music theatre experience. Musica Viva's next concert, in Llewellyn Hall on Saturday night, brings back an outstanding Hungari an ensemble, the Takacs String Quartet, making its third Australian tour. Those who heard this quartet on its previous Canberra appearances will need no reminding of the freshness,' vitality and intensity of its playing. The program on Saturday night will open with Haydn's Quartet in F major, Op.74, No3, and will conclude with Smetana's autobiographical Quartet in E minor, which the composer sub-titled From my Life. Between these two works the Takacs will play the Second String Quartet by their countryman Bela Bartok. There is a School of Music recital on Sunday af ternoon at 4 o'clock, when guitarist Mark Norton, a graduate of the school, will play a program of works by Bach, Barrios, Ginastera and Tarrega. The Australian Youth Orchestra opened its cur rent European tour with a concert in Amsterdam's famed Concertgebouw last Friday night, commenc ing the program with the Festive Overture by Aus tralian composer Brenton Broadstock. Tonight they play in the Tivoli Concert Hall, Co penhagen, and give further performances in Germa ny and Italy before travelling to Britain for a per formance at a promenade concert in the Royal' Albert Hall, London. Among the members of the orchestra are seven young Canberra musicians: Belinda Jezek (violin), Helen Ireland (viola), Oliver Miller (cello), Gene vieve Lang (harp), Peter Wiseman (trumpet), and flautists Carolyn Monger and Linda Stuckey. Women's songs well presented SONGS by Australian women composers were featured in an attractive presentation, Woman's Song, which was devised by sopra no Helen Noonan and performed by her in the Fairfax Theatre, Na tional Gallery of Australia, on Saturday evening. It was a program that empha sised the important contribution that.women composers have made to creative music in this country, although this contribution has re ceived greater recognition, particu larly in recent years, than the pre sentation suggested. Margaret Sutherland certainly was widely acclaimed for the qual ity of her music, and her song-cy cle To a Child is a charming set ting of lyrics by John Shaw Neil son. It was given a delightful per formance, with the singer receiving expressive support from Len Vor ster at the piano. They also pro vided a highly characteristic per formance of another Sutherland work, World and the Child, to lyr ics by Australian poet Judith Wright. Another Australian woman poet featured in the presentation with the inclusion of eight songs from composer Moya Henderson's song cycle Wild Card, for which the lyrics are by Dorothy Hewett. These short character-pieces are light and humorous, and Helen Noonan sang them with the touch of impishness that nicely under lined their quizzical nature. Cellist Helen Mountford joined singer and pianist for this work. Three short songs by Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Flo Ewart and May Brahe brought a lighter mood before the presentation con cluded with Moya Henderson's amusingly wayward arrangement of Waltzing Matilda. It was a very entertaining and attractively presented program, with the projection of suitable slides of paintings from the Aus tralian collection actively comple menting the music . HOFFMANN
  95. 1994-01-31 Article 126925900, score 8.014862 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People WINSTON GALEA,   DULCIE HOLLAND,   BARTON CUMMINGS,   SI CROSBIE,   JOHN STUART,   STARR BAND,   RINGO STARR,   JIM BONNEFOND,   TODD RUNDGREN,   MIRIAM HYDE,   NICOLE IEEDHAM,   ROB WORKMAN,   TESSA BIRNIE,   TIMOTHY B. SCHMIDT,   GREG MCLAIN,   DAVID CRES TANI,   DAVE EDMUNDS,   NILS LOFGREN,   GEOFF ACHISON,   TODD RURIDGREN,   JELLYBEAN BENI TEZ,   BILL BROONZY
    Organisations BLUES CLUB LIVE,   W.L HOFFMANN,   G MEN, BLUES CLUB RECORDS,   BMG,   O'JAYS,   EAGLES,   BLUES CLUB,   BLUES CLUB RECORDS,   SOUTHERN CROSS RECORDS
    Locations LONDON,   MELBOURNE,   BARRY HILLS,   CSHARP,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   PRAHAN,   VICTORIA,   BROWNHILL CREEK,   MONTREUX,   HAWKSBURN
    Misc WENTWORTH,   BANG THE DRUM ALL,   AMERICAN-STYLE,   HIS ALL STARR BAND,   RHAPSODY NO,   PIA NO SONATA-IN,   WORLD WAR,   DUTCH,   YOU ARE SO BEAUTIFUL,   JAPANESE,   AUSTRALIAN,   PUERTO RICAN
    HOME ENTERTAINMENT A lesson in rock history COMPACT DISC Ringo Starr and His AH Starr Band. Live from Montreux (Festi val) S A SINGER, Ringo Starr It is funny, really, that the last song on this disc is Ringo belting out With A Little Help From My Friends with its opening lines What would you do if I sang but of tune? . Obviously nothing as the crowd in Montreux cheer on the former teen idoK Ringo Starr has got together with his famous friends for this perform ance and the list reads like a session muso's dream: Nils Lofgren, Todd Ruridgren, Barton Cummings and Dave Edmunds, just some of the names that appear. It is not a bad disc particularly the songs where Ringo stays on the drums and it has some wonder ful highlights such as Timothy B. Schmidt doing the Eagles' / Can't Tell You Why and Todd Rundgren exciting the crowd with the vibrant Bang The Drum All Day. Beatles' songs include Yellow Sub marine, With a Little Help From My Friends and Boys. At the very least, it is a lesson in rock'n'roll history. (6.5) Soundtrack. Carlito's Way (Epic) THIS film, starring A1 Pacino as a Puerto Rican drug dealer trying to go straight, opens nationally on February 24 and if the soundtrack is any indication, it will be a big hit. A perfect combination of Latin tunes and re-mixes of'70s hits such as Rock the Boat and You Are So Beautiful. Music supervisor Jellybean Beni tez has drawn together a group of talented artists including Rozalla, LaBelle, Santana and the O'Jays to make up this cleverly crafted sound track. Unlike others in this genre, it is not necessary to see the film in order to appreciate the disc a big bonus for music lovers. (8) Shai. Right Back At Cha (BMG) THE harmonies of the four soul ful blokes from Shai are almost perfect too perfect perhaps. They are the kind of rock artists you could take home to meet moth makes.a great drummer. go otarr and His All Starr Band: some very famous friends get together for a Montreux concert. er land there are not many of them around). This album includes a good mix of live, re-mixed and original studio versions of 10 harmless and melodi ous songs. A highlight is the live version of one of the best love songs of last year, If I Ever Fall In Love. Love songs are not exactly this reviewer's cup of tea but this one manages to evoke deep-hidden emo tions. If middle of the road, tuneful love songs are your thing, you will love this record. (7) NICOLE IEEDHAM CLASSICAL Miriam Hyde: Brownhill Creek in Spring & other piano works. Miriam Hyde (piano) ... Southern Cross Records SCCD 1027. THE TWO discs reviewed today are volumes 1 and 2 in a series, Composing Women Australia, which represents a unique commit ment by an Australian record label to feature the music of Australia's women composers as an ongoing project. Miriam Hyde was born in Ade laide in 1913 and since she returned to this country in 1936 after study in London she has spent most of her working life in Sydney. While she has written a substan tial body of works, it is for her piano compositions that she is best known, and this disc offers a fine selection of these works. There is one major work, the Pia no Sonata-in G minor, which was written during the Second World War, and two reasonably large-scale pieces, a Rhapsody No 1 in F sharp minor and the Concert Study No 3 in Csharp minor. The remainder of the disc is taken up with shorter mood pieces, such as the impressionistic Magpies at Sun rise and the atmospheric Brownhill Creek In Spring which provides the title for the disc. Miriam Hyde was always a very fine pianist, and the playing here by the 80-year-old, composer is quite remarkable in its technical control and sparkling assurance; while the recording, made in Sydney last year, is excellent in its clear and realisticly balanced piano sound. This is a delightful disc of very attractive Australian piano music which displays a strong musical per sonality. Dulcie Holland: A Scattering of Leaves & other piano works. Played by the composer and Tessa Birnie ... Southern Cross Records SCCD 1028. DULCIE Holland, born in Syd ney within 10 days of Miriam Hyde, has been a major influence in the development of Australian cre ative music, and like her contempo rary remains active in her 80th year, both as a composer and as a per former. Her compositions range widely, from orchestral and chamber music to smaller works and a considerable amount of film music. Again on this disc there is one substantial composition, her Sonata for Piano (1952), together with a selection of smaller pieces. Dulcie Holland plays most of them herself, including A Scattering Of Leaves which is a collection of five short musical pictures written in 1986. The other works have been select ed to cover her creative life from the Nocturne of 1947 to Retrospect writ ten in 1991. These are again delightful and at tractive works, very well played, while the Sonata is excellently per formed by another notable Austra lian woman pianist, Tessa Birnie. W.L HOFFMANN JAZZ Red Dirt Blues, G Men, Blues Club Records BCR104CD. Dutch Tildeh and the Blues Club Live, Blues Club Records, BCR10SCD. ANOTHER Australian company comes to notice with these two albums of a music which has a strong generic following in this country. The G Men would seem to be based in or near Sydney. Their management company has a Wentworth Falls address, al though Blues Club is out of Mel bourne. They comprise John Stuart on lead vocals, slide guitar and congas; Greg McLain, drums, vocals and timbales; Si Crosbie, harp, vocals, guiro and poiciana; and David Cres tani, bass vocals and surdo; with Jim Bonnefond also listed on vocals and Rob Workman on Japanese Hammond. All of which suggests a full and rounded sound, a suggestion which is met in 11 tracks of originals com posed by members in various col laborations. They have an easy style in terms of presentation, although their mu sic offers most elements of the blues: hard-edged reality, raunchiness, some very human emotions and all with a direct realism. Dutch Tilders, on vocals and gui tar, is an institution in Australian blues: or should that be in blues as played in Australia? Whatever, there is no doubting the attachment and involvement in the audience during this session at the Station Tavern and Brewery in Prahan in January, 1993. With Tildcrs are GeofF Achison on guitar, Winston Galea on drums and Barry Hills on bass. The program includes several Tilders songs, leavened by others by such as Big Bill Broonzy and Lead better. It also includes House of the Ris ing Sun, a traditional piece which has known many lives in many idi oms. The music should satisfy the most avid Tilders and blues followers, de livered as it is in his gravel-gutted, highly individual style. My only concern is that he has developed an American-style patter which, while out of the home of the blues, removes him a place or two from his continental and Australian base. But it is years since I heard him in person so travel and other influ ences may have crept up on him. In any case, the music is the es sence of the contract, and that is honestly delivered in both these al bums. Blues Club Records' address is PO Box 18, Hawksburn, Victoria 3142, or on (03).826 9002, the same number as for the delightfully titled Clef Hanger Promotions.
  96. 1994-11-24 Article 130539750, score 7.9766116 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People EDWARD MOOR,   WAYNE GRADY,   GREG NORMAN,   PETER SENIOR,   MARK CALCAVECCHIA,   BRAD FAXON'WAS,   BRETT OGLE,   TIM FINCHEM,   CRAIG PARRY,   SCOT ANDREW COLTART,   ROB ERT ALLENBY,   MIKE SPRINGER,   JOHN MONTGOMERY JNR,   NORMAN VON NIDA,   IAN BAKER-FINCH
    Organisations PGA TOUR,   US PGA,   PGA
    Locations SCOTLAND,   METROPOLITAN,   METRO,   CANADA,   SPAIN,   PONTE VEDRA,   FLORIDA,   UNITED STATES,   TAMPA,   ROYAL SYDNEY,   JAPAN
    Misc PGA TOUR,   SHARK SHOOTOUT,   AMERICANS,   B.C. OPEN,   NEW'ENGLAND CLASSIC,   AUSTRALIANS,   AUS TRALIAN MASTERS,   AUSTRALIAN OPEN,   EUROPEAN,   OPEN,   AMERICAN,   DEFENDING OPEN,   BRITISH,   AUSTRALIAN
    Norman hits form in time for Open SYDNEY: World No 2 Greg Norman yesterday warned he had blanked out a week of turmoil and was hitting peak form for the' 850,000 Australian Open starting here today. I am ready to play. I was swinging the club as well as I have all year, said a confident Norman. Defending Open champion Brad Faxon'was forced to shell out 200 to Norman for a remarkable feat in their practice round to gether at Royal Sydney yesterday. And the American admitted he was impressed to see the Shark so relaxed after his week of high drama, during which he acted as spokesman for the controversial new world tour. I think he is 100 per cent more relaxed here, said Faxon, who won at Norman's Shark Shootout tournament,in Califor nia last week. ''He is definitely swinging a lot better. I think the swing is better because the mind is better. He is the guy to beat here. This thing [the new tour] has def initely hurt, his golf in the last two or three weeks. Pundits were yesterday tipping the Open on the shortish, 6245m, course to develop into a putting contest and if so, Faxon would be a smart bet. But Norman, who later spent an hour taking tips from former great Norman Von Nida on the practice green, showed some touch of his own with a massive 150 foot putt to pocket Faxon's cash on the double green for the 10th and 12th holes. The Open, touted in the past as the . world's fifth major, has taken some flak for failing to produce an all star international cast. : However, Wayne Grady said fellow Australians would have to be wary of Americans Faxon, Mike Springer,' who was 13th on the US tour's 1994 money list, and former British Open-champion Mark Calcavecchia, who won the Open at 19-under on the same course in 1988. People here might not know much about Mike Springer but he won twice on the US tour this year, he a very strong hitter and a good putter, Grady said. Faxon, who putted brilliantly to win the Open at Metropolitan last year, felt right at home at Royal Sydney,, I like the course, the greens are a lot like like those at Metro politan, he said. But hitting onto the greens will be a big key because many of them are elevated and the lies around them are tight. Faxon was adamant the Open retained international signifi cance and criticised his stay-at-hojne countrymen for not playing such events. Most American players don't like to travel but they are hurt ing themselves, when you see what great names have come here and won this event in the past. To me it was a big break through to win internationally. The European challenge is headed by young Scot Andrew Coltart who last week added the Australian PGA title to his Scot tish PGA crown. With form question marks over many of the usual leading Austra lian contenders, a confident Rob ert Allenby and. Craig Parry loomed as a big hopes. Norman, who has not won in this country since the 1990 Aus tralian Masters, has said the pressure of attending to his many business interests here, may be the'reason for his lack of success. Grady, the course record holder with a seven-under 65 in 1988, missed last week's Australian PGA. with an arm injury. Brett Ogle has hardly touched a club for four weeks and doesn't' know what he'll produce. Ian Baker-Finch has had a well-documented horror year and would be happy just to play with some confidence again. . And even perennial contender Peter Senior lacks the form of previous years because of a stop start season in Japan. World tour likely to spark golf war PONTE VEDRA, Florida, Wed nesday: World tour organisers and PGA Tour officials met here for talks yesterday but found lit tle room for compromise in a bat tle which threatens to start a global war of golf. John Montgomery Jnr, execut ive director of the proposed world tour, said his group was willing to cut its 1995 debut season from eight events to six. Montgomery also suggested switching some struggling PGA events to his new circuit. . But there was no doubt the US25 million ( A32.85 million) world series was going forward, with or without the PGA's bless ing. PGA legal counsel and .task force chairman Edward Moor house said: Certainly they [world tour organisers] would like to work with us and not have confrontation, But they are committed to it at this point. Montgomery pitched a 1995 schedule with two United States tournaments instead of the ori ginal four, keeping planned events in Japan, Scotland, Spain and Canada. Each event would match 40 of the world's top players with a US600,000 ( A788,300) top prize. The world circuit would then grow to eight events for the 1996 season. Two planned world tourna ments, would be after the PGA season with no schedule conflicts. But four others would fall be tween May and mid-August, a span when three of golfs four major crowns are decided. I.don't really want to say we are competing, Montgomery said. That is why we have been focusing on an eight-event, and now a six-event, series. We want to allow the best to play the best but also allow them to play their home circuits. That would be impossible ac cording to PGA commissioner Tim Finchem, who was not at the meetings. Finchem has said PGA players would not be allowed to play the world circuit. Players would be tested between PGA loy alty and world money. Montgomery suggested a plan to transfer some struggling US PGA events to world tour juris diction. He. named the B.C. Open and New'England Classic as US PGA events seeking a sponsor that could become the world tour's US stops and avert some scheduling woes. The PGA's next move will come next week, after Finchem has been briefed on the talks. Finchem will make a recommend ation to the PGA Tour policy board at its regular meeting in Tampa. Montgomery said only non-US golfers had committed to the world circuit. Many international ' golfers have been critical of PGA rules requiring PGA players to enter 15 sanctioned events each year. - afp ;
  97. 1994-09-11 Article 118137076, score 7.928722 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People O. J. SIMPSON,   JOHN PAUL II,   BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD,   JOE MCGINNIS,   JACKIE COLLINS,   ROGER STRAUSS,   RICHARD NIXON,   JIMMY CARTER,   PETER LENNON,   SYDNEY SHELDON,   MICHAEL CRICHTON,   MORT JANKLOW,   JUDITH KRANTZ,   LYNN NESBIT,   JOHN II,   DOLLY PARTON,   WILLIAM MORROW,   DIANE ACKERMAN,   WILLIAM SAFIRE,   TED KENNEDY
    Organisations BLEAK HOUSE,   INTERNATIONAL CREATIVE MANGEMENT,   COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
    Locations FRANCE,   AMERICA,   CANBERRA,   ORLEANS,   NEW YORK,   HOLLYWOOD-BY-THEHUDSON,   UNITED STATES
    Misc CATHOLICS,   POLISH,   HIMALAYAN,   COMMANDMENTS,   VICTORIAN,   ITALIAN,   TIBETAN,   AMERICAN CATHOLICS,   GUARDIAN,   AMERICAN,   JAPANESE
    20 THE CANBERRA TIMES, Sunday, September 11, 1994 The man who made the POPE 13 million Features Peter Lennon meets the literary agent who deals in big dollars and who makes publishers tremble. THE POPE is not Mort Janklow's biggest client. Not in terms of dollars. For his pontifications, soon to be published by Knopf in the United States, Janklow only got him US10 million. This New York literary agent got the best-selling American novelist Sydney Sheldon 25 million for his book deal. We don't know exactly how much he gets for those who share this literary stable with the Pope Jackie Collins, Judith Krantz, Barbara Taylor Bradford, and Joe McGinnis (Ted Kennedy's reviled biographer, now working on a book on O. J. Simpson) since Janklow will no longer reveal details of authors' deals. But we can take it that Janklow becomes innumerate with any figure that drops below one million. But in terms of literary ascension the Pope's progress was spectacular. Sheldon, after all, was a sure-fire best seller; it needed a miracle to raise Pope John II into that bracket. Always halting, the market in John Paul II's books had been on the skids, recently. His first published in the US in 1981 by Farrar, Strauss and Giroux Love And Responsibility, only got a US25,000 advance and less than 20,000 of America's 57 million Catholics rushed to the bookstores to get it. Strauss was offered two more books by the Pope but turned them both down. Only two years ago, Harper brought out a volume directly aimed at American catholics, John Paul II's Letters To Catholics In The United States, and the publisher admits that it struggled unsuc- cessfully to reach 5000 sales. So how did His Holiness in his declining years put on a sudden burst of speed in racy narrative and sensational revelation to justify Knopf parting with US10 million, rather than, say, US4500 and a cheese burger? Knopf refused to reveal the contents of the book, other than to say that the Pope dealt with many of the major issues of our time. But to be secretive about the Pope's thoughts about moral and social issues is a bit like being secretive about the Ten Commandments. A very large number of people know them already even by heart. And you can forget suspenseful narrative. The book is simply the protracted responses of His Holiness to 35 key questions put to him by an Italian journalist. So the deal has little to do with the Pope certainly nothing to do with the quality or originality of his writing, nor indeed the content. It has everything to do with super-colossal marketing of literary properties by agents who have turned the publishing industry into Hollywood-by-theHudson and become at least as powerful as the publishing conglomerates who have, over the past couple of decades, been devouring independent publishing firms. Mort Janklow claims to be the man who defends writers from these bullying conglomerates. Roger Strauss, who published John Paul II's first book, has a different view. He is just a big hype artist. What could the Pope have to say that is new? It was not even specially translated from the Polish but translated from the Italian version. The problem is you won't get any enemy talk from American publishers about Janklow, they all have to do business with him. And, indeed, any publishers approached for comment were at meet ings and couldn't come to the phone. Janklow's response to Strauss was characteristically blunt; I don't want to be unkind about Roger but he is the kind of publisher who has a moral objection to any book selling more than 20,000 copies. Look, I could sell more than 20,000 copies of a book by a Tibetan monk on Himalayan grass. What makes Janklow, now in his sixties, different from the other top agents? He came late to the literary scene. A lawyer trained at Columbia University, he did his military service in the mid-Fifties in France in the American army's Provost Marshall's office at Orleans. He then joined a New York partnership specialising in mergers and ac- quisitions. One day William Safire, a friend since school days, who had been Richard Nixon's speechwriter for four years, asked him to handle a book he was about to write. Safire was giving up his speech writing job and preparing a book on Nixon. Watergate was only simmering then. Janklow protested he knew nothing about marketing a book, but Safire insisted and Janklow began to study publishers' contracts. I read them and said. 'Do people, really sign this stuff? He got a deal with a publisher called William Morrow and tied them up in what was to become one of his celebrated contracts, close-fitting as a Victorian lady's corset. He got Safire a quarter of a million dollars, big money in 1972. Safire's book, Nixon: Before The Fall, only dealt with pre-Watergate days, and pre- Watergate books were not exactly hot pastrami after Watergate. So the publishers wanted to go back on the deal. We'll sue you, Janklow warned. They laughed. No agent ever sues a publisher, they said. Janklow did. We whipped them, he said. We got the money and the book back and resold it. This was a key moment in literary agent history. After Safire, Janklow has been dealing in multiple millions. Jimmy Carter was also one of his clients. Does he not see anything incongruous in handling the Pope and Jackie Collins? The day I signed the Pope's deal I signed one with Dolly Parton, he said. He claimed that his interests are broad, and while he valued heavy intellectual work he was also an admirer of good story telling. He said he dealt with books that his mother would enjoy lying on the beach. Why did he think the Pope's book could justify a 10 million advance when previous books had created no interest? Listen, he said, when the Pope comes to New York one and a half million people will turn out to see him. Don't tell me they won't buy his book. I BELIEVE this is the only real book. The others were probably a collection of his speeches put together from cuttings. He wrote this book himself, Janklow said, forestalling any questions about corporeal ghosts. Why wasn't it translated from the original Polish? Well, the translation into Italian was so good and the Pope was so pleased they used that. Then it is easier to find people who could translate into say Japanese and other languages than from Italian. If Janklow has for long been regarded as a hype-artist, only interested in lurid best sellers, he recently made a shrewd move to raise the status of his company. He persuaded Lynn Nesbit, top literary agent of one of America's leading agencies, International Creative Mangement, to join him. The story is he waved 1 million dollars at her. Nesbit is noted not only for nurturing writers who become best sellers such as Michael Crichton, author of Jurassic Park, whom she discovered when he was a medical student she has also helped develop the career of writers of exceptional literary talent, such as the poet Diane Ackerman. Janklow insists that in the new hitech world of publishing and complex communications the author needs someone to not only defend but identify his interests. He would be swallowed up. An author needs strong representation. You know, there was a time when the literary agent was only allowed to come into a publisher's by the tradesman's entrance. Dickens's agent stopped that when he did the deal on Bleak House. He tore the book in half and told them they could have the other half when he could come in the front door. Roger Strauss also now seems prepared to modernise his methods, I'm going to bring out my Pope book on the back of Janklow's, he said. The Guardian
  98. 1994-12-08 Article 127259146, score 7.9231963 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BURNS PHILP,   TONY RUSSELL,   DAWN FRASER,   PAUL KELLY,   JOHN GARNSEY,   RUPERT MURDOCH,   DAVID BENNETT,   MARK ARNOLD,   JOHN BOWIE WILSON,   LANCE JONES,   MAYNE NICK,   MIKE EASTA,   RICHARD TALBOT,   TED KUNKEL
    Organisations RBA,   FEDERAL COURT,   SUN,   SYDNEY FUTURES EXCHANGE,   FOSTER'S BREWING GROUP LTD,   MAGELLAN,   COUNTY NATWEST,   RURAL PRESS,   NRMA,   NEWS CORP,   RESERVE BANK,   NEWS CORP LTD,   NIUGINI MINING,   BHP,   HAMBROS EQUI,   WESTPAC,   MONIER ROOFING,   WESTERN MINING,   NBC,   PLACER PACIFIC,   FCC,   FOX TELEVISION,   BROADCASTING,   COMMONWEALTH FUNDS MANAGEMENT,   MORGAN STOCKBROKING,   GOODMAN FIELDER,   BRAMBLES INDUSTRIES,   CRA,   COMMONWEALTH BANK,   INSTITUTE OF DIRECTORS,   AUSTRALIAN PROVINCIAL NEWSPAPERS,   ANZ,   BRAMBLES INDUSTRIES LTD,   TREASURY,   NATIONAL AUSTRALIA BANK
    Locations SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   VIETNAM,   CHINA,   SHANGHAI,   INDIA,   NEW YORK,   TIANJIN,   UNITED STATES,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc THAI,   EUROPEAN,   BRITISH,   AUSTRALIAN,   ASIAN
    Foster's again looking to expand SYDNEY: Foster's Brewing Group Ltd chief executive Ted Kunkel conceded yesterday that the brewing giant was near col lapse two years ago, but was now in a position to expand its core beer business. Foster's was on the brink of collapse, MrKunkel told an Institute of Directors function. The group was heavily over geared, with debts three times equity, and was under-perform ing, he said. In short, we faced a formidable challenge. It is now part of history that Foster's survived, mainly due to the support of its banks, especially BHP, during those critical days of 1992. Non-core assets had been de pleted to around 750 million from 2.76 billion during the past few years and the com pany planned to reduce these' further by 250 million a year for the next three years. The remaining non-core as sets are mainly property assets in Australia and the US. Mr Kunkel said Foster's stra tegy was to now concentrate on growth which included acquisi tions. This is intended to pro vide growth in the mid-term prior to our Asian investments bearing fruit in the late-1990's. Foster's is currently negotiat ing a third joint venture in Tianjin, China, which will take its investment in the region to around 50 million. The investment in China is expected to increase to around - 100 million by the end of 1995, lifting beer production to tliree million hectolitres from the current one million hectolitres. Foster's currently operates two joint ventures at Shanghai and Doumen. Mr Kunkel said Foster's plan was to run China at near break-even for three years as it developed the market and distribution systems in that country. China is about the long term, he said. Mr Kunkel said he also saw opportunities in India, Thai land and Vietnam. He said Foster's UK Courage division was performing very well in an intensely competi tive market. In the past 12 months 50 million had been shaved off costs at Courage and a further S60 million in cost reductions would be implemented in the current financial year. In 1993-94 Courage earnings before interest and tax dropped to 174 million from 208 mil lion previously, reflecting the strength 'of the Australian dol lar and increased competition from European imports. Mr Kunkel said Foster's stra tegy in Britain was under in vestigation. We have to get ourselves to a position where we have a level playing field with the other brewers. The 10 million launch of Foster's Ice in the UK had been very successful with 40 per cent of its annualised plan sales sold in the first nine weeks, he said. Foster's shares closed un changed at 1.10. Ted Kunkel, Foster's chief executive inertia ees shares dip SYDNEY: The Australian share market closed sharply lower yes terday after disappointment over the lack of an interest rate rise crippled investor enthusiasm. The all-ordinaries index closed down 22.0 points at 1869.2. The failure of the rise in interest rates to materialise has kept the ma jor players sidelined, Tony Russell, of Morgan Stockbroking, said. Brokers said interest rate uncer tainty continued to stir negative senti ment after the Reserve Bank failed to make an announcement at its usual 9.30am slot. Brokers said market confidence was also shaken by fears that the United States bourse would be further affect ed by sentiment over the'Fidelity Ma gellan Fund which has cancelled its year-end dividend pay-out. I think it's just that people are worried that this Magellan fund might have to do a lot of selling, John Bowie Wilson, of Hambros Equi ties, said. The all-industrials index ended down 25.0 points at 2704.2 and the all resources finished 20.2 points lower at 1245.3. ' National turnover totalled 163.3 mil lion shares, worth 396.7 million. Falls out-numbered rises by almost two to one. Goodman Fielder topped turnover on the industrial side with 11.17 mil lion shares traded. Brokers said County NatWest had crossed a total of 4.51 million shares in two separate parcels at 1.12, but could give no reason for the high turnover. Goodman Fielder ended down lc at 1.11. Among blue chip stocks, BHP shed 36c to 18.88, CRA plunged 48c to 17.54, Western Mining dropped 5c to 7.45 and M1M eased 3c to 2.32. News Corp lost 13c to 4.92,. the first time it has clipped below 5 (ad justed for share issues), since October 1992. The fall led the media sector down more than 2 per cent. Brokers said the stock was hit by a combination of worries, including a complaint brought against the Fox network in the US, fears that its float of BSkyB may be over-valued and strikes at News Corp newspapers in Australia. Among other media stocks, Sun shine Broadcasting slipped 10c to 1.65, Rural Press lost 5c to 4.15 and Australian Provincial Newspapers fell 4c to 1.38. The gold marker ended down 32.5 points at 1831.4. Among gold stocks, Newcrcst lost 23c to 5.50, Niugini Mining dropped 29c to 3.85 and Placer Pacific fell 8c to 3.32. Samantha lost 23c to 3.20. Elsewhere, Brambles Industries plunged 30c to 11.80 and Mayne Nick less slipped 6c to 6.19. However, Burns Philp defied the downward trend to climb 6c to 2.98. In the banking sector, Westpac shed 8c to 4.29, ANZ lost 7c to 3.95 and Commonwealth Bank eased 3c to 7.66, but National Australia Bank lifted 2c to 10.64. On the Sydney Futures Exchange, the December share price index con tract dropped 23 points to 1870 on turnover on 5248 lots. Bonds down, dollar steady SYDNEY: Australian bonds closed sharply weak er and the Australian dol lar began to look vulnera ble yesterday as the markets were weighed down by dashed expecta tions of a rate rise. The local unit closed un changed at US76.98c from US76.97c at Tuesday's fin ish, but on the fixed inter est market, benchmark Sep tember 2004 Commonwealth bond yields climbed 17 ba sis points to 10.33 per cent and September 1997 T-bonds jumped to 10.02 per cent from 9.89. The market was already long this morning ahead of the tightening that never came, one bond dealer said. Then the [ 800 million bond] tender weakened the market it was a double whammy. Traders were closely watching screens at 9.30am yesterday, widely expecting a rate rise to be announced after Tuesday's Reserve Bank board meeting.. However, they were dis appointed and many in the market took the absence of action as a sign the next in crease in rates would not come until 1995. The RBA probably won't hike tomorrow with the un employment figures out lat er in the day, one dealer said, referring to the re lease of labour force data for November. So it's looking more and more like an after-Christ mas hike. Ninety-day paper moved to 7.75 per cent from 7.92 and 180-day paper was at 8.50 per cent from 8.64 here last. Unofficial cash was steady at 6.50 per1 cent. The local dollar had the added burden of a declining greenback. National Australia Bank senior trader Mike Easta way said the US dollar's re treat would keep resistance at US77.20c out of reach of the local unit Overnight. He sees a range of US76.85c to US77.20C. The US dollar closed at 99.77 yen from 100.10 in New York and 100.38 in Sydney last. IN BRIEF Bonds take a rest SYDNEY: After months of market vola tility and disappointing tenders, the federal Treasury announced yesterday that it would not make another in dexed bonds issue until early next year. More growth SYDNEY: The Aus tralian economy would continue to grow for longer than many ex pect, and monetary pol icy alone was not enough to achieve the slow-down needed, Commonwealth Funds Management chief econ omist Dr Paul Kelly said yesterday. Price fixing SYDNEY: There were no price-fixing agree ments between major players in the concrete roof-tiling industry, Monier Roofing told the Prices Surveillance Au thority yesterday. Joint venture SYDNEY: Brambles Industries Ltd will buy an extra 20 per cent in a British joint venture for 51.5 million. News Corp shares fall to new low SYDNEY: Shares in News Corp Ltd fell to a two-year low yesterday amid uncertainty about Rupert Murdoch's future in United States television and rumours of another spending spree. Analysts' said yesterday that investors were con cerned about the uncer tainty created by NBC's bid to oust News Corp from the US TV industry on the basis that the group's ownership of Fox Television violated the Federal Communication Commissions policy. The FCC rules limit for eign ownership of televi sion stations to 25 per cent and NBC argues that News Corp is a foreign entity. News Corp shares fell 13c, or 2.5 per cent, to 4.92 yesterday, its lowest since October 1992. The stock has fallen more than 22 per cent sincethe' company an nounced a record profit of 1.34 billion in August. Lance Jones analyst Mark Arnold said invest ors were ruffled by the un certainty surrounding News Corp's ownership of Fox Television. There's uncertainty un til the FCC makes a deci sion, he said. NRMA urges action SYDNEY: The NRMA asked yesterday for an ur gent resolution to its ap peal in the Federal Court against a ruling that the prospectus for the contro versial 2.2 billion float was misleading. In summing up the NRMA's appeal, David Bennett, QC, said the case was clearly urgent . While reserving the court's decision, Chief Jus tice Black said the import ance of the case to both parties was understood. John Garnsey, QC, coun sel for dissident directors Dawn Fraser and Richard Talbot, who brought action opposing the float, told the court that members had not been given enough time to consider the impli cations of the 2.2 billion float. The NRMA is appealing against a Federal Court ruling that the prospectus for the NRMA float was misleading.
  99. 1994-08-17 Article 118263096, score 7.8729763 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NIKKI LAMSON,   NATASHA HARRIS,   JASON SMITH,   RICHARD RAUTER,   SALLY PATTON,   JAYNE TORVILL,   MARIA KARELLAS,   BURLEY GRIFFIN,   PAUL RAADTS,   LUKE DEANE,   URSULA DIXON,   STUART BECKINGHAM,   BRYCC STEVENS,   SARAH MAY,   DAVID FLATT,   CHRIS BUTLER,   NIKOLAI KOBETSKY,   BRUCE QUILLIVAN,   HELEN WELDON,   FIONA WCLLSM'ORC,   JOHN GALLAGHER
    Organisations NATIONAL SCHOOLS,   ROOMA SWIM CLUB,   KAMBAH HIGH SCHOOL,   CALWELL PLAYING,   NORTH ERN TERRITORY,   TUGGERANONG VIKINGS,   ALL AUSTRALIAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS,   STROMLO HIGH,   STUART
    Locations SOUTH AUSTRALIA,   NEW SOUTH WALES,   MELBOURNE,   CANBERRA,   CANTERBURY,   SYDNEY,   AUSTRALIA,   VICTORIA,   THREDBO,   ALBURY
    Misc WORLD CUP,   KNIGLITMOVES,   ALPINE,   NA,   MOST CONSISTENT PLAYER,   NSW STATE OPEN CHAMPIONSHIPS,   OLYMPICS,   TSRC CUP,   NATIONAL SECONDARY' SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIPS,   OPEN,   AUSTRALIAN
    Cool win for young ice champs JUNIOR SPORT When Jayne Torvill and Christo pher Dean come to Canberra next week, two of their biggest fans will be watching from the stand Canberra's new National Primary .Ice Dancing champions, Nikki Lamson and Stuart Beckingham. Nikki, 12, and Stuart, 1-3, won the, title at their first nationals, at the Canterbury ice rink in Sydney two weeks ago and have their sights set on the;. Junior World ..Championships ;and then, hopeful ly, the Olympics', in '2002 or 2006. Their coach, Sally Patton, 'said they had the ability to do anything , in the sport if tlicy maintained their desire. .. I think they have a lot of po tential and they could go past the Junior Worlds .'and on to be the top in this country, Patton said. But it-is a long road ahead and many things-can happen. They ; have got to set their goals for. the future but the opportunities here in Australia are limited. .The competition was tough in Sydney. After the first day's-com pulsory routine where the steps, rhythm and music are prescribed, three teams were equal first includ ing Nikki and Stuart. It was their free dance, where Patton choreographed their rou tine, on the: third and'finarday, which gave them victory. Not only didthey have four other, teams to jbeat, but 10 days before the competition Nikki cut her leg in a -fall, and it was a struggle to be fully , fit. It was hard; because it hurt a lot and 1 knew I was going to be weak, Nikki said. , Botli skaters also compete indi vidually and Stuart finished second inhis division in the nationals, boosting their confidence Tor the pairs event. - - The pairtrained five hours; a week on 'and off the ice for two years before they reached the na tionals and have built up a close friendship and trust which is evi dent when they are on the ice. Patton said trust is extremely important in pairs skating-so they always ;know what their partner is going to do. If someone is lifting you or throwing you, you've got to know they're going to be. there. For the boy he's got to know that the girl isn't going to -wimp out half-way through the middle of something; If she doesn't trust, she could give in and'that could cause a major disaster as well. The pair will compete at the Na tional Capital Ice Dance Challenge in Canberra in October, hoping to defend the title they won in the in-, augural event last year,, and then try to qualify for the.'Nbvicc divi sion of the nationals' next year. NIKKI and Stuart were not' the only ACT skaters who im pressed at the national titles. . : Nikki Lamson and Stuart Beckingham, Canberra's national ice dancing champions with agreat future. Micah. Johnson finished third be hind-Stuart in the primary men's division;V.Craig Coglan finished first in the novice men's division, the Kniglitmoves team was second in.the' open precision division and Maria Karellas finished third in the intermediate ladies division. OA.C.T. hockey defender Ursula Dixon has been named ,in the All Australian Secondary Schools team aftei; her efforts in the National Secondary' Schools Championships in'Albury, NSW, last week. Dixon, a student at Stromlo High, was an inspiration to her in experienced colleagues throughout the tournament and was runner-up in the Most Consistent Player or the Championships award. While the ACT side struggled in many of their games, they did have some encouraging performances in cluding a 2-1 win over the North ern Territory and a narrow loss to South Australia. The boys' championships were also held in Albury last week and like the girls, the inexperienced team returned with some encourag ing results, including a draw , against South Australia and West ern Australia. Coach Bruce Quillivan said, he regarded both those results as wins because of the relative standing and experience ' 6.f both, teams. A.C.TY SKIERS were again suc cessful at. the Alpine 'races at Thredbo on Sunday. They svon five trophies, including two first places, after the giant slalom com ponent. of the TSRC Cup, held on the challenging World Cup circuit. The trophy winners were Brycc Stevens first in the 10 and under boys division, Luke Deane first in the 12 and under boys, Sarah May second in the 12 anil under girls arid Natasha Harris third in the J2 (women). TUGGERANONG Vikings have appointed John Gallagher as junior development officer for the com ming season.' Gallagher lias been associated with the club for seven years, playing senior baseball and coaching junior teams for the last six. There will be a junior club day on Sunday at Calwell Playing i Fields in Were Street. , All juniors and new players wanting to register should attend at 12-lpni far under eights and un der 10s, l.30-2.30pm for under 12s. 2.45-3.30pm for under 14s and 3.45-4.30pm for under 16s. . For further information contact: Richard Rauter on 299 4006 (H), John Gallagher on 291 9297 (H) or Helen Weldon on 29,1 0348 (H). GINNINDERRA swimming club's Nikolai Kobetsky set two personal best times at the Na rooma Swim Club meet last week end. Kobetsky, 8, was the club's sole representative and was second in the 50m butterfly, third with a per sonal best time in the 50m back stroke and set another personal best in the 50m freestyle. BURLEY Griffin swimming club's Fiona Wcllsm'orc had some outstanding performances in both her age group and the open divi sion at the NSW State Open Championships in Sydney last weekend. Wellsmore. 13, won gold in the 13 and under 400m - freestyle and silver in the 13 and under 400m individual medley as well as a top eight finish in the Open 400m indi vidual medly, 800m freestyle and Open 200ni butterfly. - Team-mate Harris. Anasson won silver in the 16 and 17 years 400m freestyle and 400m individual med ly as well as bronze in the Open 200m butterfly. THREE ACT players have been identified for the Australian Vol leyball Federation's long-term pro gram after the National Schools' Volleyball Championships in Syd ney last week. Jason Smith, Paul Raadts and , Chris Butler were all chosen to join the elite junior squad and will attend a training camp after next year's national under-17 champion ships in Melbourne. ACT attacker David Flatt, from Kambah High School, also won All Australian selection. While there were several individ ual highlights, both the boys and girls team struggled against tlieir more experienced opposition to finish sixth, with the girls' narrow five-set loss to Victoria on the final day being the highlight of the tournament.
  100. 1994-04-17 Article 118113756, score 7.838457 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NELLIE TOKICH,   BRUNO ROSIN,   PETER KINANE,   PAUL KELLY,   BERNIE BRYANT,   DARCY WENTWORTH,   SCOTT BROTHERS,   MICHAEL TANCHEVSKI,   NEVILLE PARTON,   RAYMOND KOZJAK,   ROSEMARY FOLLETT,   DAVID SEVI,   MARILYN HOWARTH,   ROB BLACKETT,   GEORGE TANCHEVSKI,   SHANE BLUE,   MALCOLM NAYLOR,   MICHAEL SCOTT
    Organisations ANDERSON HOMES,   GLENEAGLES GOLF COURSE ESTATE,   SAPPHIRE COAST,   LANDCORP HOMES,   MBA MASTER BUILDERS' ASSOCIATION MBA MASTER BUILDERS' ASSOCIATION ADVERTISING,   KINGSTON MANUKA HOLDINGS,   PENDON CONSTRUCTIONS,   BLACKETT CONSTRUCTIONS,   ROSIN BROTHERS,   BEAUMONT COURT,   CANBERRA BUILDING INFORMATION CENTRE
    Locations APPIN GARDENS,   GAMBAN SQUARE,   JERRABOMBERRA ESTATE,   CANBERRA,   JERRABOMBER RA ESTATE,   MELBA,   SOUTH COAST,   ROSEWOOD GLEN,   PALMERSTON,   TIFFANY GARDENS,   AUSTRA,   YASS,   PENNY BEAUMONT,   THREDBO,   DOOLAND COURT,   FADDEN HILLS,   KINGSTON,   COOMA
    Misc OPEN,   FEDERATION-STYLE,   MEDIUM DENSITY
    MBA Master Builders' Association MBA Master Builders' Association Advertising Supplement Sunday, April 17, 1994 Judges note workmanship and diversity MEDIUM DENSITY AND CLUSTER HOMES UNDER 100,000 A diversity of design and high level of craftsmanship was evident in the 1994 MBA Excellence in Building Awards announced at the pre- sentation ceremony at the National Convention Centre on Friday night. The record number of entries was matched only by the strength of the competition. The majority of houses displayed truly contemporary attributes which would stand the test of time and enhance the Canberra urban environment, the judges said. They acknowledged the contribution of Canberra's architectural profession in the creation of these fine homes. In addition to the ACT, the judges visited Murrumbateman, Yass, Cooma, Thredbo, the South Coast and the Sapphire Coast. WINNER: Blackett Constructions (David and Marilyn Howarth). These townhouses (part of the Gamban Square development) feature functional layouts with a feeling of spaciousness. The standard of workmanship and finish are excellent throughout. The design incorporates two storeys with family living on the ground floor and three bedrooms on the upper floor. MERIT: Hapning Homes (Rick and Raymond Kozjak). This award is for a unit title project within a townhouse de- velopment in Dooland Court, Nicholls. Continued on Page 2 Top houses Continued from Page 1 These freestanding townhouses are part of a Federation-style development. 100,000 TO 150,000 WINNER: Classic Constructions (Michael and George Tanchevski). These townhouse units form part of the Rosewood Glen village in Jerrabomber ra Estate. A feature of these homes is the roof line. MERIT: Anderson Homes (John j Anderson). Anderson Homes have been an outstanding industry performer. This ! development at Melba features gener ous-sized living areas in each of the eight free-standing units. The focus is on . energy efficiency. OVER 150,000 WINNER: Blackett Constructions. The Ridges at Bruce is. a unique site atop, this popular subdivision. The site, which has a I4m fall, posed many difficulties. The homes are of executive standard featuring entertainment areas, high stan dard inclusions and finish. MERIT: Rosin Brothers (Andy and Bruno Rosin). The quality of the homes produced by Rosin Brothers comple ments their O'Malley location. This split level complex of five units features ex cellent inclusions. OPEN WINNER: Pendon Constructions (Don and Penny Beaumont). Nestled amongst the trees at Palmerston, the at tractive unit title development of Ber narra blends well with the environment. These architect-designed units feature varying living plans, and a high standard of workmanship. MERIT: Kingston Manuka Holdings (Neville Parton and Malcolm Naylor). The GeOTgetown development in Kingston incorporates 25 townhouses. The client brief required 2,000m2 base ment car parking and amenities includ ing a pool and gymnasium. MERIT: Classic Constructions (George and Michael Tanchevski) and Landcorp Homes (Peter Kinane and Darcy Wentworth). Rosewood is an excellent example of greenficlds inte grated housing. It contains 21 individu ally designed homes adjoining an attractive reserve. SPECIAL PURPOSE DWELLING - OPEN The special purpose dwelling category is dedicated to Government contracts, aged persons units and similar resi dences. Winner of the open contract homes section in Fadden Hills. WINNER: Whiteholme (Canberra) (David Sevi). Appin Gardens in Theo dore is an ACT Housing Trust mixed development of three-bedroom houses and one and two bedroom flats. A major constraint in the design and construc tion was a large number of mature euca lypts. The project incorporates a high standard of workmanship. MERIT: Pendon Constructions. Beaumont Court is a public housing pro ject in Tiffany Gardens, Phillip. The complex incorporates two storey units and townhouses. Their architect designs provide for a well defined floor plan, together with outdoor amenity. CONTRACT HOMES UNDER 160,000 WINNER: Accent Homes (Paul Kelly and Rob Blackett). This home incorporates a highly contemporary style with a creative concrete external finish. The exterior is matched by the high standard of internal presentation which incorporates high ceilings, quality fittings and a layout designed for relaxed living. The judges were impressed by the standard of workmanship in this con tract house in Jerrabomberra Estate. MERIT: Image Constructions (Tom and Nellie Tokich). A semi-federation style home in the Gleneagles Golf Course Estate. The solar passive design incorporates a separate outdoor living facility. 160,000- 240,000 WINNER: Scott Brothers (Chris and Michael Scott). This builder's home in Palmerston features architectural design and craftsmanship. It is built on several levels to achieve its multi-function pur pose. A feature is the parents' retreat which incorporates an attractive en trance an external spa pool. MERIT: Blackett Constructions. This four-bedroom architect-designed home in Palmerston is designed around separate living areas for the family. An outstanding feature is a parents private - courtyard and retreat. OPEN WINNER: Shane Blue. This 320mJ house incorporates double brick and timber construction in order to deal with a difficult sloping site in Fadden Hills. Features of this home, for which the bricklaying and carpentry received sub contractor awards, include the crafts manship in the use of timber and brick. MBA plays responsible role N 1994 THE MBA movement had sought to emphasise its responsibili ty to represent the building and con struction industry to the public, MBA Executive Director Bernie Bryant told Friday's awards function. At the start of the year the Chief Minister welcomed our initiative to en gage 46 new apprentices to our group apprenticeship scheme. Earlier this week, Chief Minister Rosemary Follett launched a building project which will establish the Can berra building information centre as a permanent and public facility for the MBA. This first stage of the building pro ject will provide the MBA and the AVT community with a large display facility for building products and materials. The Canberra Building Information Centre will display the best of Austra lian building technology and prac tices.

Blended keyword and kNN search - ada-002 found 821 articles

People
PAUL KEATING 128
JOHN HEWSON 86
JOHN MAJOR 79
ALEXANDER DOWNER 76
JOHN HOWARD 49
RALPH WILLIS 37
PETER BREWER 35
PETER COSTELLO 32
IAN HENDERSON 26
BOB HAWKE 25
Organisations
LABOR 88
PARLIAMENT 87
LIBERAL PARTY 70
UNITED NATIONS 66
ANZ 61
COALITION 60
BHP 59
WESTPAC 58
SENATE 52
RESERVE BANK 50
Locations
AUSTRALIA 306
SYDNEY 230
UNITED STATES 225
CANBERRA 132
LONDON 122
BRITAIN 109
MELBOURNE 103
EUROPE 76
AUSTRA 66
BOSNIA 55
Misc
AUSTRALIAN 299
BRITISH 114
AUSTRALIANS 77
AMERICAN 67
LIBERALS 61
EUROPEAN 59
SERBS 52
SERB 47
FRENCH 46
BOSNIAN 44
  1. Promoted from 4 to 1: 1994-05-15 Article 118211725, score 23.187675 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   KENNETH CLARKE,   MICHAEL PORTILLO,   MICHAEL HESELTINE,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN SMITH
    Organisations PARLIAMENT,   TORIES,   LABOUR
    Locations WALES,   LONDON,   SCOTLAND,   ENGLAND,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   EUROPE,   WATERLOO,   UNITED STATES,   GERMANY,   WELLINGTON,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc AMERICANS,   BRITONS,   AUSTRALIANS,   EUROPEAN,   CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH
    Jig is up for UK Conservatives BILL MANDLE THE BRITISH local-govern ment election results have been devastating for the Conservatives. Whether such elections ought to be taken as a national barome ter is nowadays a lost argument. The Conservatives themselves, ,and John Major in particular, de cided ,to fight a national cam paign in the hope the national . opipi.on polls might be proved wrong.-They weren't. Their repu tation, badly soiled by the last generalrelection result, has been restored? The '27 per cent level at which they estimated Conservative support was the one reached by Conservative council'candidates. In London, all seats were at stake; so too in Scotland. In the rest of England and Wales only a third of the seats were up for de cision, but the result must be tak n as nationally indicative, partic ularly as it is so close to the MORI poll findings of late April. Why the Conservatives chose to make the local-government elec tions a national referendum may seem a, mystery. To be sure, local government has been rendered so weak, in all that matters, by both liabour and Conservative govern tments in the '70s '80s and '90s that what they can do is deter mined by national government .policy, and voters realise that. .Even so, it would have seemed to lie in the Tories' best interest to Revolve its campaigning to such ;parish-pump issues as remain and keep Westminster out of it. That they did not do so is at tributable to Mr Major himself, much as he may now, in light of e result, attempt to disclaim it. 'It was his last, desperate throw to -retain 'his prime-ministership. On June 9 the elections for the Euro pean Parliament take place. But Air .Major, given the evident and continuing division in his party over the nature and extent of Britain's participation in Europe, could hardly use those elections as a Waterloo in which he was Wellington. Those who voted would be acting from a variety of motives/ Not all who voted Con servative could be claimed for Mr Major. He knows that the world knows that. The local government elections it had to be. Mr Major is a fighter. He will not go gladly into that good night of political oblivion. He has doggedness, vanity, and, as his re markable rise shows, no mean po litical skills. He was able, once, to be all things to all men, and to one woman. He proved capable of gaining her support and that of a great number of those who overthrew her. It has been his misfortune since to lose the sup port of both. HE IS now in a precarious position. But so he was late in the 1992 general election. Then acting uncannily, like Paul Keating, he decided to go it alone and fight the campaign off his own soapbox. So doing, he won. Again, as with Keating, he was helped by the fact that the elec torate trusted neither his oppo nents nor their leader. Neverthe less, the victory was quite rightly hailed as a personal triumph. Now Mr Major is again belea guered. Whether he, or indeed his party, should be, is another mat ter. The Conservative Govern ment has, on most of the indicat ors, done well. Industrial production is rising faster than Australia's;- Unemployment is now under 10 per cent, and fall ing. Inflation is low, at close to Australia's much vaunted rate in this, last quarter. Prime interest rates are much lower than Aus tralia's and Germany's; somewhat lower than the United States's. The stock market is up on the year. Only the current-account deficit is a worry. The Conserva tive front bench, Mr Major in cluded, is far abler and more pre sentable than Labour's, the more so now with the death of Labour leader John Smith. Whey then the deep unpopular ity of Mr Major and his Govern ment? Perception politics. The continuing sex scandals may not in any way have affected the economy; but Britons are not as tolerant as the Americans, or the Australians, come to that. They are more prurient, more envious, more insecure. That Britain's exit from the European exchange rate mechanism was a total reversal of declared policy is no cause for wonder these days. But it has been made one. Mr Major has been ruthlessly caricatured. An air of rickety shiftlessness prevails. The odour of decay blends with the scent of blood, and the aroma of rank, ensemen'd sheets. Mr Major was forced to make a stand. The party had to go along with him because it knows that its current desperate situation is not entirely due to Mr Major. Neither Kenneth Clarke, Michael Heseltine, nor Michael Portillo would stand a chance of winning a general election now. The fu ture, starting now, might have been different. The fall in elector al support has been so dramatic and so undeserved that there was hope that there could be an equally dramatic resurgence. Mr Major and his party were im pelled by similar desperation. In 1992 Mr Major himself and a scare campaign about Labour were sufficient to turn the tide. This time the personal appear ances and the bogey of loony-left Labour councils have not worked. Lightning has not struck twice. The killing blow has fallen else where; self-inflicted. '
  2. Promoted from 5 to 2: 1994-06-22 Article 118173252, score 23.031384 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People NORMAN FOWLER,   PAUL JUDGE,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations TORY,   TORIES
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN
    Misc INDEPENDENT,   CONSERVATIVES
    Major problems for unpopular PM 'There is not much point in spending money on a product that is unsaleable' LONDON: Big business and other financial supporters arc deserting Britain's ruling Con servative Party because of the unpopularity of the Prime Min ister, John Major, raising doubts about the leadership's confident claims that the party's financial crisis has been resolved. Former senior Conservative officials believe there could be a black hole of millions of pounds in the accounts which the party has to fill before it has to raise even more money to fight the next general election. The party is suffering from a crisis of financial uncertainty with traditional sources of fi nance ebbing away. Latest com pany accounts show that pay ments from 11 of the largest corporate donors have fallen from more than 500,000 (SA1.2 million) to about 100,000 (SA220,000) in the past year. Even allowing for an inevita ble drop after the 1992 election and the effect of the recession, it raises serious questions about the recent claims by the party's retiring chairman, Sir Norman Fowler, that the Tories' financial fortunes have improved. Sir Norman, announcing last week his plans to retire, said: In the last two years we have had a major reform of the party organisation and the party fi nances have been turned around. The fall in donations puts into sharp relief that claim and the confident assertion made to The Independent by Paul Judge, the Conservatives' director-general, who has responsibility for the party's finances, that he aims to eliminate the Tories' current 16.5 million overdraft by 1996. The party would probably need to raise at least the same amount again to fight the gener al election. For that to happen, large companies should be giving gen erously not scaling back their support. There are some who blame the parlous state of the finances for undermining electoral per formance. There are fears that the Tories will not have enough to pay for the next election. Three former senior party workers accused Sir Norman of giving the impression that the party's financial problems were over, when in truth, his succes sor has a mountain to climb. They argued that management reforms carried out by Sir Nor man at Tory central office will prove ineffective. The deficit is Sir Norman's fault, one said, accusing him of taking no action to stem it dur ing his first year when it grew by 6 million. The former financial managers said the financial troubles stemmed mainly from the con tinuing unpopularity of John Major and his Government. There's not much point in spending money on a product that is unsaleable. If there is a washing powder that nobody wants, there is no point in spending money on it, a former party treasurer said. The Independent
  3. Promoted from 9 to 3: 1994-02-16 Article 134302359, score 22.971605 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   HARTLEY BOOTFFS,   BILL CLINTON,   PAUL KEATING,   JOHN MAJOR
    Organisations IRA,   CONSERVATIVE,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   SBS
    Locations NORTHERN IRELAND,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   UNITED STATES
    Momentum against Major The administration of Britain's Prime Minister, John Major, has been deeply hurt by the continuing sex scandals which have seen the political and in one case physical demise of no fewer than six of his Conservative colleagues in the past five months. The damage has been exacerbated by the fact that the scandals have emerged during his back to basics campaign which is designed to asso ciate the Conservative Party with so-called family values. Indeed, Mr Major's troubles have highlighted the dangers of any poli tical party wishing to make capital from issues of morality and personal behaviour. The effect, both in Brit ain and in the United States where right-wing preacher-politicians pan dered to the moral majority , was precisely the opposite from that which was intended: the movement was undermined by its association with hypocritical rogues. It is one thing for a politician to declare his attitudes and values to ward his own family as Prime Minis ter Paul Keating did in an SBS interview on Monday, evening; it is quite another to translate that into a party political program embracing his colleagues. That is, quite simply, asking for trouble and Mr Keating has been too long in the political game-to,fall into that trap. A govern ment may promote the concept of the family in its multifarious combinations by producing mea sures such as Australia's family pay ments scheme, but it must be based upon needs rather than some pre scriptive definition of the ideal fami ly. However, Mr Major's troubles go much deeper. He is now widely re garded as a weak and ineffective leader. A massive 64 per cent of re spondents to a recent poll rejected his back to basics approach. In foreign affairs, his relationship with United States President Bill Clinton has never recovered from the assis tance his Government was seen to give the Bush campaign concerning Mr Clinton's activities while at Ox ford. His negotiating stance on Northern Ireland has.not produced the intended breakthrough with the IRA. His policies on Bosnia-Herze govina are seen as indecisive. It is because of this perceived weakness that relatively minor indis cretions from the most recent politic al casualty Hartley Bootffs kissing and cuddling of his former research assistant can assume the stature of a scandal with the capacity to rock the Government. There conies a point in political life when a leader's demise develops a momen tum of its own. Mr Major appears to be approaching that critical point.
  4. Promoted from 13 to 4: 1994-12-27 Article 127262781, score 22.799828 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ALBERT REYN,   AL EXANDER DOWNER,   QUEEN VICTORIA,   KENNETH CLARKE,   JOHN BRU,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN MAJOR MALCOLM BOOKER,   HELMUT KOHL
    Organisations IRA,   EUROPEAN UNION,   PARLIAMENT,   ROYAL FAMILY,   IRISH REPUBLICAN ARMY,   CONSERVA TIVE PARTY,   SINN FEIN,   STORMONT CASTLE
    Locations REPUBLIC OF IRELAND,   NORTHERN IRELAND,   EU ROPEAN UNION,   BRITAIN,   BELFAST,   EUROPE,   UNITED STATES,   GERMANY,   NORWAY
    Misc FRENCH,   CATHOLICS,   GERMAN,   EURO PEAN,   IRISH,   EUROPEAN,   ANTI-EURO,   EXCHEQUER,   NORWEGIANS,   BRITISH
    The undoing of John Major Malcolm Booker THE CONSERVATIVE lead ers in Britain, as in Aus tralia, have withdrawn with relief into the Christmas holiday period. The Prime Minister, John Major, has had a bad ' year and his leadership has been repeatedly under threat. Like Al exander Downer, he may wonder how long he will survive in the new year. Not all his problems have been his own fault. Ministers in his Government have been involved in bizarre sex scandals and have been obliged to resign. Normally in Britain such things are shrugged off by the ordinary pub lic. They have been part of Brit ish politics for hundreds of years, ranging from the homosexual King James I to Queen Victoria's obsession with horse grooms to the current antics of the younger members of the Royal Family. Even when members of the government have been involved the prime minister has usually been able to carry on without much difficulty. In Mr Major's case, however, they have been used as another stick to beat him with, and he is pictured as a leader without moral authority in his own party. Perhaps the greatest irony is that Mr Major is given little cred it for having set in train a pro cess that may end the conflict be I ' tween Protestants and Catholics that has shamed the people of Ire land for generations. A year ago he persuaded the Government of the Republic of Ireland to join with, his own in launching a peace process in which the Sinn Fein, the political wing of the .Irish Republican Army, agree to participate. At first the leader, Jerry Ad ams,'balked, and put'.forward a long list of conditions. They were eventually met by the British Government and the IRA' agreed to renounce the use of violence. Meetings were begun this month between the British and Irish authorities and the Sinn Fein in Stormont Castle, the building which was once the sym bol of British rule in the pro vince. They were interrupted by the unexpected fall of the Irish Government led by Albert Reyn olds, but his successor, John Bru ton, has promised to carry oh the process. Public bickering continues on both sides, but the meetings so far have been described as busi ness-like and constructive, and there is guarded optimism that a settlement will at last be achieved. There is also hope that international funds will be avail able. particularly from the United States, to rebuild the crippled economy of Northern Ireland. Meanwhile, the people of Belfast have enjoyed the first peaceful Christmas for 25 years. The issue that has overshad owed all John Major's good works and brought his Govern ment to the brink of collapse has been Britain's relationship with Europe. A substantial group in his own party still oppose the Eu ropean Union, and eight members were recently suspended for re fusing to support a measure for closer integration. The result has been that he no I John Major: his good work has been overshadowed. longer commands a secure major ity in Parliament and his Chan cellor of the Exchequer, Kenneth Clarke, has been forced to with draw a proposal included in his current mini-budget for an in crease in the value added tax. The main reason why the Gov ernment has not been voted out of office appears to be that the public-opinion polls show that La bour leads by 61 points to 21. Conservative Members realise that if an election were held in the near .future many of them would lose their seats. The objections of the anti-Euro pean members of the Conserva tive Party are based on their fear that the European Union will ul timately become a European fed eration in which Britain will be deprived of its independence. This idea is. however, rapidly losing its relevance. It was most ly in the mind of the German Chancellor, Helmut Kohl, and it is doubtful that it ever had any real substance. Even the German people no longer relish the idea that they might have to share the burdens of the less robust Euro pean economies. They are in creasingly preoccupied with re storing their historical dominance of central and eastern Europe, and are disinclined to ac cept. Hitherto the strength of the Eu ropean Union has been the close alliance between France'and Ger many. This is steadily weakening. The French no longer believe that Germany can be kept under control through such an alliance, and are increasingly seeing them selves as a focus of a balancing group of countries in western and southern Europe. They are even ready to contemplate'including Britain, in such a group. The likely development there fore is not towards a federal Eu rope but to the re-establishment of a competitive balance between east and west. The contemplated addition to the European Union of many new countries, most of which will be located in the east, will be likely to hasten this pro cess. In the past, such competition has led to war but, with luck, it will in future be conducted pure ly in the economic arena. Also, with luck, the whole of the conti nent will be an area of relative free trade. Whether it will remain a protective bloc vis-a-vis the rest of the world is still an open ques tion. The recent refusal of Norway to join the European Union may be a pointer to the future. The Norwegians have always looked to the .wide.r world rather than to the continent, and they still see this as offering the best prospects for their country. The British who feel likewise may yet be proved right.
  5. Promoted from 23 to 5: 1994-06-29 Article 118174863, score 22.515852 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JEANLUC DEHAENE,   PAUL KEATING,   PETER SUTHERLAND,   JACQUES DELORS,   JEAN-LUC DEHAENE
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION,   EUROPEAN COMMISSION,   GATT,   BRITISH PRESS
    Locations FRANCE,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN,   HOLLYWOOD,   EUROPE,   CORFU,   IRELAND,   GERMANY
    Misc AMERICANS,   BELGIANS,   FRENCH,   BRITONS,   BELGIAN,   EUROPEAN,   GERMANS,   PARIS-BONN AXIS,   BRITISH
    Major's fortunes turn around JOHN MAJOR must be almost unable, to believe his luck. In a single stroke he has stood up for Britain , enraged the French, frustrated the Germans and insulted the Belgians. He could hardly have designed a better ploy to appeal to his fellow Britons. And indeed he is being hailed in the British Press as a strong leader and execrated in the French media as Thatcher without a handbag . Already his Tory backbench is saying that his previously shaky hold on the Prime Minister ship has firmed substantially. The cause of this remarkable turnaround in Mr Major's fortunes was his weekend veto of Belgian Prime Minister Jean-Luc Dehaene for the post of president of the European Commission when France's Jacques Delors retires next January. Britain stood out against its 11 co-members of the European Union and has forced them to start the process again. The burden will fall principally on Germany which takes over the rotating presidency of the union as opposed to the commission which actually runs the European bureaucracy and is re- sponsible for producing an acceptable chief executive. Mr Major's actions might have had a touch of domestic political calculation in them. He is, after all, a politician who won his own unwinnable election well before Paul Keating followed suit. But the main reason for Britain's rejecting JeanLuc Dehaene goes to the heart of the conceptual framework within which the European Union will develop. Dehaene was not simply the the choice of the Paris-Bonn axis, he was the only choice they would countenance. Moreover, neither President Mitterrand nor Chancellor Kohl deigned to go through the usual diplomatic niceties to gain support before the Corfu meeting. Also, the Belgian Prime Minister is known to favour a more centralised Europe than the British who see the union developing more in federalist terms than in a tight centrally directed polity. In this sense the British action represents an important declaration of principle, though given the 11-1 vote against them it is highly doubtful whether they will prevail in the long term. However, Mr Major's action might well have beneficial if unintended effects for Australia's trading position; Germany's first choice if they can't have Dehaene is Ireland's Peter Sutherland whose outstanding leadership in the GATT trade talks last year rescued success from the jaws of failure. Sutherland is a dedicated free trader with a reputation for persuading the most intransigent pro- tectionists of the value of give and take. And even French hardliners were impressed with his strength of purpose when the Americans almost wrecked the GATT talks with their last-minute demands from the Hollywood lobby. He would bring a new and refreshing approach to one of the world's most influential tasks.
  6. kNN only result: 1994-01-30 Article 126925731, score 21.874786 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People BARONESS THATCHER,   JOHN MAJOR,   NORMAN LAMONT
    Organisations LEEDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,   LABOUR PARTY,   TIMES,   LABOUR
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN
    Misc RS,   EXCHEQUER
    [Foreign Major's moral crusade nauseating: Lamont LONDON: A bitter attack by Norman Lamont, a former Chan cellor of the Exchequer, on a weak and hopeless Prime Minister on Friday night overshadowed John Major's latest attempt to resuscitate his beleaguered back to basics campaign. Mr Major signalled his determi nation to stand by his-slogan defining the basics as the econo my, education and building a safer and more ordered society . But Mr Lamont reportedly lambasted him for the pathetic censoring of his former Chancellor's speeches, on one occasion to remove all refer ence to Baroness Thatcher, the for mer prime minister. The end of a bad week for the Government, with ministers mounting defences against Labour claims of broken taxation promises, was not helped by Downing Street's confirmation that 10 per cent of all pensioners will pay more tax from April. Mr Major played it safe in a speech to the Leeds Chamber of Commerce on Friday night, con centrating on economic and educa tional basics, limiting the subject of the controversial moral arena to a single reference to building a more ordered society . In a Times interview yesterday, Mr Lamont is reported describing the moral crusade as nauseating and proclaiming that he would nev er be caught banging on about family values . Mr Major said that Britain had the conditions for long-term sus tainable growth 2 per cent growth, 5'/i per cent interest rates, the lowest time lost through strikes for more than a century and falling unemployment. But Mr Lamont -7 appeared intent on claiming the credit too, saying: I believe that my stewardship at the Exchequer will be seen to have been eficctive in laying down the basis for recov ery. A. raft of ministers on Friday sought to underline the Govern ment's claim that tax would be higher under a Labour Party spend ing program. But low taxation or, to coin the most recent formulation, lowest possible taxation, did not ap pear expressly in Mr Major's list of the most basic basics of the econ omy: lower borrowing, lower un employment, low inflation and more growth . Emphasising that competitive ness was the key theme of the eco nomic and education basics, Mr Major pledged to deliver the re skilling of Britain along with the three Rs. Recalling an earlier com mitment to a classlcss society, he said: We must get rid of the dam aging distinction between white and blue-collar skills ... Anyone who's come up the hard way knows how many others there are who have talent but don't ... breakthrouch the barriers. TlMlndtfMndttil
  7. kNN only result: 1994-04-01 Article 118110551, score 21.669888 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   KEN NETH CLARKE,   JOHN MAJOR MR CLARKE,   JOHN CARLISLE,   MARGARET THATCHER,   TONY MARLOW,   MRS THATCHER,   JOHN MAJOR,   MI CHAEL HESELTINE
    Organisations IRISH REPUBLI CAN ARMY,   EUROPEAN UNION,   DAILY EXPRESS,   EU,   CABINET,   PARLIAMENT
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN
    Misc EUROPEAN,   EXCHEQUER,   IRON LA,   CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH,   U-TURNS
    Seeds sown for Conservative uprising Major facing mutiny after EU climb-down LONDON: British Prime Minis ter John Major faced the growing threat of a mutiny against his lead ership yesterday after a Cabinet col league openly staked a claim to be his successor. Parliament has been rife with ru mours that Mr Major's humiliating climb-down in a row over European voting rights this week sowed the seeds of a Conservative uprising like the one that toppled Iron La dy Margaret Thatcher in 1990. Routine pledges of support from Cabinet ministers on Wednesday failed to dispel the sense that Mr Major's main rivals in the ruling party were already girding for a leadership battle later in the year. An acknowledged front-runner in any contest, Finance Minister Ken neth Clarke, stoked the speculation by saying bluntly in a media inter view that he fully intended to suc ceed Mr Major as Britain's prime minister. Yesterday's newspapers pounced on Mr Clarke's comments as a cod ed signal to Trade Secretary Mi chael Heseltine, whose initial challenge brought down Mrs Thatcher, that he would have a fight on his hands if he tried again for the premiership. In the Daily Express, Mr Clarke's leadership ambitions grabbed most of the front page and pushed news that the Irish Republi can Army was briefly suspending its violent campaign for a united Ire land into a mere side column. Prime Minister John Major Mr Clarke, a skilled politician who has made no sccret of his wish to become prime minister, said in a radio interview that he was ready to step into Mr Major's shoes. I intend to succeed John Major when John Major of his own voli tion goes, he said. Although he stressed this was a long way ahead , the suggestion that Mr Ma jor's days were numbered was not lost on the British media, recalling as it did the jostling for position ahead of Mrs Thatcher's downfall. Mr Major might have hoped that his Chancellor of the Exchequer, whom he has rebuked in the past for undue candour, might have kept his career plans to himself on this occa sion. But Mr Major's announcement this week that his Government was accepting a new voting formula in an enlarged European Union, after vowing earlier no retreat on the is sue, has emboldened his critics. A Conservative maverick anti European, Tony Marlow, called on Mr Major on Tuesday to resign, in an act of parliamentary mutiny. A second Conservative Member of Parliament, John Carlisle, joined him on Wednesday in calling for Mr Major to quit. Mr Carlisle, insisting he was' speaking for many of his colleagues, said policy U-turns and indecisive leadership had fatally undercut Mr Major's credibility as Prime Minis ter. The Conservatives have shown they will not flinch from deposing a leader they think could put them out of power, as they did with the unpopular Mrs Thatcher. The next general election must be held by May, 1997.
  8. kNN only result: 1994-12-08 Article 127259245, score 21.654587 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   NICK PARSONS,   KENNETH CLARKE,   ALAN WHEATLEY,   JOHN MA,   TONY MARLOW,   JOHN MAJOR,   TONY BLAIR
    Organisations BUDGET,   EUROPEAN UNION,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOUR PARTY,   REUTERS LONDON,   CIBC WOOD GUNDY,   LABOUR
    Locations LONDON,   BRITAIN,   EUROPE
    Misc EUROSCEPTICS,   BUD,   EXCHEQUER
    INTERNATIONAL Conservative crisis after Budget defeat By ALAN WHEATLEY of Reuters LONDON, Wednesday: Brit ish Prime Minister John Ma jor faces a crisis after a stinging parliamentary defeat punched a big hole in the Government's Budget and ex posed his weakening grip on the ruling Conservative Par ty. Senior government officials said Mr Major had no intention of resigning or calling an early election, despite a surprisingly heavy defeat over his plans to double the tax on home-heating fuel. But the setback is likely to raise doubts whether Mr Major is able or willing to soldier on at the head of a divided and demor alised party until the next elec tion, which must be held by mid 1997. Tony Blair, Leader of the oppo sition Labour Party, said the hu miliating defeat showed Mr Major headed a divided, discredited and dying government that was no longer fit to govern. For months they have been lurching from one crisis to anoth er and now they have been tipped over the brink, he said. The Government lost by 319 votes to 311 after seven Conserva tive MPs rejected the deeply un popular tax and others abstained. The Government promptly gave up any thought of forcing a sec ond vote in the new year and abandoned plans to raise the tax from eight per cent to 17.5 per cent in April. With an eye on jittery financial markets, Chancellor of the Exche quer Kenneth Clarke said he would bring in other tax in creases and spending cuts to plug the 1.5 billion (SA3.06 billion) hole left in the Budget. I will produce ... a package of spending and taxation measures designed to keep borrowing on course and to regain confidence in the strong recovery of this country, Mr Clarke said in a late-night statement to a packed and noisy Parliament. London markets were expected to open lower and extremely ner vous on Wednesday after the de feat. If the Government can't even carry what is effectively the centrepiece of its own budget leg islation there have got to be grave doubts about everything, the head of the treasury advisory group at CIBC Wood Gundy, Nick Parsons, said. Ministers were taken aback by the margin of the defeat. The rebels several of them Eurosceptics who also defied Mr Major last week on a confi dence vote to increase Britain's payments to the European Union abandoned the Government de spite a last-gasp attempt to buy their support. Minutes before the critical vote, Mr Clarke promised com pensation estimated at an extra 100 million ( A204 million) a year for pensioners and poor peo ple who would have been hardest hit by the tax. The last time the Government was defeated on part of its Bud get was in 1981. Labour, more than 20 points ahead in opinion polls, had seized on the fuel tax issue to rub salt in Conservative wounds, already raw after infighting over Brit ain's role in Europe. Rebels said their revolt was not aimed at humiliating Mr Major but to stop the imposition of an iniquitous tax. One said he was merely trying to save the Government from it self. John Major has actually been quite effective in the House of Commons recently but he has ei ther been misled, misadvised or unfortunate, a Conservative reb el, Tony Marlow, said. Mr Major had said he would not resign even if he lost the vote. However, the defeat, on a pro cedural motion paving the way for a formal vote on whether to implement the tax increase, underscored the Prime Minister's weak hold over his divided and demoralised Conservatives. They defied the Government despite the last-minute offer of ex tra compensation from Mr Clarke. Mr Major just scraped home last week in a vote of confi dence over Britain's payments to the European Union and was forced last month to drop legisla tion to privatise the post office af ter opposition from a hard core of Conservatives. Pictures: AP Watched by the Prime Minister of Britain, John Major, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Kenneth Clarke (inset), speaks to a packed House of Commons after the Government lost a key vote to increase taxes on domestic fuels.
  9. kNN only result: 1994-11-27 Article 130540376, score 21.614403 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People ELIZA BETH,   MICHAEL HESELTINE,   JOHN MAJOR,   MARCUS FOX,   MALCOLM RIFKIND
    Organisations BBC,   EUROPEAN UNION,   DAILY EXPRESS,   CABINET,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   REUTER,   TIMES
    Locations LONDON,   NORTHERN IRELAND
    Misc BILL,   MR MAJOR,   COMMONS,   EUROPEAN,   GOVERNMENT
    Major crushes Eurorebels for now LONDON, Saturday: The Brit ish Prime Minister, John Major, appears to have quashed a par liamentary rebellion in his rul ing Conservative Party over a European finance Bill by threat ening to call a general election if it was defeated. Aides to Mr Major said yester day that they were confident the Bill would be approved. And the Defence Minister, Malcolm Rifkind, asked whether the Government would win the vote on the Bill on Monday, said in a BBC television interview: I think so. But the price of Mr Major's drastic tactics could be a chal lenge to his leadership, which would deal another damaging blow to his already shaky au thority. Right-wing, anti-European Conservative Members of Parlia ment had threatened a show down with Mr Major on Monday when the House of Commons votes on the Bill to boost Brit ain's payments to the European Union. Yesterday, 18 of the reb els tabled an amendment to the bill. With a slim majority of just 14 in the Commons, Mr Major would have had to rely on a handful of allies from rightist Northern Ireland parties to help him through. But the rebellion began to crumble as rebels, un der pressure from Conservative Party headquarters and their lo cal constituencies, shied away from bringing the unpopular Government down, and with it themselves. Mr Major's threat was backed up by his Cabinet, which said it would follow the Prime Minister and quit if the Government was defeated on Monday. Today's Daily Express news paper reported that Queen Eliza beth had agreed to dissolve Par liament if Mr Major lost on Monday. Some rebels had claimed the Queen would refuse an election and instead ask a Cabinet Minister to form anoth er government. Sir Marcus Fox, a Major ally who this week narrowly de feated a challenge to his leader ship of an influential Commons committee representing rank and file Conservative MPs, also said the rebellion was crum bling. In the national interest, col leagues who were thinking of pushing this to the brink are now turning back, he said. But some of the rebels, dissat isfied with Mr Major's running of government, were already planning a leadership challenge. The Times newspaper said to day one of these rebels, who was not named, told it he had two thirds of the 34 MPs needed to mount a challenge to Mr Major. Others were sympathetic and could join the rebel ranks after Monday's vote, the MP was al leged to have said. The rebels have until next Wednesday to demand a vote on the leadership. Mr Major won the prime min istership four years ago after a leadership challenge to Marga ret Thatcher by her arch-enemy, Michael Heseltine, triggered her downfall. Reuter
  10. kNN only result: 1994-11-30 Article 130541090, score 21.591682 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People KENNETH CLARKE,   MAIOR BV ALAN WHFATLFY,   RICHARD BODY,   JOHN MAJOR,   NORMAN LAMONT
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION,   CONSERVATIVE,   EU,   AL BUDGET,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOUR PARTY
    Locations LONDON,   EU,   EUROPE
    Misc EUROSCEPTICS,   EURO-BUD,   BILL,   EUROS,   CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH
    INTERNATIONAL MPs expelled in row over EU Key win saves Maior Bv ALAN WHFATLFY LONDON,' Tuesday: British Prime Minister John Major was saved from humiliating defeat and a snap election by winning a key vote on Europe, but his par liamentary majority on paper disappeared after abstaining right-wingers in his Conserva tive Party were expelled from the parliamentary party. Mr Major hoped Finance Minister Kenneth Clarke could restore morale in his divided party by dangling the prospect of tax cuts in today's annu al Budget. Mr Clarke led the Government fight in Parliament last night to ram through a Bill which increased Brit ain's contributions to the European Union. The Government, deeply un popular with voters, had threatened to call an election if it were defeated, which would almost certainly have ended the Conservatives' 15-year hold on power. The strong-arm tactics worked Mr Major had a comfortable majori ty, of 27 votes but eight Conserva tive members of Parliament regis tered their resentment at handing more cash to the EU by abstaining from the vote. John Major The Government's business man agers promptly withdrew the party whip from the rebels effectively expelling them from the parliament ary party and thus erasing Mr Ma jor's 14-seat majority in the 651-seat House of Commons. Another Euros ceptic MP, Sir .Richard Body, volun-. tarily resigned the whip. The expulsion of the rebels is testi mony . to the desperate tactics Mr Major is having to use to keep a semblance of control over his frac tious party, divided to the core over Europe. Losing his majority need not spell the end for Mr Major after four years as prime minister because the dissidents normally vote with the Government on . issues other than Europe. But he will face a challenge every bit as tough as yesterday's Euro-bud get vote when the opposition Labour Party tables ia motion next Tuesday seeking to block an increase in value added tax on domestic fuel, to take effect next April. Even before then, the anger of the Eurosceptics could spill over into a formal challenge to Mr Major's lead ership of the party. The deadline for nominations is midday tomorrow. Mr Major is hop ing that-Mr Clarke will be able to ease the pressure by producing a reassuring Budget. Mr Clarke long ago ruled out the tax cuts demanded by Conservative / right-wingers nervous about La bour's 25-point lead in opinion polls. But with the rapidly expanding British economy spinning off greater than-expected tax revenues, and with docile inflation holding down the Government's outlays, Mr Clarke is likely to project a big drop in the Government's budget deficit. Instead of the Government's cur rent forecast of 28 billion (SA57.55 billion) in 1995-96, some economists believe Mr Clarke could pencil in a deficit closer to 20 billion (A41.ll billion). If he can point to a balanced bud get by 1997-98, Conservative MPs will almost certainly be able to count on tax cuts to restore the party's dismal political fortunes in time for the next election, which must be held by April 1997. . But even the glittering prize of tax : cuts might not be enough to stop tension over Europe from tearihg the Conservatives apart. Mr Clarke's predecessor, Norman Lamont, warned in yesterday's de bate that Europe could still split the Conservatives asunder and said the party should consider all alternatives including withdrawal from the EU.
  11. kNN only result: 1994-05-07 Article 118210066, score 21.575909 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   NORMAN FOWLER,   MICHAEL PORTILLO,   JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN SMITH
    Organisations CABINET,   LABOUR PARTY,   EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT,   REUTER
    Locations LONDON,   SCOTLAND,   ENGLAND,   BRITAIN
    Misc CONSERVATIVES
    INTERNATIONAL Major humiliated In local elections LONDON: In a humiliating setback for Prime Minister John Major, Britain's ruling party yesterday suffered its worst defeat in local elections as traditional Conservative voters deserted his crisis plagued Government. Diehard Conservatives throughout Britain switched allegiance or stayed at home to show disapproval of 18.months of muddle and policy U-turns by Mr Major and his ministers. The Conservatives' share of the vote in Thursday's poll fell to 27 per cent, 14 points behind the main opposition Labour Party and one point behind the centrist Liberal Democrats who profited most from the Conservative doubters. It was believed to be the first time the Conservatives have been placed third in a major election since 1945. At the 1992 general election the Conservatives took 43 per cent of the vote. With only a few results yet to be declared, the Conservatives had lost control of 16 councils, kept control in 12 and won one. Conservative leaders admitted the results were very disappoint- ing. They tried to pass them off as a mid-term protest by voters who would return to the Conservative fold at the next general election, due by mid-1997. They also denied that Mr Major's position was now in jeopardy. I don't think there is any question about the position of John Major as the leader of the party and as prime minister, said party chairman Sir Norman Fowler. I think the result of this election tonight will actually be to produce a rallying effect, said Cabinet member Michael Portillo, the main right-wing contender for the leadership. But there seems little doubt that Mr Major's job will be on the line if, as expected, these heavy losses are repeated at elections on June 9 for the European Parliament. The Conservatives were all but annihilated in Scotland and suffered badly in the north of England. But the most worrying results occurred in London. Conservative voters and councillors blamed the poor results on a combination of tax rises which came into effect in April, Mr Major's lacklustre performance and a sense that the Government was not in control. Labour was delighted by its showing, which if repeated at a general election would give it a huge parliamentary majority. This has been a splendid night for Labour. We have achieved far more than could have been expected, said party Leader John Smith. But the big winners were the Liberal Democrats who increased their number of councils by 10 to 18, Reuter
  12. kNN only result: 1994-05-09 Article 118210467, score 21.568573 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   PETER LILLEY,   KENNETH CLARKE,   JOHN RED,   MICHAEL PORTILLO,   MICHAEL HESELTINE,   JOHN CARLISLE,   MARGARET THATCHER,   MRS THATCHER,   MI CHAEL HOWARD,   JOHN MAJOR,   DON WOOLFORD,   ANTHONY MEYER
    Organisations BOARD OF TRADE,   SUNDAY TIMES,   CONSERVATIVES,   LABOUR PARTY,   SOCIETY SECURITY,   INGHAM,   CARLISLE,   EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT,   REUTERS,   TREASURY,   TORIES,   LABOUR
    Locations LONDON,   AUSTRALIA,   BRITAIN
    Misc EXCHE,   EURO PEAN,   ANTI-EUROPEAN,   EUROPEAN,   BRITISH,   AUSTRALIAN
    INTERNATIONAL Major may face leadership test within weeks By DON WOOLFORD of AAP, and Reuters LONDON: Unless there is a po litical miracle in five weeks, British Prime Minister John Major will almost certainly face a leadership challenge. The miracle would be a much im proved Conservative performance in the June 9 elections to the European Parliament. Although the issues are different, last Thursday's humiliations in the British local government elections sug gest such miracles are not in season. A Sunday Times poll predicted the Conservatives would win just 12 seats in the European parliamentary elec tions compared to 56 for the opposi tion Labour Party and 14 for the cen trist Liberal Democrats. Local government elections are much more important indicators in Britain than in Australia. There being no states, they are the only other level of government, with much more exten sive powers than Australian councils. And they are totally politicised. Almost everything about Thursday's elections was bad news for the Tories. They finished third in the overall vote . 27 per cent to the Liberal Democrat's 28 per cent and Labour's 41 per cent. They lost a total of 429 seats and control of councils in their regional heartlands. This was despite the fact that they are widely regarded as better local government managers. Tory councils usually have lower rates, with Labour burdened by the image of its loony Left turning some of its councils into very expensive laboratories of political correctness. All this might not have mattered so much if Mr Major, badly advised by his party machine, had kept his distance rather than campaigning. John Major: needing a miracle and miracles are not in season. Nor might it have mattered greatly if Mr Major had the support of his, party the Government is still only mid-term; or if he was not the. most unpopular prime minister since pin ion polling started. . , ' . ': Mr Major operates in an atmo sphere of almost perpetual destabilisa tion which varies only in its degree; Thursday's results raised the temper ature to boiling point, when back bencher John Carlisle declared that if no-one else challenged the Prime Min ister, he would. Mr Carlisle is a stalking horse (stalking donkey, says the acidic Ber nard Ingham, who was Margaret Thatcher's press secretary). He'd be lucky to get two votes in the party room, except he'd be giving MPs the chance to vote against Mr Major. Everyone remembers another little known backbencher, Anthony Meyer, challenged Mrs Thatcher in Novem ber, 1989, that 60 MPs either voted against her or abstained, and that that was the beginning of her end. The real beneficiaries of a Carlisle challenge are more likely to be Board of Trade President Michael Heseltine, Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke, or Treasury Secretary Michael Portillo. Mr Major is a good deal tougher and more resilient than his grey image suggests, and he's made it clear he'll face any challenger head-on. His first move after the European election will probably be a reshuffle. But whether it will be one of those cosmetic affairs to give the appearance of leadership, or a real clean-out of enemies, is uncertain. Many of his supporters would like him to sack Mr Portillo, and perhaps the rest of the anti-European right in Cabinet. Mr Portillo was long regarded as aiming to be kingmaker this time round; backing Mr Heseltine in return for becoming Chancellor of the Exche quer was the most common theory. But some observers think he may now be aiming for the top as anti-European sentiment grows. By publicly opposing a single Euro pean currency last week he went be yond government policy, reinforced the impression of disunity on the eve of the local government elections, and gave Mr Major a half decent excuse to get rid of him. One growing view is that if you're going to get rid of Mr Portillo, you might as well go the whole hog and get rid of his ideological mates as well Society Security Secretary Peter Lilley, Welsh Secretary John Red wood, and maybe Home Secretary Mi chael Howard. If the European Parliament election is as bad for the Tories as last week's election results suggest, the governing party faces a long hot summer of am bition, manoeuvre and fear. - AAP
  13. kNN only result: 1994-06-11 Article 118170459, score 21.565355 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People STEPHEN MILLIGAN,   PADDY ASHDOWN,   JACK STRAW,   MARGARET THATCHER,   STEPHEN REID,   JOHN MAJOR,   DAVID CHIDGEY
    Organisations TORY,   LABOR,   LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOR PARTY,   EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT,   TORIES
    Locations EASTLEIGH,   LONDON
    Misc TORY,   CONSERVATIVES
    By-election disaster kicks off Major's dice with voters LONDON: Prime Minister John Major's Government lost another scat in the House of Commons yesterday and opposition parties are looking for ward to gains in elections for the Eu ropean Parliament. The' Conservatives, who have not won a by-election since 1989, finished third in Eastleigh, a seat they won handily in the 1992 general election. We have had mid-term by-elections that are bad before, and we have come back from that and won, said Conservative Party chairman Sir Nor man Fowler. He blamed the defeats on tax in creases and the lingering effects of a long recession. Only one Conservative seat was at stake in five by-elections held yester day. The other four seats had been held by the main opposition, the La bor Party. It won all four again. The results trimmed Conservative strength in the House of Commons to just 16 more than the combined oppo sition. . Mr Major's hold on power may hinge on results of elections for 87 European Parliament seats which will be announced tomorrow. Projections based on pre-election opinion polls suggest the Conservatives could lose more than half their 32 seats. If the party does even worse than that, MPs nervous about their own re-election might be tempted to install a new leader as they did in over throwing Margaret Thatcher in 1990. Yesterday's setback came just a month after the Conservatives were humiliated in local government elec tions, winning just 27 per cent of the vote, one point behind the Liberal Democrats and far behind the Labor Party's 41 per cent share. David Chidgey of the small, centrist Liberal Democratic Party was an nounced as the winner this morning in Eastleigh, where he won 24,473 vcites, Mr Major: leadership challenge . in the autumn? a margin of 9239 over Labor's candi date. Both totals were similar to their district vote in 1992. The Conservative vote, however, collapsed. Stephen Milligan, the Tory MP whose death led to the special election, collected 38,998 votes in 1992, and Conservative Stephen Reid got just 13,675 yesterday. To have pushed the Tories into third place is a complete vindication of our campaign. For the Tories it just gets worse and worse, said Jack Straw, an MP who managed the La bor campaign. The Liberal Democrats have now won three former Tory .seats since the general election. This is a devastatiiig humiliation for the Government and a powerful verdict on the Conservatives' broken promises, Paddy Ashdown, leader of the Liberal Democrats said. Under Conservative rules, Mr Ma jor could face a challenge to his lead ership in the northern autumn. No candidate has yet emerged to challenge him, despite constant speculation about the manoeuvres of likely con tenders.
  14. kNN only result: 1994-01-12 Article 126922143, score 21.520065 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People JOHN MAJOR,   JOHN PATTEN,   TIM YEO,   DAVID ASHBY
    Organisations CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   CAITHNESS,   INTERNATIONAL TORIES,   THE TIMES
    Locations FRANCE,   EUROPE,   LONDON
    Misc CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH
    INTERNATIONAL Tories sink into a moral stew Three MPs exposed . more rattling in the closet LONDON: A string of sex scandals and resignations has battered British Prime. Minis ter John Major's crusade for traditional moral values and, with it, his leadership. One Government minister said the trouble had plunged the Conservative Party into its toughest period for many years just when things had seemed to be looking up for Mr Major. Usually loyal newspapers at tacked Major for indecisive leadership which left his Gov ernment at the mercy of any potentially damaging story which might come along and warned there would be more of them. When ministers preach one creed and practise another, newspapers have a clear duty to expose the hypocrisy, The Times said. And the end is not yet even near. . Three Government mem bers have resigned within a week over private-life scandals which critics say make a mock ery of Mr Major's policy to return to old family values . Junior minister Tim Yeo quit reluctantly after admitting he had fathered a child in an extra-marital affair and anoth er official resigned over a con troversial property deal. A second junior minister, the Earl of Caithness, resigned swiftly after his wife's apparent suicide which newspapers linked yesterday with his al leged relationship with another woman. More embarrassment came with a revelation that a mar ried MP, David Ashby, had shared a hotel bedroom in France with a male friend. Ashby denied any homosexual affair although he admitted his marriage was in trouble. Education Secretary John Patten said the Conservatives, still healing deep wounds from a party rift over Europe last year, were facing the toughest period he could remember.' The back-to-basics cam paign, meant to unite the party faithful, has backfired and po liticians on the left and right of the party now seem unable to agree over what it means. Right-wing ministers say it is about personal morality. They have little sympathy for col leagues who get caught, or are defended by Mr Major. Others say it is about restor ing decency and respect in areas such as law and order and education. R utw au WW John Major: indecisive.
  15. kNN only result: 1994-01-21 Article 126923992, score 21.3913 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MRS THATCHER
    Organisations BOARD OF TRADE,   FOREIGN OFFICE,   WHITEHALL,   HOME OFFICE,   TREASURY
    Locations LONDON,   MALAYSIA
    Misc MAASTRICHT,   LABOUR VICIOUSNESS,   GUARDIAN,   BACK TO BASICS,   BRITISH
    Unravelling not due to Major alone From HUGO YOUNG in London THE SLOW disintegration of a government is a very rare sight. It is terrible for the country, but interesting to political scientists. Watching the Major Government disintegrate is an experience like none witnessed by anyone alive. An extended laboratory experiment is unfolding before our eyes. It is time for the men in white coats to draw some preliminary conclusions. Governments have fallen apart before, but not in these circumstances. The fall of Mrs Thatcher was, by comparison, instant. It was over almost before it began, with the abruptness appropriate to the temper of what went before; and it was not a death but apparently the beginning of rebirth. The end of the Heath Government is not a helpful precedent either. Its terminal crisis concluded swiftly, and was foreshadowed by no inner break-up of any kind. The weekly, daily, sometimes hourly hysteria that afflicts the Major Government is likely, by contrast, to last indefinitely. It is the context in which Mr Major will continue to survive or, just possibly, not. That means two more years of the same. What inferences can already be deduced? Firstly, a Ditching Major will be tempting but would also be the final self-inflicted disaster. disintegrating government evidently does not need to be facing a real crisis or impossible dilemmas. It brings its problems on itself. This Government's objective situation, at home and abroad, looks promising. The economy is in modest recovery, inflation is under control. Neither a payments crisis such as gripped Wilson nor a union crisis such as the one that destroyed Heath is any danger. Externally, nothing threatens the Government's position. Its crises, instead, stem from its own incompetence. It has made choices it cannot defend, and adopted tactics that have not worked. It lied about tax to win the election, and invented a half-baked moral message to obscure its lack of a political purpose. It is an object of ridicule, because it forfeited public conviction that it knows where it is going, or can get there even when it does. Secondly, a self-destroying party does not need to have any substantive disagreements. Last year, there was a real argument about the Maastricht treaty. It divided right and left about a serious issue, on which the Prime Minister had no alternative but to take the stand he did. Again his tactics may have been questionable, but they addressed an un- avoidable ideological battle over the British national interest. The present turbulence is sometimes reported as if it were ideological. The wild swirls of recrimina- tion, in a party facing up to enduring unpopularity, occasional- ly touch on a real argument: for example, about the future of welfare, or the proper role of the state. But as an account of the big picture, this is misleading. The camps are not divided between left and right. The confused ranting and panicky lashing-out are driven much more by personal animosities than coherent ideas. If there is a serious pattern, it resembles the old Labour viciousness, in which most of the effort was expended on allocating blame for the past and present as a way of positioning for the future. Thirdly, disintegration seems to acquire a self-accelerating quality. The more it becomes manifest, the more desperate ministers become to stop it. And the more desperate they grow, the more unreliable becomes their connection with reality. Examples proliferate of their capacity to abuse the meaning of words. The Home Secretary, Mr Howard, in defending his attempt to acquire ministerial control over local police forces, commits himself to the proposition that Home Office nomination to police au- thorities is in no way a centralising initiative. The Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Mr Portillo, seeking an explanation for public cynicism, is unable. to concede that this has anything whatever to do with the two-faced conduct of ministers. Everyone is to blame except government itself. To contend, as the Prime Minister suddenly did, that the Back to Basics message was never meant to have any reference to the personal morality of ministers reveals a man who simply did not understand the meaning of his own Big Idea. Fourthly, however, the laboratory judgment has to be that this disintegration is more than personal. It is not reversible by the removal of a single man. Mr Major may have lost his political authority, but the deficiency is not his alone. Each or those domponents of the remorseless collapse has been shared by every member of the Government at one time or another. Maybe the Tories are regretting the choice of Major in 1990, even though he won them the election. It is a fair bet that neither Mr Heseltine, the president of the Board of Trade, nor Mr Hurd, the Foreign Secretary, would have presided over this particular brand of ineptitude. But no minister now escapes contamination. Can anyone name a single office- seekingTory politician, in or out of cabinet, whose words any longer command public respect? Ditching Major later this year will be a temptation. But the exercise would be the final self-inflicted disaster, based on a premise only fantasists believe in. The fifth element of collapse is the least avoidable, but perhaps the most salutary. A significant part of what is happening to the Major Government is due to the simple fact that it has been in power too long. This is visible in the hubristic disdain for propriety the Tories have increasingly exhibited. Rath er more telling is the precise nature of the retribution now adding daily to the serious case against them. If they had not won the last election, there would still have had to be a Scott Inquiry, or something like it, after the collapse of the Matrix Churchill trial. But its expose of the confusion and amorality at large in Whitehall would have been an academic affair. The ministers concerned would have been out of power, and less obliged to pollute public life still further by denying their responsibilities. The blatant arms-for-aid scandal the Foreign Office insisted on per- petrating in Malaysia might have been uncovered, but would not have prompted the slippery apologias we've heard this week from ministers determined, above all, to deny that they ever make mistakes. A disintegrating government turns out, finally, to be one that's been in power so long the Prime Minister no longer remembers what it has done, or whether he knew anything about it. The Guardian
  16. kNN only result: 1994-06-28 Article 118174790, score 21.379656 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People DOUGLAS HURD,   JOHN MAJOR.-1,   FRANCOIS MITTERRAND,   HELMUT KQHL,   AVILFRIED MARTENS,   SILVIO BERLUSCONI,   DE HAENE,   ETIENNE DAVIGNON,   KLAUS KINKEL,   JOHN MAJOR,   PETER SUTH,   JEAN-LUC DEHAENE
    Organisations BBC,   EU,   HOUSE OF COMMONS,   EUROPEAN COMMISSION,   EU COMMISSION,   PARLIAMENT,   EU COUNCIL
    Locations FRANCE,   LONDON,   GREAT BRITAIN,   BRITAIN,   BRUSSELS,   CORFU,   GERMANY,   BILD
    Misc BELGIANS,   FRENCH,   GERMAN,   EURO-SCEPTIC,   GERMANS,   ITALIAN,   BRITISH
    British Tories rally behind their leader LONDON: John Major is expected to secure a strong and swift demonstration of Conser vative support in the House of Commons after- a renewed pledge that the Government would not reverse its veto on the appointment of Jean-Luc Dehaene as president of the European Commission. The British Prime Mjnister was due to make a statement to the Commons about the Corfu summit yesterday Major's Euro-sceptic critics queued up alongside se nior party stalwarts to praise his use of the veto, the Foreign Secretary, Douglas Hurd, said explicitly that Britain would not yield to the expected in tense pressure over the next fortnight to change its mind. We will not accept Mr De haene, he said. Although Mr Hurd expressed strong optimism that an accept able candidate : would emerge, the rift between Britain and its EU partners ap peared as wide as ever on Sunday. Germany, which takes over the rotating presidency of the EU Council this week, said it' was standing by Mr Dehaene. The Germans said they saw no reason to seek a compromise candidate before EU leaders meet again for an emergency summit in Brussels on July 15. Despite deep unease among some pro-European Conserva tives at Britain's isolation on the issue, and private warnings from the Tory Right that Mr Major must not accept another federalist as an .alternative, the British Prime Minister would face Parliament with his party standing strengthened. at least temporarily. Elsewhere in the European Commission, blame for the. Corfu debacle is not being heaped entirely on Britain's shoulders. There was much bit terness about the inflexible line adopted at Corfu by the Ger man , Chancellor, Helmut Kqhl. and the French President. Francois Mitterrand. Although 11 countries ultimately voted against Britain, it took consid erable Franco-German arm twisting to achieve that. It is not clear whethcrr'the other countries will now force Germany, and France' to take a more conciliatory view. The Italian Presjdent.. Silvio Berlusconi, said immediately af ter, the summit that Mr De haene's chances were finished and new candidates must come forward. But the German For eign Minister, Klaus Kinkel, in an interview to He published in Bild, will increase the stakes by insisting, There is no reason to bring compromise candidates: into the discussion. The chances of one alterna 6 No reason to seek a compromise' tiye, Peter Suth erland. of Ire land, appeared to; be fading. Mr Sutherland, head of the Gatt se cretariat, is, seen as a surrogate British candidate; Germany and iFrance are ex pected to oppose him on that ground. Othen possibilities in clude two other Belgians, the former Prime Minister,AVilfried Martens, and the former EU Commission, vice-president, Etienne Davignon. Mr Dehaerie said in a televi sion interview he understood the political1 pressures on Mr Major at home. On a personal level, I have no problem with John Major.-1 am not blind to his problems, in Great Britain. 1 even have some pity for him. Mr Hurd said in a BBC in terview, YoU really do need to have somebody who is general ly acceptable, and not some body who is pushed through in this Way. The Independent
  17. kNN only result: 1994-10-12 Article 118290972, score 21.363947 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   LADY THATCHER,   ROBIN JOHN MAJOR,   ALAN WHEATLEY,   MARGARET THATCHER,   DAVID HUNT,   JOHN MAJOR,   TONY BLAIR
    Organisations CONSERVATIVE,   CABINET,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   LABOUR PARTY,   WELSH ASSEMBLY,   THE TIMES,   REUTER,   LABOUR
    Locations LONDON,   SAUDI ARABIA,   ENGLAND,   BOURNEMOUTH,   SOUTH AFRICA,   UNITED KINGDOM
    Misc SCOTTISH,   CONSERVATIVES,   BRITISH
    Blair rides high on eve of conference as Major founders in sea of 'sleaze' By ALAN WHEATLEY BOURNEMOUTH, England, Tuesday: His Conservative Party's annual conference has not even started, but British Prime Minister John Major is already wondering how to rescue it from a sea of sleaze. Mr Major's hopes of using the gathering as a platform to counter surging Opposition Leader Tony Blair have been dealt a severe blow by allegations that Mark, son of his predecessor Margaret Thatcher, earned 12 million ( A25.84 million) as the middleman in a big arms deal signed by his mother. Lady Thatcher denies sleaze, The Times newspaper said in a front-page headline. Controversy over the charges will hang heavily over the four-day conference when it opens today, especially as Lady Thatcher plans to attend the day's debates. The former prime minister said she was satisfied the 20 billion ( A43.06 billion) AlYamamah sale of British arms to Saudi Arabia in the mid-1980s had been properly negotiated. A statement issued through her London office said, She is proud that, after a great deal of hard work by ministers and officials, it brought thousands of jobs and billions of pounds of exports to this country . But the main opposition Labour Party, emboldened by polls showing the public view the Government as sleazy and disreputable, pressed for a full inquiry to establish whether Mr Thatcher had improperly peddled his influence. There is no suggestion in the allegations, made in The Sunday Times, that any laws had been broken. But Labour's industry spokesman Robin John Major arrives in Bournemouth on Monday Cook said Lady Thatcher stood accused of allowing her son to use her position to feather his own nest with the biggest handout on record . Mr Thatcher has denied involvement in the arms deal and Conservative ministers yesterday stuck to the line that any evidence of impropriety should be passed on to the appropriate authorities, in this case the Secretary to the Cabinet. Public Services Minister, David Hunt, said, The sooner we forget all these unfounded allegations, the better. The timing of the row is cruel luck for Mr Major, who needs all the help he can get to narrow Mr Blair's 25-point poll lead. He could be forgiven for wishing Lady Thatcher, whom he replaced in November, 1990, would just go away. Publication of her memoirs, in which she belittled Mr Major's intellectual powers, overshadowed last year's party conference. And last month she spoiled his landmark visit to South Africa with ill-timed remarks about the risk of investing there. Mr Major will be counting on today's debates on agriculture, foreign affairs and transport to put the spotlight back on the policy differences between the Conservatives and Labour. Addressing party workers yesterday, Mr Major attacked Mr Blair's new-look Labour, which is rapidly dumping its socialist baggage to win middle-class votes, for offering pap, not substance . We must lay into their policies because they are the slippery slope back to the problems this country has sweated blood to put right, he said. Mr Major vowed to defend the identity of the United Kingdom, condemning Mr Blair's plan for a Scottish parliament and Welsh assembly as dangerous, explosive tinkering. But Mr Hunt denied that the Conservatives, in seeking to put clear water between themselves and Labour, intended to lurch to the Right: We're not going to move away from our ground. Reuter
  18. Demoted from 3 to 18: 1994-11-26 Article 130540186, score 18.313337 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People MR MAJOR,   WILLIAM CASH,   MARGARET THATCHER,   JOHN MAJOR,   MARCUS FOX,   RICHARD MEARES
    Organisations EUROPEAN UNION,   EU,   CABINET,   CONSERVATIVE PARTY,   PARLIAMENT,   LABOUR PARTY
    Locations LONDON,   EU,   BRITAIN,   EUROPE
    Misc MAASTRICHT,   EUROSCEPTIC,   EURO-REBELS,   GUARDIAN,   BRITISH
    INTERNATIONAL Major warns Tories: EU yes or a poll - By RICHARD MEARES LONDON, Friday: The British Prime Minister, John Major, has turned the thumbscrews on Euro-rebels in his ruling Conservative Party, saying that if they de fy him over a European Union budget vote next week he will call elections. Political commentators said his threat was likely to ensure any revolt fails but they were carefully counting heads. Uncer tainty lingered as some rebels vowed to fight on despite the danger to a government only two years into a five-year term. Mr Major said he and his Cabinet colleagues had agreed to stand or fall together over the vote on Monday to authorise a hefty rise in Britain's contribu tion to next year's EU budget. If the Government were de feated, the Government would resign and the Prime Minister would ask the Queen to dissolve Parliament, he said in a state ment. Cabinet members publicly de clared their support to quell re ports that their ranks contained Eurosceptic rebels politic ians ready to challenge Mr Ma jor for the leadership. Party leaders said rebels were wrong to think they could crack a unit ed front to avoid elections, and John Major insisted no-one would bid for Mr Major's job if the budget Bill sank. In a key victory for Mr Major, rebels failed to oust his choice, Marcus Fox, from the leadership of a key panel of Conservative backbench MPs. The closed-door vote was widely seen as a chal lenge by proxy to Mr Major's authority, but the real test will come on Monday. The public row is highly dam aging to a party and Govern ment already blackened by splits and scandals involving Members' shady private morals and financial ethics. Just one thing after another, said the ed itorial in today's Guardian newspaper. Many hard-core anti-EU poli ticians are also critical of Mr Major's handling of the Govern ment since he took over from Margaret Thatcher in 1990 in a party coup. Mr Major, 31 percentage points behind the Labour Party in the latest opinion poll, has long been hounded by unrest over Europe, his party's most di visive issue. After victory in the last general election in 1992, he narrowly survived a similar cri sis over a vote to ratify the Maastricht treaty on political ties in the EU. Before Mr Major's interven tion yesterday, rebel William Cash said some 15 Conservatives would vote for an amendment to the bill withholding extra cash until the EU had cracked down on fraud. Mr Gash said he doubted the Prime Minister would really call an election if he lost. But most observers said they believed the solidity of Cabinet support for Mr Major had convinced the rebels the Prime Minister really meant.what he said. Ftoutftr
  19. Promoted from 22 to 19: 1994-10-22 Article 118293215, score 17.53485 [Similar docs] [Trove article] [ Wikipedia Entities] [[SIM MAP]
    People TIM SMITH,   MR MAJOR,   GRAHAM RIDDICK,   MR SMITH,   DAVID HENCKE,   IAN GREER,   MOHAMED AL-FAYED,   PETER PRESTON,   ROBIN BUTLER,   MICHAEL WHITE,   NEIL HAMILTON,   JOHN MAJOR,&nbs